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China the monster.
Pendragon
post Posted: Yesterday, 10:16 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 21 2021, 12:10 PM

Agree with you about the chips.
But it is not only the chips, but the quality of graduates produced by the Universities.
Sadly over the years I have witnessed a dumbing down of our graduates.

Our education system is flawed and needs to be fixed.
The quality of students coming out of our high schools is laughable.

Bunch of first years starting uni in the next few weeks. Will be interesting to see how this bunch of Covid graduates stacks up with last years mob.

 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 21 2021, 12:10 PM
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paraphrasing von Clausewitz : Technology is the continuation of politics by other means.

The Pivotal Fight between China and the US is Over the Microchip


https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2021/01/15/the...-the-microchip/
QUOTE
China makes less advanced microchips and relies on more advanced US supplies. China is aware its inferior chipmakers make the country vulnerable amid the 'decoupling' between China and the US that is centred on technology. Beijing thus intends to become the best and selfsufficient in the pivotal microchip industry.

Microchips form the key battleground in the rivalry between Beijing and Washington because the integrated circuit, a piece of silicon that contains nanoscopic electronic circuits, ranks with the internal combustion engine and electricity as an invention of consequence for everyday life.

As Beijing and Washington see it, the country with the best 'brains of computers' will dominate biotech, business, cyberwarfare, economic, military and other fields. Both will mobilise vast financial and political resources to ensure their microelectronics industry is the world's best .... and China is behind in production facilities and technical knowhow in this US private sector dominated industry..........




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  Pendragon  
 
Mags
post Posted: Dec 31 2020, 12:07 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 30 2020, 11:02 AM

You make valid points: I was just responding to why it hasn't tanked. Because it's more than just our trade with China, and all your points back this up.
Australia couldn't go broke if it tried: Look at the idiots in Canberra, for over a decade we've had no end of idiot leaders and policy changes, none of which has really impacted the country on a 'foreign' economic stand point. Our resources allow us to vote for idiots that promise us the best personal 'payout'.
Shorten losing the last election on the back of serious taxation reforms, just proves that: Too many people worried about paying tax, let someone else pay it.



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 30 2020, 11:02 AM
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In Reply To: Mags's post @ Dec 30 2020, 09:20 AM

All currencies are fiat currencies, so the AUD is not alone there.
The AUD is the fifth most traded currency in the world.
The level of trading far exceeds the level of trading of goods in Oz.
For many external investors, the AUD is a proxy for commodities.
It matters little what the reality is, its all about the market.
As someone once said,bthe market can remain irrational fR longer than an individual can remain solvent.
Mick



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Mags
post Posted: Dec 30 2020, 09:20 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 29 2020, 04:29 PM

QUOTE
What I dont understand is why the AUD has not tanked, given our largest trading partner is going out of its way to damage pretty much every industry it can.


Because the media have tricked you into believing the AUD$ is based on trade.
It's not.
It's based on two things:A: FIrstly, fiat currency: The ability of the government to pay it's obligations (ie. bond holders) via controlling and taxing it's citizens (Compare Aus. to Greece.... Yeah, we do it very well)
B: It's not the trade surplus/deficit that's important, but the ACCOUNT surplus/deficit. Our superannuation industry has pushed our account surplus to the stratosphere. Australia is now able to act like a spoilt trust fund kid: The money is going to always roll in :/


 
henrietta
post Posted: Dec 29 2020, 06:30 PM
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With Trump gone , I think China figures it can do whatever it likes.

I'm hoping they screw up their iron and steel making with second grade coal wrecking their furnaces.

Cheers
J



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"Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits." Satchel Paige

"No road is long with good company." Traditional

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nipper
post Posted: Dec 29 2020, 05:17 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 29 2020, 04:29 PM

all the while, others are playing their games:

QUOTE
The EU and China are close to reaching a long-awaited business investment deal, according to media reports.

The pact, expected to be finalised this week, will give EU firms better access to the Chinese market and improve competition conditions.

Talks on the investment deal began in 2014 but have been stuck for years over a number of issues.
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-55464564


with Brexit a done deal, maybe the anglosphere will reconvene?
(Germany is the biggest trader of finished goods, mainly machinery, to the Chinese.... good luck for continuous growth)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 29 2020, 04:29 PM
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Things going peZr shaped quite rapidly.
China has added timber products and wheat to its list of banned products.
Perhaps its time that the FEDs put a bigger royalty payment on iron or e to china to help pay the industries the bastards have screwed.
What I dont understand is why the AUD has not tanked, given our largest trading partner is going out of its way to damage pretty much every industry it can.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 22 2020, 07:49 PM
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Back on theme

QUOTE
Somewhat paradoxically, and perhaps optimistically, another winner in 2020 could well be democracy and the open, transparent and market-orientated business model it espouses to maximise prosperity and safeguard liberty.

Highly motivated private companies Moderna, Pfizer and AstraZeneca, working with researchers around the world, have delivered us three effective and safe vaccines in record time.

There has never been a more galvanising event that has brought more people together through the power of instant digital communications to cooperate without fetters to better understand and seek to defeat what has been (incorrectly) perceived as an existential threat to our species.

In this context, the greatest legacy of COVID19 may be an unexpected one. It has united a once conflicted and dispersed liberal democratic order in recognition that there is, in fact, a potential existential threat: namely, the underappreciated ascension of an autocratic superpower that appears to want to bend capitalism to its will through any means necessary, kinetic or otherwise.

It is committed to doing so with an ideological fervour because it regards democracy, and its companion capitalism, as threats to its own longevity. To this lens, all adversaries must be eliminated or subordinated if the autocracy is to survive.

After free riding on an unwitting liberal democratic world for decades, powering its own prosperity by the very vehicle it strives to overwhelm, COVID19 has inadvertently revealed the autocracy for what it is.

Counter measures by democratic actors are now forcing it down the road of autarky, which will seal its demise unless it error corrects into something resembling the Singaporean model.

Yet error correction is something autocracies find difficult because debate, dissent and the ensuing self learning are not tolerated. This is why they make ostensibly simple mistakes over and over again. And it is why they are doomed to fail or suffer irreversible decline....

Christopher Joye


... I hope so.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
triage
post Posted: Dec 17 2020, 08:08 PM
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In Reply To: Mags's post @ Dec 17 2020, 11:20 AM

pays to follow the money .... for some sobering reading see what the big general insurers and actuaries focus on in their strategic risk reports, none of which are written for the chattering classes.



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog
 
 


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