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BLT, BENITEC BIOPHARMA LIMITED
theadder
post Posted: Sep 14 2004, 10:49 AM
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Nucleonics challenges Benitec's patent validity

http://www.drugresearcher.com/news/news-ng...llenges-benitec

 
jarm
post Posted: Sep 1 2004, 05:10 PM
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Just read an article in the current issue of PharmaGenomics on the application of SiRNA to therapeutic antibody development (the current generation of blockbuster drugs such as Herceptin for some breast cancers, Humira and Remicade for rheumatoid arthritis and so on. The applications are expanding dramatically and so more license deals with BLT are inevitable. The market will eventually tweak to its value, probably in a rush.

jarm

 
jarm
post Posted: Aug 26 2004, 05:35 PM
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In reply to: thedabbler on Wednesday 25/08/04 07:15pm

Trade is still thin and a new investor seeing the light is all it takes because the stock is tightly held. Well worth holding for the medium term. It could easily double in a few trading sessions with a change of sentiment.

jarm

 
thedabbler
post Posted: Aug 25 2004, 07:15 PM
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In reply to: jarm on Wednesday 25/08/04 12:50pm

Up 9 cents at the end of the day, What is the go? unsure.gif

 
jarm
post Posted: Aug 25 2004, 12:50 PM
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Now might be a good time to top up the BLT while there is some increased trade. The news keeps improving.

jarm

 
thedabbler
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 08:51 PM
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Thanks for that cool.gif

 


theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 08:31 PM
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some more info dabbler...the two UK patents mentioned

short details...

GB2377221

Form NP1 Application No GB0224195.8 filing date 16.03.2001

Lodged on 17.10.2002

Priorities claimed:
17.03.2000 in Australia - PQ6363
24.01.2001 in Australia - PR2700

PCT NATIONAL PHASE
PCT Application PCT/AU2001/000297 filed on 16.03.2001 in English
Publication No WO2001/070949 on 27.09.2001 in English

Title GENETIC SILENCING




GB2353282
Form NP1 Application No GB0024727.0 filing date 19.03.1999

Lodged on 09.10.2000

Priorities claimed:
20.03.1998 in Australia - doc: PP2492
20.03.1998 in Australia - doc: PP2499

PCT NATIONAL PHASE
PCT Application PCT/AU1999/000195 filed on 19.03.1999 in English
Publication No WO1999/049029 on 30.09.1999 in English

Title CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION




 
thedabbler
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 08:23 PM
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Thanks jarm!

 
jarm
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 06:10 PM
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Dabbler, here is a release today showing the extension of their patent coverage - it is inexorable and the added licensing deals will put pressure on the sp once the market understands the technology's applications. As with all such stock I am slightly reticent to buy unless there is some upward trend but the current prices look ridiculously cheap. I'm not adding at present because of lack of available funds spent on other good prospects such as PTD. Maybe next month!

jarm



BENITEC SETTLES INFRINGEMENT LITIGATION AGAINST GENSCRIPT
WITH NON-EXCLUSIVE WORLDWIDE LICENSE TO MAKE AND SELL
ddRNAi PRODUCTS
BENITEC ANNOUNCES GRANT OF SECOND UK PATENT
24 August 2004
Benitec Ltd (ASX:BLT) today announced that it has settled its pending patent infringement case
against Genscript and as part of the settlement, Genscript has taken from Benitec a world-wide
non-exclusive license to make and sell DNA-directed RNAi (ddRNAi) based products. This
settlement completely resolves all claims asserted in the pending patent infringement dispute
between Benitec and Genscript that began when Benitec filed suit on March 22, 2004 in the U.S.
District Court for the District of Delaware, in the action styled Benitec Australia, Ltd. v.
Nucleonics, Inc., Ambion, Inc. and Genscript Corp., Civil Action No. 04-174-JJF. Financial
details of the settlement are confidential.

Benitec also announces the grant of its second UK patent related to DNA-directed RNAi
(ddRNAi) technology. Patent Ser. No. GB2377221, granted August 18, 2004, claims
compositions and methods for using ddRNAi expressed as hairpins in vertebrate animal cells.
Benitec's first UK patent, GB2353282, granted in June 2003, claims compositions and methods
using ddRNAi in vertebrate cells, tissues and organs generally. This brings the number of issued
patents in Benitec's patent estate to eight.
John McKinley, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Benitec Limited said, "I am pleased
that we have again been able to settle an infringement dispute by the granting of a non-exclusive
license to Genscript. Based upon our expanding issued ddRNAi patent estate, we are committed
through our licensing strategy to enable the widest use of ddRNAi in both products and research
licenses and to protect both Benitec and our ddRNAi licensees."



 
theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 03:37 PM
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Brain Disease Blocker

08.24.04

Huntington's Disease is a devastating inherited disorder in which brain cells are genetically programmed to degenerate. The disease, which can cause dementia, memory loss, loss of movement control, and ultimately death, can strike people as young as 30; there is currently no cure. But now, genetics researchers at the University of Iowa have shown they can rescue mice from a disease similar to Huntington's using gene therapy.

Humans have two copies of most genes. Huntington's disease is one of several neurodegenerative diseases in which an error in the DNA code of just one copy of a gene causes the disease. While the normal gene tells brain cells how to build a needed protein, and the bad copy results in a toxic protein that kills brain cells.

Beverly Davidson, professor of internal medicine, physiology and biophysics, and neurology at the University of Iowa, and her group treated young mice with another dominant genetic neurodegenerative disease called spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). They reported in the journal Nature Medicine that they treated the mice with a technique called RNA interference, or RNAi, which uses small sequences of the genetic material RNA designed to block the cell's machinery from making a protein encoded by a specific gene—in this case, halting the production of the toxic protein. The researchers used a harmless virus to carry the RNA into brain cells.


"This is the first time that RNA interference has been accomplished in living tissues within animals that have a degenerative brain disease," says Davidson. And the results were promising—the mice with the SCA1 gene that received the gene therapy had normal coordination and movement. "The mice are much better," she says. "The mice appear almost as if they've had no disease. We've been able to essentially halt the disease from progressing from the initiation of the therapy." In contrast, in the mice with the SCA1 gene that were not treated, the disease progressed, causing lost brain cells and movement problems.

"The first reaction I had when I saw that we could improve the behavior in these mice was, 'Wow!'" says Davidson. "It was almost unbelievable—how could the simple methods that we were using lead to such a profound impact on the disease in these mice?"

Davidson also found that the RNA interference itself doesn't seem to be toxic to normal brain cells. She is optimistic about RNAi's potential to treat neurological diseases like SCA1 and Huntington's in humans. According to the researchers, the same technique could also apply to other neurodegenerative disorders that could be halted by inhibiting production of a mutated (or "toxic") protein, such as Alzheimer's Disease.

"A year ago the challenge was how do we move from accomplishing this in cells in a dish to accomplishing this in cells in the brain, and it's delightful that we're there, we've done it," says Davidson. "The question now is how do we move it from a little bitty brain the size of the mouse brain, into human therapies. And that's the next challenge."




 
 


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