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The Banks
Does It Get Any Better For The Big Four?
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nipper
post Posted: Dec 27 2020, 02:21 PM
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they all say this
QUOTE
Demographically, Australia is a relatively small market; but the combination of the new consumer data right (CDR) regime, which closely resembles Britain’s more longstanding open-banking framework, and a scene dominated by the relatively slow-moving big four banks has proved alluring.

The ACCC has only accredited six data recipients under the government’s consumer data right, a core policy to foster more competition in banking. Of the six accredited parties, the only bank is Regional Australia Bank (RAB).

The ACCC is assessing applications from 40 parties working through the accreditation process, while more than 100 others are engaged with the regulator about potential involvement.





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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
early birds
post Posted: Dec 17 2020, 08:30 AM
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In Reply To: BobE's post @ Dec 17 2020, 08:24 AM

not too worried about it BobE
IMHO, today is thursday [option day] , my guess is "sell odder will be matched by buy odder at 10:00 pm" it's just game that big market maker playing.
cheer it out mate!! tongue.gif




Said 'Thanks' for this post: BobE  nipper  
 
BobE
post Posted: Dec 17 2020, 08:24 AM
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Depth in NAB & WBC both over 2 million shares for sale by one seller....also the same with TAH & others.


 
Mags
post Posted: Dec 11 2020, 09:01 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 10 2020, 04:32 PM

We're on the home stretch with this currency system. By 2030 it will be different.

As you point out, 'new' money has to have interest paid on it: So if all the debt is paid down, you're left with just interest payments owing.Therefore it's a mathematically impossible equation. It is a ponzi scheme. Asset prices are now part of the ponzi scheme.I used to think it was just houses that were a ponzi (where the early investors need new investors to have the ability to pay out a return). And it sure looks that way.But it's actually the currency thats a ponzi.
Hard assets are the go: Metals, houses, cars, antiques, power stations, water supplies, gas supplies, oil supplies, mineral companies etc. The stuff that always has value is where you need to be to ride it out. There's gonna be the mother of all booms this decade.We're seeing that now, stocks at all time highs, property at all time highs, bitcoin off to the moon again etc etc.
Why? Cause there's so much 'new' cash been pumped into the system.But you can't over ride maths for ever.
We've been off gold since 1971, that's 50 years, it's been a nice run. We've built massive cities, massive supply chains, raised the standard of living, no one starves in western economies, massive progress in the efficient use of energy, massive improvements in health etc etc.Many witch couldn't have occurred without fiat currency.But history tells us, 40 years is the lifespan of a currency.
We are 10 years past that already.Central banks everywhere injecting cash just to stabilise the economies: And that's pre-covid. The fed in USA was injecting EVERY NIGHT starting in september after their repo market stated it wants interest rates at 10%.... 10% of the USA economy is zombie companies, companies that are only paying interest on their loans, no growth, no profit, no returns... so if interest went to 10% it's game over for the USA economy.
And that's where fiat fails: if it was a true market driven economy, we would have allowed interest rates to rise: But no, the central bank meddlers had to justfity their jobs (and shift wealth and power to the elite they serve).Think about it: Why is a kid in a casual job, paying the same interest rate on his home loan as a middle manager at a huge global company? Are their risk profiles the same? Hell no. Yet according to our modern system, they pay the same interest rate. The entire system is broken.It's a patch work of cover ups and crack repairs...



Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  mullokintyre  Pendragon  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 10 2020, 04:32 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Dec 10 2020, 02:13 PM

Perhaps you should view this video:
Paer from Thin air?

The problem is, with QE etc, there needs to be a counterparty. If it was so easy to just print money, everyone would be doing it.
As it is, when QE takes place, governments sell bonds to the CB to effectively print the money.
But those bonds have an interest component, as well as a capital component that needs to be paid back at maturity.
What is the equivalent in digital cash??
Why does the fact that the "printer" have to go through ever increasing level of difficulty to create each one make them more valuable?
Users have to have a level of intrinsic faith in a currency, either because of limited supply, ready acceptance, backing by some hard asset (gold) or central authority (RBA) for it to be workable.
The beauty of BITCOIN lies in its tamper proof ledger.
I am sticking to hard assets.
Buts thats a purely personal choice.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

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early birds
post Posted: Dec 10 2020, 02:13 PM
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https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/personalfin...ncy/ar-BB1bNwwV

"In the near future, digital assets will serve as a collateral for all your spending — we will assign credit limits to our users based on their wallet balance. In this scenario, you can use the card to pay your bills, while keeping your digital asset portfolio (and it’s potential upside) intact," he said.

The card, along with their exchange and even their financial services products which allows customers to get loans or earn interest on their cryptocurrencies, is part of the company's efforts to create a "crypto ecosystem" that is accessible to a broad audience.

"We have created products that are designed to support those currently not using cryptocurrency, given how familiar our credit/debit card is for traditional financial users, along with our user-friendly app, Exchange, and more," Marszalek said.

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paper money ------- plastic money----------digital money=========== create more money from thin air??

am i right?? or i'm missing something?? unsure.gif



 


nipper
post Posted: Nov 23 2020, 09:46 AM
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Banks were a big driver of the weeks gains after comments from Australian Prudential Regulation Authority chairman Wayne Byres at a banking summit gave investors hopes the dividend limit guidance would be eased. The rebound in the jobs market also lifted sentiment towards the sector.

Commonwealth Bank was the best performing bank over the week with a 9.4 per cent gain. The lender rallied 1.4 per cent on Friday after the prudential regulator returned $500million to Commonwealth Bank, reflecting the bank's work at improving its governance.

On Friday, Westpac added 0.1 per cent and advanced 8.6 per cent for the week. NAB rose 0.1 per cent on Friday for a weekly advance of 7.2 per cent, while ANZ notched up a 8.5 per cent rise for the week after falling 0.5 per cent on Friday



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
early birds
post Posted: Nov 19 2020, 08:56 AM
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Old favourites, bank shares returned to the fore on the ASX yesterday after the key regulator APRA revealed that its clamp-on dividends would be eased.

The ASX financial sector outperformed with a gain of 1.7% (the ASX 200 was up 0.5%) taking the sector to an eight-week high.

The surge by bank stocks helped the ASX 200 to the highest close in 9 months.

Australian Prudential Regulation Authority head, Wayne Byers told a Sydney finance conference that it was time to reconsider a cap on bank dividend payouts that currently prevents banks paying more than 50% of earnings to shareholders.

He said in his speech that the economic outlook had improved enough for the regulator to re-examine the cap on bank dividend payouts.

“We have deliberately never put in place guidance for a long period of time,” he said.

“Obviously we will be minded how the situation has evolved.

On the whole, I think the outlook has improved, bank capital has certainly increased, the economic situation looks more positive. I think it is time we look at the issue again.”

His comments saw bank shares rise strongly.

Shares in the Commonwealth Bank were up 2.9% to $77.55, the highest closing price since March 3. Westpac shares added 2.3% to $19.45, NAB shares added 2.1% to $22.29, and ANZ shares were up 1.3% at $22.01 at the close.

 
early birds
post Posted: Nov 16 2020, 01:50 PM
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In Reply To: Danville's post @ Nov 16 2020, 11:23 AM

you don't know how much i missed you and few others like wolverine eg....
you told me a lot of things , these good old days!!! i've got gray hair now a freaking useless old bug. time is flying!! sigh!!

i will post some US stocks rec [ from US broker] as your 4th 5th opinion soon as i got it ....

tongue.gif




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Danville
post Posted: Nov 16 2020, 11:23 AM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Oct 20 2020, 10:10 AM

graduated.gif It never gets old, does it??
One of my favorite all time clips from those crazy days.

 
 


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