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LITHIUM, LITHIUM DISCUSSION
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 16 2019, 09:32 AM
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Russia’s Rosatom looks to buy 51% of giant Chilean lithium mine
QUOTE
Deal would give access to major deposits of key mineral for battery manufacturing


read more - https://www.ft.com/content/c9c91a68-ef55-11...a4-b25f11f42901



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Oct 10 2019, 11:20 AM
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In Reply To: triage's post @ Oct 9 2019, 10:12 PM

as blacksheep posted in the MNS thread (as Prof Whittingham is a non-executive director with Magnis)

- "These brilliant minds changed the way human civilization interacts with energy.” It all started with Whittingham.
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Dr. Whittingham, who is now based at Binghamton University in New York state, sought to make a stronger battery during the 1970s oil crisis, with the goal of eliminating the use of fossil fuels in energy production. Working at Exxon, he made the first functional lithium battery, using pure lithium metal for the negative end, or anode, and another material for the positive end, called the cathode.

The flow of negatively charged electrons from the battery’s anode to the cathode generates power. The cathode was also laced with positively charged lithium particles, or ions, which helped make the battery rechargeable. The battery, however, was still too expensive and dangerous for broad commercialization. Oil prices also dropped in the 1980s, and Exxon discontinued the project, but the field continued to forge ahead.

“It’s been great to see how it grew,” Dr. Whittingham said. “Lots of people helped it along the way, and now it’s a multi-billion dollar industry.”

Dr. Goodenough, also researching alternative power sources in the wake of the oil crisis, increased the battery’s storage capacity in 1980. He did that by changing the material that makes up the battery’s positively charged end, or cathode, which receives electrons. Dr. Goodenough’s change doubled the power of the batteries to four volts, increasing their potential as an energy source.

Dr. Yoshino fine-tuned the batteries by making the anode end out of lithium ions rather than solid metal, incorporating them into a carbon material, petroleum coke. The change made the batteries safer, lighter, less expensive to produce, and capable of being recharged hundreds of times.

Sony Corp. was first to commercialize the lithium-ion battery in the early 1990s, followed by a joint venture of Asahi Kase i Corp., which Dr. Yoshino is affiliated with, and Toshiba Corp.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: blacksheep  
 
triage
post Posted: Oct 9 2019, 10:12 PM
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The developers of lithium ion batteries are awarded the 2019 Nobel prize in chemistry.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-09/nobe...opment/11588298

And it was also announced that the parents of one of the winners, John B Goodenough, were given a posthumous kick up the bum for branding their son with a name that after 97 years he has finally lived up to. Reminds me of Johnny Cash's song about the boy being named Sue so as to toughen him up.



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  blacksheep  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 9 2019, 01:30 PM
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Bolivians protest over lithium deal with German company
QUOTE
Locals are demanding more benefits from a planned German lithium project. The raw material is key to expanding battery cell production for electric cars.
Demonstrators on Monday launched a series of rolling protests demanding the Bolivian government grant more benefits from a massive lithium project with Germany's privately owned ACI Systems.

Residents in the province of Potosi say they will not receive enough royalties from the plan to build a factory for electric vehicle batteries and a lithium hydroxide plant.

Read more: Germany hopes to mine lithium, the white gold of e-mobility

Protesters marched and blockaded streets in the first of a series of protests planned by the Potosi Civic Committee, which will amplify their demands in the coming days with public and education strikes if President Evo Morales doesn't respond.

The committee's president, Marco Antonio Pumari, and its general secretary, Josefina Zuleta, are on a hunger strike in the capital, La Paz.

The Uyuni salt pans are believed to have one of the world's largest deposits of lithium, a key raw material for battery cell production.

read more - https://www.dw.com/en/bolivians-protest-ove...pany/a-50732216



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 9 2019, 12:25 PM
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Roskill's view - Lithium: Current prices provide limited incentive for new supply

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Given the current unsustainable situation, and limited risk reduction potential through lack of price transparency, we expect a recovery in lithium spot prices to be necessary to support the development of new capacity, even though contract prices are healthier. Furthermore, the analysis above is based on estimates put forward within technical reports, which by their nature are often representative of a ‘best case scenario’ for items such as capital expenditure, operating costs and utilisation rates (particularly over their initial years of production). This optimism is arguably more significant within the lithium industry, where there is a lack of experience in developing new supply, as well as few recently developed operations to benchmark greenfield projects against.

With this in mind, we have flexed some of the project assumptions above to build in a 25% overspend in capex and a plant utilisation rate 15% below capacity. As shown below, this makes the above analysis look even more ominous.
Attached Image


Source: Roskill – Lithium Cost Model Service & Greenfield Battery Raw Material Projects report

A portion of the new supply required in future will be met via brownfield expansions at existing producers which, in many instances, provide stronger returns on investment than their greenfield counterparts analysed here. However, we remain sceptical of the ability of these (few) assets to generate the sustained levels of supply growth required to meet the rise in demand over the medium to long-term.

Furthermore, it’s arguable that lithium projects need to provide better investment incentives than other mining projects, not only to support lithium’s aggressive medium-term growth profile but also, and perhaps more importantly, to cover the uncertainty shrouding lithium demand over the long-term. This principally relates to developments in EV powertrain technologies, which not only could shift demand within lithium (i.e. from lithium carbonate to hydroxide or, potentially, to another form of lithium) but could even eliminate its requirement altogether.


read more - https://roskill.com/news/lithium-current-pr...for-new-supply/



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 28 2019, 02:55 PM
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S&P GLOBAL PLATTS 9 Sep, 2019
Why lithium has turned from gold to dust for investors
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Trade frictions and geopolitical uncertainty have made 2019 a challenging year for commodities investors in general. However, few resources have been trickier to fathom, or more unpredictable, than cobalt and lithium.


QUOTE
Investment bank Morgan Stanley now forecasts prices could fall by a further 30% through to the end of 2025 as suppliers race to bring on new production and refining capacity. Shares in the world’s largest producers such as Albemarle in the US and Chile’s SQM have also taken a hit from the slump. Meanwhile, Ganfeng – China’s largest lithium producer and a supplier of carbonate to Tesla – said this week that first-half profits tumbled almost 60%.

Inefficient production
First used commercially by Japan’s Sony in the early 1990s to power video recorders, lithium-ion batteries have become the gold standard for EVs because they store more power per unit of weight compared with alternatives such as nickel-cadmium. The trade-off is cost and the toxic process to refine the material along with producing the batteries. Materials such as lithium, cobalt, nickel and graphite account for about a third of total EV battery costs. The rest is gobbled up by inefficient manufacturing processes and elongated supply chains.

“Overhead costs for producing an EV battery are still large and economies of scale have not yet been established meaning that the price of the raw materials used in a battery has a limited impact on the overall price of the battery,” said Goldenberg.

Go deeper – S&P Global Platts 2nd Annual Battery Metals Conference
Underlying the slump in lithium is the continued consumer distrust of EVs and their limited range when compared with the internal combustion engine. British motorists remain largely unconvinced by the technology, despite the government’s desire to promote plug-ins at all costs. Sales fell in June for the first time since 2017. Only one in every 17 cars leaving UK forecourts is powered by electricity. It remains to be seen how EVs will compete once generous subsidies to induce consumers to purchase these predominantly luxury vehicles are reduced over time.

Sales may be growing globally, but they are also modest when compared with the total fleet of cars on the roads. EVs only accounted for 2.5% of total passenger vehicle sales last year, according to the S&P Global Platts Analytics Electric Vehicle Sales & Policy Scorecard. However, sales are expected to reach 24 million by 2030 and accelerate beyond that as more governments introduce legislation to reduce emissions to net zero by 2050.




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 


blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 27 2019, 04:57 PM
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Canadian lithium-tech companies find traction amid rise of electric cars
Canada's mainstream lithium miners continue to struggle suggesting the next wave of growth will come from technology — not geology
extract
QUOTE
On Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau travelled to Burnaby, British Columbia to announce his latest climate change initiative at the pilot plant of an upstart company that’s tinkering with lithium-ion battery technology.

His choice of venue revealed much about the opportunities in Canada as a new supply chain takes shape around the growing electric vehicle industry, which relies on lithium-ion batteries, not oil.

Although mining has been a historical strength in Canada, the latest rush around battery metals may end up providing more opportunities to this country’s fledgling technology sector. It is companies such as Nano One Materials Inc., whose facilities Trudeau visited, as well as lithium brine extraction and recycling companies that are generating publicity, drawing investments, partnerships and government support for their plans to build businesses around the rising demand for lithium.

“Our model is really to form partnerships with the large established players and license out our technology,” said Dan Blondal, chief executive of Nano One. “They’re going to be better at supply chains … but what we are good at is process innovation.”


read more - https://business.financialpost.com/commodit...f-electric-cars



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 21 2019, 01:56 PM
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Wrap up by Tim Boreham

https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2019/09/19/beh...arket-meltdown/
QUOTE
The stronger-for-longer lithium story is not exactly panning out as such, with a global oversupply emerging and the upbeat blue sky stories supplanted by tales of woe from the emerging producers. The same thing’s happening with that other wonder battery metal, graphite.

Suddenly a litany of woes has enveloped the lithium sector, although arguably the downturn has been years in the making.....




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 2 2019, 11:43 AM
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Interesting read from Warwick Grigor - Far East Capital - >>>> http://www.fareastcapital.com.au/imagesDB/...mm31Aug2019.pdf - Lithium sector melting down as off-takers become an issue



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 1 2019, 08:16 PM
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QUOTE
all a-buzz when juniors signed offtake agreements

...... a handshake ain't worth the paper it's written on



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


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