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COL, COLES GROUP LIMITED.
nipper
post Posted: Sep 5 2020, 11:50 AM
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From their weekly update.
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Home shopping is becoming increasingly significant with sales up more than 100% in Victoria, as is scratch cooking, inspired by the Coles sponsored Masterchef and Plate of Origin. Veggie sales, ice cream and home cooking ingredients like flour are up 20%, and coffee capsules and cleaning products are up 30%, as we all focus more on hygiene.

On the fall are beauty products as we spend more time at home, and facial tissues as there is less cold and flu about. If we are seeing more home cooks, with pubs still restricted, we are also seeing the rise of the home happy hour with Gin sales up 80%, and Rose wine and craft beer up 30%. No alcohol drinks are also proving a very popular alternative ... up 170%!




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 18 2020, 11:12 AM
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In an update for the fourth quarter, Coles said COVID 19 factors continued to have an impact on both the level and mix of supermarket sales as customers made fewer trips to supermarkets, while basket size increased significantly.

QUOTE
Following a subdued and socially distanced Easter, sales improved as a result of increased in-home consumption. Home cooking categories such as meat and poultry benefited, partially offset by declines in impulse, food to go and prepared salads.

However, the mix of sales evolved following the initial period of panic buying and pantry filling, with April and May seeing a degree of destocking in canned and ambient pantry lines. As social distancing eased towards the end of the period, customer demand again evolved with signs of increased demand for home entertaining resulting in uplifts in categories such as gourmet cheese and flowers.


COVID 19 also had an impact on Coles Online and demand for home delivery, the company said.

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Online demand and sales grew strongly in May and June with growth rates above 30 per cent supported by substantial increases in capacity both for store pick and delivery vehicles and the rollout out of contactless Click & Collect to more than 400 stores.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 8 2020, 10:35 AM
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This is what the new realities look like
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Working together

Two weeks ago the Coles chilled distribution centre in the outer Melbourne suburb of Laverton was hit with a potential crisis when one of its 600 staff tested positive for COVID-19. The centre, which distributes chilled and fresh food through Victoria and as far north as Deniliquin in NSW, was hit with massive staff shortfalls as staff called in sick and the normal workforce of 600 fell down to around 50.

The centre is now back to normal and on Monday night Coles was able to end all restrictions on product sales as business headed back to normal. At its worst the centre was five days behind and its stores faced massive shortages, with fears supplies would be as low as 10 per cent on the shelves by last Friday.

But the recovery effort highlights how business and government worked together to keep operations moving.

In this case, daily meetings including National COVID Coordination Commission (NCCC) member Paul Little, the head of Victoria's Jobs Department Simon Phemister and Coles supply chain operations boss Tony O'Toole were held to ensure supplies kept up.

One of Little's tasks was to talk with the folk at Linfox and Toll, who are existing logistics suppliers, to ensure staff could be diverted to Laverton to help the process.

Unions and health officials were on the job, and the process was a team effort which included where possible bypassing the distribution centre altogether, with suppliers like Lion and milk processor Saputo supplying the stores directly.

The DCs are lot more complicated than the old days, with sophisticated bar code readers and high lift reach trucks (three-storey forklifts) needed to work their way around.

The NCCC's task started with troubleshooting jobs like this one, with the business representatives able to leverage their knowledge and contacts to ensure work is done.
The Australian



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 8 2020, 10:29 AM
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apart from the fact it has been bid up to $17.50
QUOTE
with current situation .... TLS might have been a relatively safe bet.
We could expect COL to come out with solid numbers, come August. And even be treated to a dividend surprise.


Second wave of Covid is seeing more shelf emptying



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 12 2019, 12:26 PM
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COL now pushing through $15.
(and with WES at $39, and gone ex-dividend, that's quite impressive $45 in the old pre-spinoff money)

(don't mention Kaufland/ Costco/ Aldi/ Amazon)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 22 2019, 10:16 AM
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QUOTE
Performance summary (retail calendar basis)
â–ª Full year Group sales revenue (excluding Fuel sales and Hotels) increased by 3.1% to $35.0 billion
â–ª Delivered 47th consecutive quarter of Supermarkets comparable sales growth
â–ª Supermarkets EBIT growth of 2.2%; Group EBIT down 8.1% due to lower Express fuel volumes and corporate costs associated with being a standalone ASX company
â–ª 30% online sales growth generating $1.1 billion in sales revenue, and first operating profit in FY19
â–ª Strong cash realisation of 110% and robust balance sheet with net debt position improving to $0.5 billion, providing significant flexibility for long term growth
â–ª The Coles Board has determined a total fully-franked dividend of 35.5 cents per share, comprising a final dividend and a special dividend which covers the period from 28 November 2018 (being the effective date of the demerger from Wesfarmers) to 30 June 2019.

Strategic highlights
â–ª ASX listed following a successful demerger from Wesfarmers
▪ Strategic refresh to “sustainably feed all Australians to help them lead healthier, happier lives”
▪ Entered into an exclusive partnership with Ocado to bring the world’s leading online grocery website, two automated single pick fulfilment facilities and home delivery solution to Australia
â–ª Entered into a partnership with Witron to develop two world class automated distribution centres
â–ª Strategic partnerships announced with Optus and SAP (HR, Procurement and Finance) to accelerate technology-led transformation of stores, support centres and supply chain
â–ª Commenced the New Alliance Agreement with Viva Energy to restore fuel growth
▪ Entered into an incorporated Joint Venture with Australian Venue Co in relation to Coles’ hotel and retail liquor business in Queensland to focus on liquor retailing
â–ª Own Brand penetration reaching 30% at year end with over 1,200 new products launched in FY19
â–ª Commenced roll-out of new store formats with Eastgardens in NSW and Clayton, Ardeer and Surrey Hills in Victoria
â–ª Progress started on Smarter Selling initiatives with Store Support Centre simplification, transport hubs in Victoria and Western Australia, and wearable technology improving efficiency in store
â–ª Improvements in team member safety and engagement scores
â–ª $115 million to communities and suppliers through SecondBite, Redkite, Community Bags, FightMND, drought relief and Coles Nurture Fund




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

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nipper
post Posted: Jun 22 2019, 05:56 PM
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QUOTE
"Time-poor customers increasingly demand solutions to feed their families easily without compromising on quality, value or nutrition."
Steven Cain, CEO, Coles Group Ltd

“There has been no notable lift in consumer sentiment after the May federal election, though the onset of colder weather has been the welcome boost for sales.”
Rob Scott, MD, Wesfarmers

“I do see the next five years in the grocery sector as the most competitive that we will ever see. The combination of existing players getting better, new players coming to town and consumers fragmenting means there is quite a challenge out there to maintain market share and grow profitability.”
Steven Cain, CEO, Coles




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 29 2019, 05:48 PM
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QUOTE
Coles sees a "tale of two cities" emerging among Australian consumers, who are split between those doing it tough and seeking lower prices and those willing to pay more for convenience.

The supermarket said on Monday that its sales grew 2.4 per cent on a comparable basis in the third quarter, driven up by higher fresh food prices and another successful toy giveaway. The result, which was in-line with analysts’ expectations, came as prices ticked up 0.9 per cent - a swing from 0.8 per cent deflation in the same quarter a year ago.

Coles’ chief executive Steven Cain said inflation was driven by fresh food, with the price of popular items like apples, bananas and capsicums all rising due to weather impacts. Fruit and vegetable consumption was meanwhile driven by Coles’ “Fresh Stickeez” plastic toy giveaway, which came on the back of its popular Little Shop toy campaign in the first quarter.

Excluding fresh food and tobacco, prices fell 0.9 per cent in the quarter, Coles said, with shoppers who were being squeezed by cost of living pressures opting for lower-priced private label products. Private label products now accounts for more than 29 per cent of Coles' total sales, and it want to grow that to 40 per cent by 2023.

Mr Cain said there was a “tale of two cities” among Australian consumers, with a lot of families “doing it tough” and seeking out lower prices, and others being willing to pay for convenience through services like UberEats. Coles has said it wants to take a bigger share of the growing convenience market, with new smaller-format stores and by partnering with UberEats on a delivery service.

“There will be uncertainty around elections as we always know, and obviously lots of different policies out there, so obviously that will be weighing on consumers' minds,” Mr Cain said. "There’s certainly no evidence yet that people are out spending any potential tax cuts.” An interest rate cut, which is now considered increasingly likely, would make shoppers “feel a lot better” but benefit discretionary retailers more than Coles, Mr Cain said.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
alonso
post Posted: Apr 4 2019, 09:39 AM
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In Reply To: triage's post @ Apr 3 2019, 12:58 PM

Maybe you're right. On the other hand I often go into Woolies, any day of the week, for those impulse needs, and it's always reasonably busy.

Getting out is the hard part, with the checkouts usually occupied by the full basket people and the robots queued up.






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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith

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triage
post Posted: Apr 3 2019, 12:58 PM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Apr 3 2019, 10:04 AM

alonso - does sound like you're not a seasoned shopper. Both Woolies and Coles work on weekly cycles starting each Wednesday. If you stick to buying special deals from them and do a bit of stockpiling the Coles/Woolies portion of your grocery bills can be reduced by 40 or 50%. Lots of people shop on Wednesdays for that reason (Aldi also puts specials out on Wednesdays and Saturdays). Then you have the pensioners and other welfare recipients (and public servants?) that get their money on a Thursday and of course the double income families have little choice but to shop on weekends. Tuesdays are at the end of that cycle so yeah the supermarkets can go a tad quiet. (I've never actually seen stats to back all this up but generally speaking Tuesdays are the quiet day in retail). rolleyes.gif



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

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