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"English as she is spoke", Our language and its quirks
henrietta
post Posted: Feb 1 2019, 06:02 PM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Feb 1 2019, 01:25 PM

Does not sound right, and I like your version better. Too many words between "can't" and "read" .

Cheers
J

 
alonso
post Posted: Feb 1 2019, 01:25 PM
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My instinct is there's something wrong with this: "Why can't so many children read?"

But I can only make it OK for me by changing the structure eg Why is it that so many children can't read?

Trust BBC English? Nope.






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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 
henrietta
post Posted: Jan 30 2019, 04:20 PM
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And a "thumbs up" to The Australian journalist who got this right ......

QUOTE
The trio was released pending further investigation, Victoria Police Assistant Commissioner Neil Paterson said, adding that the complex investigation stretched back to August and involved allegations of corruption in sport.


Cheers
J

 
henrietta
post Posted: Jan 30 2019, 11:16 AM
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Our "would be" pollies have a distinctly minimal grasp of our language ....

QUOTE
This morning, Mr Yates said Mr Frydenberg had failed to take action on climate change. Mr Yates said the Treasurer should not be given credit for trying to get an emissions policy through the Coalition partyroom when he was environment minister.

“If he has tried to do it he has succinctly failed,” Mr Yates told ABC radio.


Sigh.

Cheers
J

 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 26 2019, 10:28 AM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Jan 26 2019, 07:39 AM

I agree. More than 100 places named after Flinders, around the country.

Was looking up a purely Australian word, emancipist... refering the pardoned convicts. One snippet I never really understood was that about half of those pardoned left Australia when the sentence was up - usually by working the passage. Female convicts tended to stay.

(Though I have an ancestor, James Blinkworth, a second fleeter; went to England in 1795 but was back in 1803, to the short-lived Port Phillip settlement then to Tassie .... and sent for his convict wife, and child, still in Sydney)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
henrietta
post Posted: Jan 26 2019, 07:39 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 25 2019, 12:59 PM

Great navigator and sailor, died young at 40 after 6 years in prison because of the France/England conflict. What a waste !!
Suggested the name " Australia".
Cheers
J

 


mullokintyre
post Posted: Jan 26 2019, 07:14 AM
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In Reply To: draughtsman's post @ Jan 24 2019, 11:27 AM

Yeah, but he will be lost next week.
Mick



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nipper
post Posted: Jan 25 2019, 12:59 PM
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The ambiguity of our language continues to amuse, especially wrt the economy of a headline
QUOTE
Captain Flinders remains found
.
He was a good navigator, wasn't he?



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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draughtsman
post Posted: Jan 24 2019, 11:27 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 31 2018, 01:06 PM

QUOTE
Nomophobia, a noun, describes the sense of fear or worry that arises when someone is without their mobile phone or unable to use it.


Surely this could have been Onophonia

redgum




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draughtsman

You don't know what you don't know

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henrietta
post Posted: Jan 24 2019, 10:15 AM
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QUOTE
There have been 20 reported fatal drownings in Victoria this summer


Begs the question, "What is a non-fatal drowning?"

Sigh.

Cheers
J

 
 


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