Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

255 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > »    
 
  
Reply to this topic

TLS, TELSTRA CORPORATION LIMITED
nipper
post Posted: Nov 28 2019, 08:15 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,442
Thanks: 2245


Foolish x2 post



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 28 2019, 08:15 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,442
Thanks: 2245


QUOTE
Given that TLS shares are up 2.71% today at $3.71 a share (at the time of writing), it’s clear the market is responding well to the ASX’s largest telco.

Telstra shares had a phenomenal run over most of 2019 – rising from $2.77 in January to over $4 by August. However, this momentum seemed to stall shortly afterwards, and Telstra shares have been trending lower ever since, hitting $3.40 by September and hovering around the $3.50–3.60 range until this week.

The source of this goodwill was an investor day presentation the company hosted this morning. In this presentation, Telstra reaffirmed its FY20 earnings guidance, in which it expects to see its underlying earnings before interest, taxation, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) increase by $500 million. This number excludes the ongoing impact of the NBN, which has been wreaking havoc on Telstra’s books for years now.

It appears that Telstra’s T22 cost cutting strategy, which was announced a few years ago, has been making significant progress and is on track for cumulative savings of around $2.5 billion by FY22.

What about Telstra’s dividend?
More importantly for shareholders, Telstra also reaffirmed that it expects free cash flow to come in between $3.3 billion and $3.8 billion for FY20. Whilst Telstra did not provide any guidance for its 2020 dividends today, we can look back and see the company’s FY19 dividends amounted to a cost of $2.259 billion. This indicates to me there is more than enough free cash flow to sustainably cover a continuation of Telstra’s current 16 cents per share payout going forward.

That will be good news for long-term shareholders who have endured big cuts to their TLS dividend payments in recent years.

Foolish takeaway
Nothing is certain in investing, but from where I’m looking, Telstra’s dividend payments look very sustainable at their current levels. Unless a major shock or black swan event hits Telstra down the road, I can see a path back to growth for the Telstra dividend going forward looking at today’s numbers.

Motley Fool



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Nov 14 2019, 01:13 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,983
Thanks: 751


TLS up 1.5% today.
Nothing in announcements, why would they suddenly get back in favour???
Mick



--------------------
sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
early birds
post Posted: Sep 22 2019, 06:04 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 12,493
Thanks: 1380


https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2019/09/16/dis...bile-operators/

This, in turn, would put pressure on the company’s margins and add downside risk to dividends. If, however, the court opposes the merger then this would entrench Telstra’s leadership in mobile, the broker asserts, and increase the potential for upside to ARPU in the medium term.

Furthermore, if the court decision is appealed, and court action continues, this could be construed as positive for Telstra’s near-term earnings, providing more time to build a leadership position in 5G. On a 50% chance of the merger ultimately proceeding Morgan Stanley retains a target of $3.20 for Telstra.

There are two Buy ratings, three Hold and one Sell (Morgan Stanley) for Telstra on FNArena’s database. The consensus target is $3.90, signalling 9.6% upside to the last share price. The dividend yield on FY20 and FY21 forecasts is 4.5% and 4.4% respectively.

TPG Telecom has one Buy (Ord Minnett), three Hold and one Sell (Credit Suisse). The consensus target is $6.42, suggesting -6.9% downside to the last share price.
======================================================

at cross road for TLS as well???

 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 15 2019, 10:24 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,791
Thanks: 2304


In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jun 28 2019, 10:55 AM

Not a good day to deliver bad news

QUOTE
Telstra delivers FY19 results in line with expectations,
with strong progress against T22 strategy
• Strong progress on T22 strategy in first year
o reduced the number of Consumer & Small Business plans in market from 1800 to 20
o introduced no lock-in plans across fixed and mobile and removed excess data charges
in Australia
o launched commercial 5G service
o 7.7 million (22 per cent) drop in calls to call centres
• Total Income, EBITDA and NPAT in line with expectations
• $456 million (6 per cent) reduction in underlying fixed costs
• Continued customer growth, with 378,000 net retail postpaid mobile services added including
181,000 from Belong
• Final dividend of 8 cents per share, total dividend of 16 cents per share for FY19

Thursday 15 August – Telstra today released its full year results for financial year 2019, which were in
line with guidance and market expectations and showed strong progress against the T22 strategy.

- On a reported basis Total Income1 decreased 3.6 per cent to $27.8 billion, EBITDA decreased 21.7
per cent to $8.0 billion, and NPAT decreased 39.6 per cent to $2.1 billion.
- On a guidance basis2 Total Income1 decreased 2.6 per cent to $27.8 billion, EBITDA (excluding
restructuring costs) decreased 11.4 per cent to $9.4 billion.
- Underlying EBITDA3 decreased 11.2 per cent to $7.8 billion.

The largest reason for the decline in EBITDA was the impact of the nbn, with Telstra absorbing around
$600 million of negative recurring EBITDA headwind4 in the period. Underlying EBITDA decreased
approximately 4 per cent excluding the in-year nbn headwind. To date Telstra estimates the nbn has
adversely impacted EBITDA by approximately $1.7 billion since FY16, and estimates it is around 50 per
cent of the way through the recurring financial impact of the nbn.




--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
nipper
post Posted: Jun 28 2019, 10:55 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,442
Thanks: 2245


QUOTE
"The problem is that it took 10 years between the time that the NBN was envisaged in 2009 and now, so the rest of the world has bypassed us ... ..... It is going to take us another five to 10 years to actually get rid of the damage, and it will cost another $20 billion or $30 billion in order to get where we actually need to be.”
David Soldani, Chief Technology Officer, Huawei Australia
- yeah, but we are a first world country with high costs (not China), and large surface area and sparse, unevenly distributed population (not Singapore)




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 

sentifi.com

Share Cafe Sentifi Top themes and market attention on:


mullokintyre
post Posted: Jun 14 2019, 11:22 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,983
Thanks: 751


In Reply To: early birds's post @ Jun 14 2019, 11:09 AM

Dunno EB, not a good enough chartist to make those sort of calls.
But I think you are spot on as to its rise, its the reason I bought in.
Be very interested in e roll out of 5G..
I think 5G will revolutionise the way lots of things are done.
Pity it will only be in the cities though.
I was up in central NSW a while ago, and had to downgrade my phone to 3G in some areas to get reliable reception!

Mick




--------------------
sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
early birds
post Posted: Jun 14 2019, 11:09 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 12,493
Thanks: 1380


In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Jun 14 2019, 10:32 AM

i had last little stake and set stops at 3.75. i guess the price rise on strait line is due to multiple reasons
one of them is the expectation of more rate cut to come, and peoples all chase yielding stocks TLS seems tick the box.

what about 4.25 Mick??



 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jun 14 2019, 10:32 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,983
Thanks: 751


In Reply To: early birds's post @ May 16 2019, 10:54 AM

Yo EB, run right thru that 3.80 ish target.
You still holding.?

Mick



--------------------
sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
nipper
post Posted: May 30 2019, 11:31 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,442
Thanks: 2245


In Reply To: nipper's post @ May 30 2019, 11:06 AM

CEO Andy Penn said in the statement the financial impact of the quicker pace of change were brought forward into FY19 and were the natural result of T22, the company’s transformation program. (at least it's not a 2020 vision thing)

QUOTE
"We understand the significant impact on our people and the uncertainty created by these changes,” Mr. Penn said in a statement on Wednesday. We will continue to see role reductions as we replace our legacy systems, digitise and simplify how we work, and respond to things like declining NBN and call volumes, but if a final decision is made on the proposal announced today we expect the majority of our T22 restructure will be behind us.”

“Telstra is also ahead of plan on the simplification of its structure and ways of working announced as part of T22, which as previously announced is expected to lead to a net reduction of around 8,000 employees over three years,” the company said in yesterday’s statement. Telstra today commenced consultation with employees and representative unions on proposed job reductions previously expected to be announced in the first half of FY20. This will result in the relevant restructuring cost being brought forward from FY20 to FY19.

“With today’s start of consultation, Telstra expects to have announced a reduction of approximately 6000 roles by the end of the financial year, which puts it on track to reach the previously announced net cost out target of $2.5 billion by the end of 2022. As a result of bringing these announcements forward, Telstra expects total FY19 restructuring costs to increase from around $600 million to around $800 million. While impacted employees will not be leaving the organisation until early FY20, consultation is expected to conclude in mid- June and therefore the costs will be included in Telstra’s FY19 results.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
 


255 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > » 

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING