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China the monster.
nipper
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 06:34 PM
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In Reply To: triage's post @ Jul 24 2020, 06:28 PM

he must have been effective, to have scored the promotion. Big League indeed. Honed his craft.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
triage
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 06:28 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 24 2020, 06:14 PM

Here's a case of local spook makes good. After playing in the bush leagues in Canberra for a number of years this chappy got called into the big league for the Houston Rockets. Yay!


https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-24/chin...tralia/12490040





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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 06:14 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Jul 24 2020, 03:42 PM

tit for tat expulsions .... Pretty normal in the rarified diplomatic world. (sadly)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
early birds
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 03:42 PM
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https://www.cnbc.com/2020/07/24/china-order...in-chengdu.html

keeps going!! things will getting worse i guess!! weirdsmiley.gif

market got head wings!!

 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 03:32 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Jul 24 2020, 03:30 PM

and not forgetting NAFTA

(One could imagine the captains of industry telling the orange parrot to dial back on the rhetoric?)



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 03:30 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 24 2020, 03:25 PM

I have always thought that it made enormous sense for US companies to shift their manufacturing from Asia to Mexico.
1. The labour costs are extremely low.
2. Relatively stable government.
3.Transport costs are reduced.
4. If there are plentiful jobs available in Mexico, there is less incentive for the Illegal Alien trade.
5. There is less reasons to get involved over the coming stoush re the south china sea.

Mick



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nipper
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 03:25 PM
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... a pervasive Western decoupling vis à vis China across major commercial and national security-sensitive industries is being validated by the day. [This could] take place through a combination of switching to other low cost countries that are more benign from a strategic standpoint (eg, Vietnam, India, and Mexico) and through domestication of supply chains.

A Bank of America survey found that 75 per cent of companies were increasing the scope of their re-shoring plans. BoA says that while each of these stakeholders is examining the location of supply chains from very different perspectives, they are ... arriving at the same conclusion: namely, portions of supply chains should relocate, preferably within national borders and failing that, to countries that are deemed allies.

And the costs of doing so are not as prohibitive as many suppose. The argument against re-shoring has always been made on the grounds of lost efficiency and ruinous costs. ... Our analysis, however, suggests that a US$1 trillion capex cycle, spread over a five year period, would support the shift of all foreign manufacturing in China that is not intended for consumption in China. This would be significant, but not prohibitive.

This will be facilitated by the application of greater automation (robotics) and artificial intelligence in production processes. We continue to think that over the medium term reshoring could be quite inflationary, which is an impulse that will be amplified by unavoidable central bank monetisation of public debts (to allow nation states to service those obligations) and the debasement of fiat currencies.

https://www.afr.com/wealth/investing/govern...20200722-p55ehh



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 20 2020, 09:53 AM
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and US Attorney General on the CCP:

https://www.justice.gov/opa/speech/attorney...rd-presidential



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Jul 20 2020, 09:50 AM
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https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/chi...biding-its-time?

Need to subscribe (is published six issues a year)

Some of the highlights.
QUOTE
Over the course of the novel coronavirus crisis, analysts have watched relations between the United States and China spiral to a historic nadir, with scant hope of recovery. There are many reasons for the slide, but Beijing, in a striking departure from its own diplomatic track record, has been taking a much harder line than usual on the international stage—so much so, that even the most seasoned observers are wondering whether China’s foreign policy has fundamentally changed.

It is too early to tell with certainty, but China, imbued with crisis-stoked nationalism, confident in its continued rise, and willing to court far more risk than in the past, may well be in the middle of a foreign policy rethink that will reverberate around the world.

In the months since the pandemic first engulfed the world, China’s government has engaged in an unprecedented diplomatic offensive on virtually every foreign policy front. It has tightened its grip over Hong Kong, ratcheted up tensions in the South China Sea, unleashed a diplomatic pressure campaign against Australia, used fatal force in a border dispute with India, and grown more vocal in its criticism of Western liberal democracies.

China may simply be taking advantage of the chaos of the pandemic and the global power vacuum left by a no-show U.S. administration. But there is reason to believe that a deeper and more lasting shift is underway. The world may be getting a first sense of what a truly assertive Chinese foreign policy looks like.

Since March, China has stepped up its patrols near the Diaoyu Islands (known in Japan as the Senkaku Islands) in the East China Sea and doubled down on its maritime claims in the South China Sea, sending vessels to linger off the coasts of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam. It has conducted aerial reconnaissance near Taiwan, effectively ended Hong Kong’s semiautonomous status, ginned up a new border dispute with Bhutan, and by all appearances, provoked a deadly border clash with India in what was the People’s Liberation Army’s first use of force abroad in 30 years. Any one of these moves by Beijing might have been unsurprising on its own. Put together, however, they amount to a highly unusual full-court press.

If there is a silver lining to the current crisis maelstrom, it may be that Beijing has pulled back its own curtain, giving the world an unsolicited preview of unconstrained Chinese might. By leaving a power vacuum in the world’s darkest hour, the United States has bequeathed China ample room to overreach , and to demonstrate that it is unqualified for a position of sole global leadership. If Washington does not return soon, however, it may not much matter how the world views China’s bumptious diplomacy; left with no alternative, strident excess will fill the void...




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: indeficit  
 
henrietta
post Posted: Jul 19 2020, 08:41 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Jul 19 2020, 05:33 PM

Hey EB, rats are good !! smile.gif

Cheers
J



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"Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits." Satchel Paige

"No road is long with good company." Traditional
 
 


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