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MANGANESE, THE THIRD ELECTRIC VEHICLE METALS NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT
blacksheep
post Posted: Jun 15 2018, 01:00 PM
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extract of interview with Jon Hykawy, president of Stormcrow Capital
QUOTE
INN: Now, we have talked about lithium when it comes to EV batteries, and cobalt, nickel and even graphene yesterday. Do you see any other metals coming forward to play a key role?

JH: One of the big ones is manganese, and that’s in the NCM chemistry that is used by General Motors (NYSE:GM), by Nissan (TSE:7201), frankly by most of the automotive manufacturers out there except for Tesla (NASDAQ:TSLA). The full name of that cathode chemical is lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt oxide, a bit of a mouthful. But you need a substantial amount of manganese; again there’s a question about what sort of manganese? How pure?

Again, we’re not going to run out of manganese on a macro level making batteries, but we do have issues around the chemical purity required and the ability to produce these manganese salts that are the actual feedstock that go into battery manufacturing. So manganese is another interesting one — I just haven’t had a client come to me yet and say, “boy, we’re really concerned about manganese.”

https://investingnews.com/daily/resource-in...al-fuel-future/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 18 2017, 07:42 PM
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Manganese: High prices have boosted supply

QUOTE
Figures from the International Manganese Institute (IMnI) suggest that in the first nine months of 2017, manganese ore supply rose 28% on 2016 levels. IMnI data also indicates that high carbon ferromanganese supply was up 19.6% year-on-year.

Roskill view: This growth in output is related to sustained high prices and which have taken the market by surprise. While companies were, at first, reluctant to bring high-cost production back on line, sustained high prices have boosted confidence and supply has increased substantially. Because of high ore prices, output in South Africa looks set to exceed its previous peak level (~14Mt, seen in 2014) by at least 10%. Australian output has also risen substantially in 2017 due to the restart of the Woodie Woodie and Bootu Creek mines, and additional output is also flowing from other key producing countries such as Ghana, where ConsMin has doubled output over the past two years.

https://roskill.com/news/manganese-high-prices-have-boosted



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 21 2017, 12:03 PM
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Pure Minerals (PM1) - formerly known as Eagle Nickel (ENL) recently re- listed and is hoping to cash in on the reported future manganese demand for EV's - "Manganese minnow Pure Minerals hopes to ride wave of demand"
https://stockhead.com.au/resources/manganes...wave-of-demand/
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--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 17 2017, 01:16 PM
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In Reply To: bg99's post @ Aug 17 2017, 12:46 PM

Yes - nice chart. Has the horse bolted already - at least for the time being?

Noticed the "please explain" from ASX this morning and they refer to the Woodie Woodie restart

QUOTE
However, the Company does acknowledge the recent market releases that Ningxia
Tianyuan Manganese Industry Co Ltd has announced of its intention to plan to re-start
production at the Woodie Woodie manganese mine in Western Australia before the
end of the calendar year, following recent manganese price strengthening and positive
manganese market conditions.

Attached Image





--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
bg99
post Posted: Aug 17 2017, 12:46 PM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Aug 16 2017, 11:08 AM

OMH going for quite a run on their results from NT.... they also own a large mine in South Africe they took over from the delisted JMS
MZM has got large inferred resources if looking for a speccie punt


Said 'Thanks' for this post: blacksheep  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 16 2017, 11:08 AM
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China’s Ningxia Tianyuan Manganese Industry Co took control of the Woodie Woodie manganese mine in WA yesterday. Below is an extract of article appearing The Australian
Manganese price surge sees jobs boom as Woodie Woodie reopened
The Australian12:00AM August 16, 2017

QUOTE
Mr Jia said he expected the growing demand for manganese from the battery industry to set a strong foundation for both the mine and manganese.

“We look at the macro dynamics of the manganese industry; we see more new demand coming from the high-end manufacturing and hi-tech sectors; for example, electric cars and batteries will have manganese as a component, and we want to catch up with that to produce high-end products to supply the market,” Mr Jia said.

“For high-end products we need high-end supply.”

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/m...ce4d0418fb75e3a



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 

sentifi.com

Share Cafe Sentifi Top themes and market attention on:


blacksheep
post Posted: Jul 27 2017, 03:22 PM
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QUOTE
A new World Bank report released today highlights the potential impacts that the expected continuing boom in low-carbon energy technologies will have on demand for many minerals and metals.

Using wind, solar, and energy storage batteries as key examples of low-carbon or “green” energy technologies, the report, “The Growing Role of Minerals and Metals for a Low-Carbon Future” examines the types of minerals and metals that will likely increase in demand as the world works towards commitments to keep the global average temperature rise at or below 2°C.

Minerals and metals expected to see heightened demand include: aluminum, copper, lead, lithium, manganese, nickel, silver, steel, and zinc and rare earth minerals such as indium, molybdenum, and neodymium. The most significant example is electric storage batteries, where demand for relevant metals: aluminum, cobalt, iron, lead, lithium, manganese, and nickel— could grow by more than 1,000 percent if countries take the actions needed to keep global warming at or below 2°C.


http://www.mining.com/web/clean-energy-tra...als-world-bank/



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jul 27 2017, 03:01 PM
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extract of article - an interview with TSX Manganese X Energy, who obviously talk up their product, so might be some "hype" going on..

http://www.manganesexenergycorp.com/single...erican-Supplier?

QUOTE
Tesla turning to manganese

Tesla currently uses nickel-cobalt-aluminum (NCA) batteries for the EVs at its gigafactory in Nevada, but new batteries made from nickel, manganese and cobalt (NMC) have a lower raw material cost, reduced charging time and a longer lifespan. Manganese sells for less than $1 per pound versus around $14 per pound for cobalt, allowing for a much cheaper battery, which in a Tesla accounts for half the price of the vehicle.

The company may soon be switching to manganese-based batteries, having signed a five-year partnership with Dr. Jeff Dahn of Dalhousie University, a prominent NMC battery researcher who has been tasked with reducing battery costs for Tesla.

Other large purchasers of new battery technology are shifting to NMC batteries, including 3M (NYSE:MMM), BMW (ETR:BMW), General Electric (NYSE:GE) and Duracell.

Mills note that while Tesla gets all the hype when it comes to EVs, there are other gigafactories being built in China and India that are all planning to use manganese in their electric car batteries.

He says that Tesla’s current choice of cobalt as a battery ingredient is problematic, not only for its expense, but due to its fragmented supply line. “If Tesla was to build their batteries with cobalt, they would need something like 30 different mines because none of them are primary producers. Cobalt is basically pricing itself out of the market.”


http://investingnews.com/daily/resource-in...e-supply-chain/



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jun 26 2017, 08:39 PM
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Everyone is pumped re lithium, cobalt and, to a lesser extent, graphite, but a number of articles are suggesting manganese is being overlooked, as is copper and nickel.

At last month's Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Metals, Mining & Steel Conference in Barcelona, Glencore's Ivan Glasenberg made the following comments during his presentation.....

“The electric vehicle revolution is underway and its impact is likely to be faster than expected – potentially creating material new sources of demand for enabling underlying commodities,” Glasenberg said in his presentation.

As well as cobalt and lithium, he also cited copper, nickel and manganese as metals to benefit.

Glencore is already one of the world’s leading producers of cobalt, nickel and copper, with the recent jump in cobalt making it the company’s top four earner behind coal, copper and zinc.

Glasenberg noted that the commodities that would fuel maturing commodities were changing.

“The looming EV/ESS revolution looks set to unlock material new sources of demand for enabling underlying commodities,” he said.

Glencore said almost all automotive players were accelerating their investment in, and adoption of, EV technologies, as governments around the world set aggressive emissions targets.

Glasenberg said the impact of electrification per vehicle was around 160 kilograms of copper, covering the battery, charging point and car itself.

If major countries meet their targets of 13.4 million EVs by 2010 and 52 million by 2025, that would have a drastic impact on metals, he said.

The 2020 target equates to an additional 373,000 tonnes of annual copper demand and 40,000t of nickel demand.

By 2025, those numbers would grow to 1.65 million tonnes of copper and 210,000t of nickel.

A scenario in 2035 where around 95% of global cars were electric would require more than 20Mt of copper, 1.8Mt of nickel and 679,000t of cobalt.

Glasenberg said this would present a challenge for the copper market, which was fighting aging assets, declining grades and a lack of investment.

He said copper supply would peak next year and decline thereafter at a 3.5% compound annual growth rate with no investment, with the copper project pipeline below pre-supercycle levels.

More broadly, in the short-term, Glencore believes there is scope for “cautious optimism”.

“Despite market concerns around Chinese monetary tightening, a repeat of the extreme weakness seen in 2015 appears less likely given stronger external demand and higher private sector investment,” it said.

Glencore estimates demand to grow across most commodities this year, with a forecast 4% CAGR in aluminium and nickel demand.


http://www.miningnews.net/energy-minerals-...-us-glasenberg/

Glencore's Barcelona presentation - http://www.nussir.no/articles/2017-05-16%2...20Barcelona.pdf

Another interesting article.......

http://www.mining.com/web/manganese-the-th...take-advantage/





--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
 



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