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The Ashes '09
theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 12:30 PM
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In Reply To: balance's post @ Aug 24 2009, 12:09 PM

The Old School Tie applies with the Australian Cricket team...

Everyone except the selectors know Hauritz is a "Piechucker"
As a offspinner (a prerequisite) you have to have control over
line and length, simply because yu do not have the variations
of the legspinner
Hauritz does not have that. He bowls one or two bounday ball an over.
With the short boundaries now he is cannon fodder.

Keep trying different spin bowlers until you find one.

 
balance
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 12:09 PM
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In Reply To: flower's post @ Aug 24 2009, 10:43 AM

If we had another great spinner they would have been picked... as 12th man, knowing our selectors!



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flower
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 10:43 AM
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In Reply To: theadder's post @ Aug 24 2009, 10:12 AM

Inevitably, it was Flintoff who stole the show from the Australians. He could not be the tub-thumping batsman of old in this series, while his bowling - though thunderous at Lord's - faded cruelly as the concerns about his right knee began to mount. But as a presence, and as a man who can make things happen on a cricket field, his spell has scarcely diminished. In a moment that is sure to be replayed for years on end, he gathered a firm clip from Hussey, steadied himself as Ponting hesitated fatally, then unleashed a fast, flat, unerring swing of the arm that plucked out the off stump with Ponting a foot short.
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As a permanant visitor of over 35 years, this test series was simply fantastic, and not just because the lease on the Urn changed hands once again.

Put bluntly it was cricket at its best.

Everything requires a hero, someone to inspire, and assuredly Flintoff was that man.

Australia has dominated for many years----maybe the worm is now turning, and surely thats no bad thing. As a mere observer one thing I can never understand is the Australian desire to conquer with speed, surely the guile of Warne has proved that a big place exists for quality spinners, and surely playing in England requires spin as much as speed.

The other thing that stood out was the quality of the SBS coverage, especially the commentators--chosen from a variety of cricketing nations, thanks to the four main Australian commentators who anchored the presentation with fairness and humour.

A quality event and a pleasure to watch.



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theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 10:18 AM
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England celebrate their 197-run win to beat Australia at The Oval and regain the Ashes
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theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 10:12 AM
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Mike Hussey was last man out for a magnificent, if in vain, 121
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theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 10:00 AM
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Flintoff's fling inspires England Ashes glory

The Bulletin by Andrew Miller at The Oval

August 23, 2009

England 332 and 373 for 9 dec

beat Australia 160 and 348 (Hussey 121, Ponting 66, Swann 4-120) by 197 runs

Amid scenes of delirium unwitnessed in South London since the unforgettable summer of 2005, England's cricketers reclaimed the Ashes on a tumultuous fourth afternoon at The Oval, as Australia's brave resistance - led by a century of incredible mental fortitude from Michael Hussey - was unpicked, wicket by wicket, minute by minute, until, at 5.47pm, and with an expectant crowd willing on the moment of glory, Hussey prodded Graeme Swann to Alastair Cook at short leg to spark the celebrations into life.

At the moment of victory, all of England's players rushed into a huddle on the edge of the square - all except for one, that is. In his moment of Test retirement, Andrew Flintoff's first instinct was to seek out and console the crestfallen centurion Hussey, whose 121 from 263 balls had given his side a hope of salvation, but whose careless running between the wickets during a fraught afternoon session had been the single biggest factor in their demise. By calling for the single that led to the run-out of his captain and resistance-leader Ricky Ponting for 66, Hussey is unlikely to recall this particular innings with any fondness whatsoever.

Inevitably, it was Flintoff who stole the show from the Australians. He could not be the tub-thumping batsman of old in this series, while his bowling - though thunderous at Lord's - faded cruelly as the concerns about his right knee began to mount. But as a presence, and as a man who can make things happen on a cricket field, his spell has scarcely diminished. In a moment that is sure to be replayed for years on end, he gathered a firm clip from Hussey, steadied himself as Ponting hesitated fatally, then unleashed a fast, flat, unerring swing of the arm that plucked out the off stump with Ponting a foot short.

Though the decision went to a replay, Flintoff was in no doubt. He raised his arms in his now-habitual Kodak pose, and waited to be enveloped by his jubilant team-mates. It was a moment eerily reminiscent of Gary Pratt's series-turning shy at Trent Bridge in 2005, when Ponting once again was the fall guy, and it uncorked the tensions in the crowd as surely as the champagne was uncorked in England's dressing-room some three hours later. It brought to an end an unnerving stand of 127, and it shattered Australia's collective will.

Five balls later, their batsman of the series, Michael Clarke ran himself out for a duck after a clip off the pads ricocheted to Andrew Strauss at leg slip, and Australia could not recover their poise. Though Hussey was badly dropped by Paul Collingwood at slip on 55 off Swann, in Swann's next over, Marcus North dragged his back foot out of the crease as he swung at a big ripper, and Matt Prior, having gathered well high to his left, flicked off the bails almost as an afterthought. Their target of 546 had become a distant figment of their imagination, and at 236 for 5, their only remaining hope was to bat out the final four sessions of the series.

Brad Haddin chose pugnacity as the means to reboot Australia's innings, and he signalled his intent with two fours in his first nine balls, including a fizzing cover-drive as James Anderson overpitched. But Anderson might have dismissed him three times in a single over, including a regulation clip to short midwicket that was spilled by the substitute, Graham Onions. As he and Hussey took their seventh-wicket stand to 91, an ever-anxious crowd began to shuffle in their seats. On 34, however, his luck finally ran out, as he advanced down the track to Swann and picked out Strauss with a lofted flick to deep midwicket.

It was to be the game-breaking moment. Strauss, usually the coolest of characters in the field, celebrated euphorically as The Oval erupted once more, and seven balls later, the end truly was nigh. Steve Harmison - hitherto muted on a pitch that did not suit his style - extracted enough life for Mitchell Johnson to fence to second slip, where Collingwood, to his relief and joy, finally held on. Then, when Peter Siddle played around his front pad to lob a simple chance to mid-off, Harmison had his second scalp in the space of 12 balls.

That quickly became three in 13, as Stuart Clark fenced nervily to Cook at short leg, and though Hilfenhaus averted the hat-trick with a stabbed defence straight back down the track, there was no longer any way to stem England's tide of emotion. With Harmison stalking to the crease with a predatory menace unseen in Ashes cricket for four long years, the crowd finally dared to proclaim the Ashes were coming home. Fifteen balls later, they were.

After the ease with which Australia's openers had pushed along at four runs an over on the third evening of the match, England's day of destiny had dawned with more than just a frisson of anxiety in the air. But Swann claimed the initial breakthrough at the end of his second over, tweaking a succession of sharply spinning offbreaks past Simon Katich's edge, before nailing him plumb lbw with the arm-ball.

Swann bounced for joy in the middle of the pitch as a massive roar of relief and ecstasy erupted from the stands, but almost immediately the fervour morphed into a respectful standing ovation for the incoming Ponting, in his 136th Test and almost certainly his last in England after four memorable Ashes tours.

Before he had faced a delivery, however, England had struck again, as Broad this time hurried Shane Watson on off stump and beat the inside-edge of his defensive prod. Watson did not seem best amused at the decision, but replays suggested there was nothing wrong with the appeal at all. For all of Watson's impressive form in five innings at the top of Australia's order, it was nevertheless the fourth time this series he had fallen in such a manner. Food for thought as he works on his new career as an opener.

At 90 for 2 and with a jittery Hussey at the crease, England swarmed onto the offensive, with Swann camping four men around the bat at all times and at one stage sending down 28 dot balls in a row as Hussey prodded and smothered with desperate determination. At the other end, Ponting's eagerness to play the pull was tempered by his wariness of the vagaries of the wicket, although whenever he was tempted, he executed the stroke with the mastery that has made it his calling-card for the past decade.
In the first over after lunch, Ponting laced a first-ball full-toss from Broad through the covers for four, then tickled Swann around the corner to bring up a battling and brilliant half-century from 76 deliveries. Broad subsequently received a warning for running on the pitch to deepen the crowd's growing concerns, who had just seen Collingwood at slip parry a rare Ponting edge with his left boot. But then up popped Flintoff, and once he'd had his say, there was no holding back the inevitable.

Andrew Miller is UK editor of Cricinfo


Andrew Flintoff celebrates his run out of Ricky Ponting that sparked England's march to the Ashes

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theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 09:56 AM
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yes, certainly congratulations to England who now hold the Ashes and deservedly so.

Australia has now slipped to Number 4 in the World rankingswith South Africa number one
followed by India and Sir Lanka.

So let's hope we can work our way back to the top.. sad.gif

 
balance
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 08:15 AM
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In Reply To: 29101971's post @ Aug 23 2009, 11:50 PM

QUOTE
Very well done, England and hearty congratulations.
Nah stuff 'em. lol. seriously, well done.Deserved to win.

In days (years) to come we'll look at the stats for the series and be scratching our heads and asking how the hell did we lose.
2nd thru 7th for most runs.
1st 2nd 3rd bowlers taking most wickets.
keeper, most dismissals.

Its when runs are made and wickets are taken (or not taken more importantly) as the case maybe.
That crucial match where we failed to dismiss the England tail will be a bitter memory.



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henrietta
post Posted: Aug 24 2009, 07:57 AM
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So be it. The Ashes are back in England's hands, and deservedly so. Very well done, England and hearty congratulations.

Where to Australia ? No doubt there'll be much breast beating and loud lamenting and "I told you so" type comments, none of which will be helpful in the slightest.
The selectors will have to take a critical look at themselves. The captain and players will also. Ponting has had his usual ordinary performance as captain. Does that necessarily mean he should be sacked ? None of the bowlers distinguished themselves .......... because none of them are "distinguished". And that , I believe, is Australia's problem. We simply have a mediocre bowling attack, and can't bowl sides out on flat tracks, which are the norm these days.

We can't do much about that in the short term. In the long term, cricket in Australia has to do something about losing every tall talented athlete to the ever-expanding AFL. If we can't attract the right athletic types to cricket we'll continue to have mediocre pace attacks. The West Indies lost their athletes to American sport and its dollars. The same is happening here. No doubt the problem is cyclical as well, but it is a significant issue.

Some will be bellowing , "Bring Shane Warne back ...... he'll solve all our problems." He won't. What Australia needs is tall, talented fast bowlers, a good seamer or two, and a very good spinner, preferably a leggie. This isn't going to happen any time soon.

Ponting ? Yes, he's an uninspiring captain as far as bowling and fielding decisions are concerned. Is it all his fault? No. He deserves to be allowed to decide when and where he will depart, as captain and as a player. His success as captain has declined with the loss of some of the best players the world has seen.
The decline is natural, and hopefully will be arrested in the next year or two.

So, my feeling is, that all concerned with Australian cricket need to have some self evaluation happening, and that there be some critical thinking before and rash decisions are made.

Once again, very well done England. We'll look forward to the next stoush.

Cheers
J



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29101971
post Posted: Aug 23 2009, 11:50 PM
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In Reply To: balance's post @ Aug 23 2009, 11:41 PM

Q. What's more senseless than a run-out in a Test?

A. Two successive run-outs.

The Ashes are gone and so am I. I'm off to bed. Can't see it even reaching Day 5 now. sad.gif

Can only console myself with the $1.30 I took on the Poms before today's play.



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