Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

A reminder to all members that you agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


40 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > »    
 
  
Reply to this topic

VLA, VIRALYTICS LIMITED
plastic
post Posted: Apr 1 2020, 03:29 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


Not only is such a concept presposterous, it is downright hilarious when you stop and think that it was Obama who, in one of his State of the Union speeches, declared that American biotech interests were having a Sputnik moment. Meaning, they were not only behind the rest of the world but had been usurped.

Now we have the Covid virus pandemic. Something Bill Gates warned the world about in 2015.



--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
plastic
post Posted: Mar 31 2020, 06:37 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


I guess those twin towers really did fall down all by themselves. We can attribute that to poor engineering and construction unable to withstand an aluminium can flying into it.

We should also agree that the reason DARPA (US military) is a founder shareholder of MRNA is to save lives. The concept of the US military weaponizing and initiating the use of a breakthrough technology (engineering viruses) for the purpose of national, including economic, security is preposterous.

https://www.darpa.mil/about-us/about-darpa

QUOTE
For sixty years, DARPA has held to a singular and enduring mission: to make pivotal investments in breakthrough technologies for national security.

The genesis of that mission and of DARPA itself dates to the launch of Sputnik in 1957, and a commitment by the United States that, from that time forward, it would be the initiator and not the victim of strategic technological surprises. Working with innovators inside and outside of government, DARPA has repeatedly delivered on that mission, transforming revolutionary concepts and even seeming impossibilities into practical capabilities. The ultimate results have included not only game-changing military capabilities such as precision weapons and stealth technology, but also such icons of modern civilian society such as the Internet, automated voice recognition and language translation, and Global Positioning System receivers small enough to embed in myriad consumer devices.




--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
nipper
post Posted: Mar 29 2020, 02:22 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 7,477
Thanks: 2543


In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Mar 29 2020, 01:49 PM

I thought medication delivery was an 'essential service' and supplies still get through? Maybe she just forgot to take hers ? (again?)



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
henrietta
post Posted: Mar 29 2020, 01:49 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 4,329
Thanks: 719


In Reply To: plastic's post @ Mar 29 2020, 01:42 PM

Gee whiz Plastic, that's drawing a very long bow ..........

I'm not sure that conspiracy theories are what we need right now. Crossing our fingers would be more helpful.

Keep calm.

Cheers
J



--------------------
"Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits." Satchel Paige

"No road is long with good company." Traditional
 
plastic
post Posted: Mar 29 2020, 01:42 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


If the Coxsakkie virus can be engineered to cure cancer the way VLA did it, I can't help but wonder if the Corona virus has been engineered similarly in order to create a pandemic to provide raison d'etre for state sanctioned social and economic change.




--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
nipper
post Posted: May 14 2018, 08:45 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 7,477
Thanks: 2543


QUOTE
Paul Hopper turned a company that was broke and valued at $4 million into a $500m target in less than nine years, so it’s not surprising the Australian life sciences entrepreneur says biotech is the “greatest industry to be in”.

The Sydney-based businessman has served as a founder, chairman, non-executive director or chief executive of more than 14 companies in the US, Australia and Asia, and says the $500m sale of cancer drug developer ­Viralytics to pharmaceutical giant Merck is easily his career highlight.

Mr Hopper, who chairs Viralytics, was in the Qantas lounge in Singapore the night the deal with Merck was announced in February, and he recalls it as an emotional moment.

“My wife asked if I was all right and I said ‘this is monumental’ — it was a fabulous feeling,” he says...
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/b...d7af5cac8a1c12c
QUOTE
His modus operandi is to acquire technology in the cancer field, put it into a listed company, then join the board or become its chairman. He is the leading investor in several Australian cancer-focused biotechs.

One company he founded 10 years ago is now owned by Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka Shing and it is conducting one of the largest phase-three melanoma trials in the world.

“Biotech is the greatest industry to be in,” he says.

“When I come back from a trip my wife will ask me to tell her about the geniuses I met because I meet scientists who are peering into the origins of life, looking into the greatest scourge to mankind — cancer — and they are so inspirational.”

Cancer has long been on Mr Hopper’s radar and he has witnessed the field of immuno-oncology emerge at the forefront of innovative research.

He says that for decades there was a theory that instead of just hitting the cancer directly with a drug, cutting it out, poisoning it with chemotherapy or frying it with radiation, you could get the body’s immune system to kill the cancer. He adds that it was only about seven years ago, when Bristol-Myers’ drug Yervoy was approved, that the naysayers who said you couldn’t get an immune response to kill a cancer were ­silenced.

“That was when the immuno-oncology revolution took place,” he said.

“That is the focus of a lot of cancer drugs today: how do we switch the immune system on so that when it goes out on its surveillance program like a fighter, it doesn’t fly over the cancer — it says it’s something that is nasty.”

Combination therapies are the latest trend and have increased the interest in Viralytics. The Australian listed company combined a virus with a checkpoint inhibitor, which allows the immune system to wake up. Hopper says the checkpoint inhibitors really ­kicked off the immuno-oncology craze. Viralytics, which should complete its deal with Merck in five weeks, developed a drug called Cavatak which uses a formulation of a common cold virus that has been shown to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells. The drug is being tested in combination with Merck’s well-known cancer drug Keytruda for melanoma, prostate, lung and bladder cancers.

Mr Hopper says 10 years ago the idea of taking a virus and injecting it into a patient to cure cancer was “out there”, adding that Viralytics struggled for years to find its place in the sun.

“Darren Shafren, the scientific genius behind the drug, never wavered. He believed that one day there would be a drug where a virus hunts around the body, finds a cancer cell and kills it,” he said.

“The watershed event was five years ago when an American company got a virus drug, T-Vec, approved and suddenly the world changed and it became respectable. From there our life improved.”

The biotech entrepreneur adds that Australia’s biotech industry is maturing, noting that 10 years ago none of the big US funds were buying Australian stocks in that space but now kept them on a watch list.

He says a challenge in Australian biotech is finding good CEOs, which saw many companies appoint big pharma executives.

“I have a firm view based on a lot of bad experience that big pharma execs don’t translate to a good CEO of a small biotech,” he says.

He adds that an exception to his rule is Lesley Chong, the head of Imugene, an Australian listed drug developer that he chairs.

Mr Hopper is hopeful Imugene will follow the lead of Viralytics be globally recognised for its work in the cancer space.

Imugene’s work is centred on the HER 2 receptor, which is present in about 20 per cent of gastric and breast cancers. The company is developing a B-cell vaccine designed to stimulate a patient’s own immune system to produce antibodies to repeatedly attack the cancer.





--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

Featured Stock Stories





plastic
post Posted: Mar 2 2018, 06:05 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


It seems extraordinarily naïve for a company like Merck to telegraph to the market their interest in buying VLA when they have no certainty of success at the time of disclosure. What happens after due diligence they like what they see and wish to complete the transaction? They can't expect shareholders to just roll over and accept the offer. There are a million sharks out there who will buy it up big and put in a blocking stake or try to hawk it off to a competing firm like BMS, GSK, AZ etc.

In fact, its my observation that these things are usually done in a matter of weeks and are guaranteed before being announced.

Why Merck have done it like this smacks of gamesmanship.

Something else going on in the background. I suspect this offer was put out there just to burn the shorts who had taken it down to 60c as a prelude to a cheap buy out. Which leaves the question, who were the shorts working for? What will the new offer be?






--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
plastic
post Posted: Mar 2 2018, 06:05 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


It seems extraordinarily naïve for a company like Merck to telegraph to the market their interest in buying VLA when they have no certainty of success at the time of disclosure. What happens after due diligence they like what they see and wish to complete the transaction? They can't expect shareholders to just roll over and accept the offer. There are a million sharks out there who will buy it up big and put in a blocking stake or try to hawk it off to a competing firm like BMS, GSK, AZ etc.

In fact, its my observation that these things are usually done in a matter of weeks and are guaranteed before being announced.

Why Merck have done it like this smacks of gamesmanship.

Something else going on in the background. I suspect this offer was put out there just to burn the shorts who had taken it down to 60c as a prelude to a cheap buy out. Which leaves the question, who were the shorts working for? What will the new offer be?






--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
plastic
post Posted: Feb 23 2018, 07:05 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


There would never have been a Woodside if they'd just sold out to a bigger foreign firm. Will this set a trend or is there a Woodside somewhere in this small cap biotech sector?



--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
plastic
post Posted: Feb 22 2018, 09:41 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 10,243
Thanks: 302


Option grab explained. Takeover offer.

Why no trading?



--------------------
What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
 


40 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > » 

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING