Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

10 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > »    
 
  
Reply to this topic

AVG, AUSTRALIAN VINTAGE LTD
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 13 2017, 08:20 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,791
Thanks: 2307


In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Nov 13 2017, 06:53 AM

dr_dazmo

I only had a brief look at AVG yesterday.

Noticed you have followed this stock in the past - perhaps you have some knowledge you can share?



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
dr_dazmo
post Posted: Nov 13 2017, 06:53 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 2,193
Thanks: 642


In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Nov 12 2017, 02:23 PM

Hi Blacksheep,
Any idea as to the debt to equity comparison of AVG & TWE?

Thanks
Dr_Dazmo



--------------------
Always remember the Golden Rule - Those with the Gold make the Rules!
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 12 2017, 02:23 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,791
Thanks: 2307


AVG might be worth watching A MC of $124 mil, compared to TWE's $11.4 bil. Appears to be making a push into the Chinese market, which continues to grow. AVG's 2017 accounts showed their operations were negatively impacted by a one off event - Brexit and the sharp fall in the English pound - something that probably won't occur again during 2018

QUOTE
Whilst the UK continues to be our main overseas market, we have a strong focus on growing and strengthening our distribution channels in the key overseas markets of Asia and the United States. In the 6 month period to 30 June 2017, sales into Asia have increased by 60% and contribution increased by 241% when compared to the same 6 month period in the prior period. Whilst some of this increase is due to the timing of orders, it does reflect that our partnership with COFCO is the right strategy. For the full year, sales into Asia increased by 19% and contribution by 21%. We expect this trend to continue.


QUOTE
AUSTRALIA’S wine exports for the 12 months to September 30, 2017, were up 13 per cent on 2016 and worth $A2.44 billion – of which $A853 million came from sales to mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau.

The figures, released last week by Wine Australia, the Federal Government statutory authority for wine, showed Greater China was our most valuable export market and had registered a 42 per cent increase during 2017. It dwarfed the value of our other four top markets, with the US yielding $A461 million, the UK $A349 million, Canada $A184 million and New Zealand $A75 million.

In volume terms, the UK was our biggest market with 28 per cent of the total, followed by the US with 23 per cent and mainland China with 17 per cent.

ASX-listed Australian Vintage (AVL), which was founded in the Hunter in 1992 by Brian McGuigan and has many Hunter shareholders, has responded to China’s burgeoning impact on Australian wine by making a placement worth $A16.5 million of 15 per cent of AVL’s existing capital (35,959,389 shares) to Vintage China Fund.

Vintage China director, Dixon Jiang Yuan has become an AVL director, joining existing board members Richard Davis, Neil McGuigan, Perry Gunner, Peter Perrin, John Davies and Naseema Sparks.

The deal provides an exclusive distribution agreement with Vintage China Fund for the supply of AVL wines to China and includes a partnership with China’s largest online wine retailer, YesMyWine.

AVL says it will use the $A16.5 million from the placement to drive the global growth of its core brands, reduce its cost base, drive greater efficiency and develop new export markets.

Previously AVL, the parent company of the Tempus Two, Nepenthe and McGuigan brands, had clinched a distribution agreement with COFCO, China's largest food processing, manufacturer and trader.

CEO-chief winemaker Neil McGuigan said AVL had sealed the deals by ensuring its wine looked and tasted appealing to Chinese consumers, but Australian wine producers seeking sales in China needed to understand that the Chinese wine palate was just starting to develop.

“Many Chinese consumers are still mixing wine with juice and soft drink, so you need to start gently,” he told The Weekly Times.

AVL’s Australian cellar doors were getting a lot of Chinese visitors, to whom the company aimed to give the best food and wine experiences, and it had two people who spoke Mandarin working in the Hunter Valley cellar door.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/5008205/...e-deal-appeals/
http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-10-1...ts-rise/9066208
Attached Image





--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
yan
post Posted: Aug 15 2009, 12:07 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 143


avg finished with 0.17 at Wednesday 12/08/2008; up 67% finished at 0.27 Thursday 13/08/2008; up other 47% at Friday 13/08/2009.

Amazing! And I know where it will stop, 100cent, or may be bit of lower then one dollar.(Broker gave 12cents EPS FY11 ) Just don't know how long to take it get there, one day for something else.

 
pacestick
post Posted: Aug 14 2009, 10:36 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 340
Thanks: 70


In Reply To: yan's post @ Aug 13 2009, 02:06 PM

AVG continues its stellar rise with at least one fund buying an increased exposure on the positive side they have reduced debt negotiated an extension of long term debt and increased profitability at a time when much of the industry is in the doldrums for the reasons posted in my previous post. I do not know when the sp will stop its rocket like rise or why they have not been querried by the ASX on it although it would appear that investors have decided that the worst is over for AVG I believe that it will be a long slow recovery unfortunatly to many people decided that it would be agood idea to move from the city to a vineyard causing the industries huge problems through their poor research They are provinga hardy lot and although some are at last giving up we still have an excess grape crop this year

 
yan
post Posted: Aug 13 2009, 02:06 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 143


Share price is up 50% today.
And checked my profit/loss change -67% for holding and add more for three years!

I knew I will make money from avg in next 3 to 5 years time, just jumped in far to early.

 


pacestick
post Posted: Jul 5 2009, 09:15 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 340
Thanks: 70


In Reply To: pterry's post @ Jul 3 2009, 10:52 AM

A WINE glut has driven prices lower than bottled water as the industry faces an unprecedented meltdown and a fire-sale of unprofitable vineyards. The price collapse and overplanting has forced Australia's biggest winemaker, Foster's, owner of prestigious labels such as Lindemans and Penfolds, to sell 31 vineyards across the country, including 16 in South Australia and nine in New South Wales.

Major wine retailer Dan Murphy's is currently selling cleanskins for $1.99 a bottle - cheaper than some bottled water - due to the oversupply crisis that has led to some vineyard owners leaving grapes to wither on the vine.

"We've seen growers who didn't bother picking their grapes this year," said wine industry critic and judge Stuart Gregor.

"There is a huge oversupply and we have more grapes than we are selling, and prices are being pushed down."

A Dan Murphy's spokeswoman said the company had offered $1.99 bottles for short periods several times due to the supply glut.

A crisis meeting by winemakers concluded that 20 per cent of vines needed to be phased out in the next three years to re-address the imbalance, said Winemakers Federation of Australia director Mitchell Taylor.


<h2 class="heading">Related Coverage</h2>
About 1.5 million tonnes of grapes are required for the annual vintage, but this year about 1.7 million were harvested while the previous 12 months the harvest was about 1.8 million tonnes, WFA figures show.

Strong export sales led to over-optimistic outlooks for Australia's wine industry and a doubling of vine-producing areas over the past decade. But forecasts of more than $3 billion in export sales by next year have been dashed by overseas competition, an excess of cheaper wines and the global financial crisis.

Apart from Foster's, Constellation Wines Australia, which owns such labels as Houghton and Banrock Station, had two wineries and 16 vineyards left for sale after placing 26 properties on the market last August.

The fire-sale of vineyards and plummeting prices is the reality check the industry had to have, according to leading wine commentator Jeremy Oliver.

He estimated 20 per cent of land under vine in Australia was not needed.

"Some vineyards are just being left. People are walking away, which is leading to concern that disease could take over and spread into other properties," he said.

This was anewscorp report

 
pterry
post Posted: Jul 3 2009, 10:52 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1


It bounced on the 23rd on quite high volume, and is now back down to the 13c support level. It could either make a double bottom or fall further. Volume was good yesterday but today it hasn't traded. Then again, given the state of the market today, maybe that's a good thing smile.gif

 
dr_dazmo
post Posted: Jul 1 2009, 08:55 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 2,193
Thanks: 642


In Reply To: pacestick's post @ Jul 1 2009, 08:38 AM

I see more potential negatives than positives:



Rising $A making exports less attractive combined with greater Supermarket power in key UK market;
Over supply in the Bulk Wine market (in which AVG is a big player) & therefore more potential writedowns;
Small FY09 profit despite $6m of winery sale deposit falling to the bottom line (which I assume therefore is actually a trading loss);
High capital investment in Vineyards & Winery which in the current market they probably couldn't give away without contracts (which they wouldn't want to write); and
Massive debt.

I also see that a long standing Director has resigned recently, and a substantial shareholder has reduced from 11.48% to 8.4% in the last couple of days.

I could be wrong, but the scenario seems similar to Evans & Tate. thumbdown.gif

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo








--------------------
Always remember the Golden Rule - Those with the Gold make the Rules!
 
pacestick
post Posted: Jul 1 2009, 08:38 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 340
Thanks: 70


In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Jun 23 2009, 08:04 AM

I see comsec rerated avg at only 440% increase If they do 10% of that they will be doing well having said that this should be the year in which a lot of hard work pays off. Otherwise I would expect them to stand still at best

 
 


10 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > » 

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING