Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

3 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 >   
 
  
Reply to this topic

AYS, AMAYSIM AUSTRALIA LIMITED
nipper
post Posted: Apr 8 2021, 08:19 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


On 06 April, 2021, amaysim Australia Limited (AYS) was removed from the ASX's Official List in accordance with Listing Rule 17.11, after security holders resolved to remove AYS from the Official List.



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 8 2021, 09:11 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


The battle for Amaysim has taken another extraordinary turn, as obscure Sydney based hedge fund RAMCap has vowed to go directly to shareholders with its bid.
https://ramcap.com.au/




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 15 2020, 09:29 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


In Reply To: Mags's post @ Dec 15 2020, 08:36 AM

I would not go that far, with this arrangement at least. The offer is conditional on Optus deal being voted for, and hence AYS would just be a cashbox, that was then slated to be wound up. (Amaysim has already thrown in the towel and sold off its assets)
Wilson comes along and puts a bit on the table because the embedded franking credits are useful. AYS holders can either take cash at 69.5c or 1 WAM for 2.7 AYS shares, current value 83c (but only with that premium because WAM is trading above NTA).

WAM gets new shareholders (some) and enhanced FUM, plus franking credits.



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
Mags
post Posted: Dec 15 2020, 08:36 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 477
Thanks: 261


In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 15 2020, 08:15 AM

WAM are on a buying spree: My CLF is still under attack, he (Geoff Wilson) is now attempting to sabotage the board.I've never understood the 'hype' around WAM/Wilson, but now I see he is just a spruiker. Looking at the boat load of paper work he's sent CLF shareholders, you'd have to have rocks in your head to want WAM over CLF.But it is what it is, we are in a highly unstable economy, stocks are at crazy valuations: There's a big shake up in the Telco industry, the Amaysim boys are probably doing the right thing ie. take WAM's offer then dump them for cash.
I'm not impressed by WAM actions at all. If I had their shares, I'd be selling out after seeing the circus, and waste of shareholder funds in his attempt to get CLF: Which at the end of it all, is just an attempt to buy 'below' NTA to provide some 'growth' to his existing holders. WAM's shareholders display the behaviour of those in a cult....



Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 15 2020, 08:15 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


The Amaysim board has recommended shareholders accept a takeover offer from WAM Capital, after the companies entered into a bid implementation agreement under which it is proposed that WAM will make an agreed off-market takeover bid for the company.

The board unanimously recommended the offer and the directors are intending to accept the offer in the absence of a superior proposal.

Under the offer, each Amaysim shareholder may elect to receive either: 1 WAM share for every 2.7 Amaysim shares, representing 83.32 of implied value per Amaysim share; a cash consideration of 69.5 per Amaysim share; or a combination of cash and scrip.

Amaysim shares last closed at 73 a share.

The offer is conditional on Amaysim shareholders approving the sale of its mobile bueinsess to Optus Mobile.

"
QUOTE
The WAM Offer is complementary to the existing offer from Optus to acquire the mobile business. It has no impact on the existing offer from Optus, but rather, provides Amaysim shareholders with additional optionality to receive a higher return, said Amaysim chairman Andrew Reitzer.

It also removes the uncertainty in the current distribution to shareholders that is dependent on the company's ability to cost efficiently wind up and de-list.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 2 2020, 08:33 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


so much for a leading Australian online Mobile Services Provider
QUOTE
Optus has acquired the amaysim mobiles business in a $250 million cash deal.

Proceeds from the sale of the mobiles business, combined with the $115 million sale of Click Energy to AGL Energy announced in late August, will see between $207.2 million and $225.7 million distributed to shareholders.

This is equivalent to between 67 a share and 73 a share. amaysim shares closed at 67 on Friday.

There will be an additional 11 a share from franking credits.

Capital will be returned to shareholders in three distributions.

After the final distribution the company will delist from the ASX and wind up.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


nipper
post Posted: Aug 26 2019, 04:45 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


oh well. A finite number of subscribers.
QUOTE
Australia's biggest mobile virtual network operator Amaysim has blamed intense competition in the mobile market and a one-off impairment of its energy business Click Energy for a full year loss of $7.4 million. The company was battered on all fronts, recording falls in revenue, earnings, customer base and average revenue per user (ARPU) for the 2019 financial year. Earnings guidance for the current financial year was also well below the 2019 result. Shareholders will not be paid a dividend.

But chief executive Peter O'Connell said he was "quite pleased" with the result, which he said hit the higher end of the company's guidance. "Last year was as hard in mobile as it gets," he said. "We had extraordinary competition in mobile. The promotional offers by the carriers literally had no margin in them, or if they did, it was very small. ARPU got crushed. We managed to hold our margin of 34.1 per cent in mobile. And as we predicted in the half year, we started to see some change in the mobile market, which is happening as we speak. I think we got it pretty right. We battened down the hatches."

One of the first major decisions Mr O'Connell made after he took over as chief excecutive in June 2018 was to stop reselling NBN in November last year.

Underlying earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation was down 14.5 per cent to $47.3 million. Earnings in the mobile business plummeted 51.3 per cent to $15.2 million. Earnings in the energy business were up $33.2 to 24.1 million, artificially boosted by a new accounting standards.

On a comparable basis, allowing for the accounting standard change, earnings for the entire business were down 33.3 per cent, with mobile down 56.5 per cent and energy down 1.7 per cent. Amaysim lost 4.8 per cent of its mobile customer base, which ended the year at 624,000. It grew its energy customer base by 8.3 per cent to 207,000. Mobile ARPU was down 13.7 per cent to $25.30 per month, while energy ARPU was down 10.1 per cent to $128.50 per month.

“As we expected, our F19 result reflects the intense competition in the mobile market and a challenging environment in energy. Against this backdrop, we met the top end of our guidance for FY19 and maintained our market share in mobile," Mr O'Connell said. "We also commenced our investment in mobile growth in June 2019 and adjusted our energy plans to account for new Federal and Victorian regulation. As planned, we also started trialling our new disruptive subscription energy product in Victoria."

Mr O'Connell said the company had held back on its marketing spend last financial year, but since signing a new wholesale agreement with Optus to use its mobile network, the company had started spending on marketing again. "We’re ready to really grow the business over the next few years. It was a reset year, and we held our own and reset the business," he said.

Amaysim said underlying EBITDA in the 2020 financial year was expected to be in the range of $33 million to $39 million.


AYS Amaysim
$0.52 .... -23.13%



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 10 2019, 09:07 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


In Reply To: nipper's post @ Feb 22 2019, 07:38 AM

Amaysim launched their power plan today. Only in Victoria at present but likely to roll out to the rest of the country. Can pay from $80 a month upward, and add if running over, get credit if not all used in the month. Sort of, something like, a little bit, a mobile plan. In a way. Awareness would probably help in reducing Bill Shock (I'm not voting for him) .... as long as the App is accurate, not some complex predictive algorithm. Ah, smart meters, whatever happened to them?

Don't forget hourly rate is the variable; fixed connection charge is also part of the spend.



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Feb 22 2019, 07:38 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


QUOTE
Amaysim had a transformational 2018. The company retained its spot as the country's fourth largest mobile service provider with more than 1 million customers - but made more of its net revenue from its energy business.

But the shares continue to trade below $1 each - and not a long way off record lows. There's some concern about its outlook, while others reckon its balance sheet could use an equity injection. And let's not forget it's had Singtel and other potential suitors breathing down its neck.

Amaysim had bank facilities worth $138 million as at June 30, which were provided by Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Westpac. Borrowings were worth nearly $90 million on the company's balance sheet. Its syndicated facility is due to mature on March 2020, which means it is probably about the time Amaysim is due to start thinking about refinancing. And a bit more equity in the equation could be helpful when it comes to talking to banks.

The trick for Amaysim - and its bankers - would be coming up with a narrative to help sell the story. It's dropped off a lot of fund managers' radars since debuting on the ASX-boards in July 2015, and they're likely to need a catalyst to take a second look.

A new strategy – supported by a raising – could be the catalyst but there needs to be something more than what the company has been able to pitch to date. It ticks the value box - with its shares trading at 8-times FY19 forecast profit - but hasn't been able to prove it's not also in the value trap box. Its growing energy business could be a helpful carrot - but it is likely to need something more.
https://www.afr.com/street-talk/time-to-tak...20190221-h1bit7



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 17 2018, 03:28 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 8,723
Thanks: 2716


"Selling energy is just like selling mobile data": Amaysim CEO
QUOTE
Peter O'Connell, chief executive of telco-turned-energy retailer Amaysim, believes he can get customers to view electricity and gas in the same way as they view their mobile phone plans, and his company is gearing up to launch an energy product based on this belief. The new product will be branded Amaysim Energy as opposed to Click Energy, which Amaysim purchased 20 months ago, and will allow consumers to purchase a set amount of energy for a set price. Amaysim is basing this model on its core mobile data plans.

"We think the energy market is ripe for a disruptive product that will look a little bit like a data product, where you have a fixed amount of money that you pay each month for a particular amount of energy, so that you are protected from price rises that surprise you, and in particular from bill shock," he said. He said the new energy plan, to be launched in the first half of 2019, would come with a smart meter linked to the customer's smartphone.

Amaysim's unusual move from telco to energy retailer has inspired at least one other internet retailer to follow suit. NBN reseller Mate Communicate revealed last month it was also planning to make its own move into energy retail.

The launch of Amaysim's new product comes at a critical time for the $212 million ASX-listed company, after a year in which its share price halved from $2 at the beginning of 2018 to $1 when markets closed on Friday.

In October, Amaysim sold all of its 15,000 broadband customers to Southern Phone, saying the notoriously slim margins generated by reselling NBN plans meant it wasn't worthwhile. It has also stopped selling smartphones, meaning customers must already own a device when they start a mobile plan with Amaysim.

On top of this, a sudden surge in competition in the $20 billion mobile market over the past 12 months – prompted in part by fixed-line telco giant TPG's promise to enter the mobile market at the low end, which is Amaysim's patch – has put downward pressure on Amaysim's revenue.

Last financial year, Amaysim grew its mobile customer base by 7.9 per cent to 1.16 million, making it Australia's fourth biggest mobile provider. But despite this strong growth in customer base, the surge in competition meant its mobile revenue fell 7 per cent, while underlying earnings before income tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) for mobile was down 27.5 per cent.

Mr O'Connell, who founded Amaysim in 2010 and returned as chief executive in July after three years away from the firm, described these conditions as "rough".

"We're not making as much money out of [the mobile business] per customer as we were two years ago. But what we also decided was when you look objectively at what we do, we're actually a direct marketing company and we have very good skills in online marketing and ecommerce."

Mr O'Connell launched Amaysim at a time when he said consumers did not understand the complexities if this new technology. As a result consumers were sold opaque products that were poor value and often ripped them off.

"There were hidden fees, contracts that hid the real price, it used to take 30 to 60 days to port a mobile customer from one group to another, people didn't understand what they were buying. Since we've come it's changed completely," he said.

Since Amaysim bought energy retailer Click Energy, the energy business now accounts for just over half of the group's revenue. The Click brand still exists, but Mr O'Connell said eventually all energy products would be branded Amaysim Energy.

Along with cross-marketing of energy to its 1.16 million mobile customers (it currently has about 200,000 energy customers), Mr O'Connell said a key advantage for Amaysim was its commitment to transparency and simplicity – something he said was missing in the energy retail market. He said communicating to customers the practical meaning of the poorly understood kilowatt hour was a priority for the business, just as communicating what a gigabit of data or megabit per second speeds were when Amaysim launched eight years ago.

"No one knows what a kilowatt hour is, and what you get for a kilowatt hour. And also there are indiscriminate price rises in the industry. So it's extremely complex. And one of the mantras in our corporate culture is simplicity. So we actually think all of those characteristics were very like mobile 10 years ago, when we started thinking about doing Amaysim," he said.
https://www.afr.com/business/telecommunicat...20181216-h1960p



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


3 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 >

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING