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Ethical Investing, What would you place in this category?
nipper
post Posted: Sep 25 2017, 05:37 PM
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funds and managers that call themselves “socially responsible” ....More recently the terminology has evolved, with many claiming to pursue “ESG” investing - the acronym standing for “environmental”, “social” and “governance”.
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what really determines an ESG company? Of the three categories represented by the initials, the clearest is the first. The environmental “E” means shunning companies that produce a large amount of externalities — costs not captured in the manufacturing process — like carbon or waste or other forms of pollution. The “G” for governance encompasses an evaluation of how the company structures its board, disclosure, compensation and so on.

Neither area is straightforward. But the complexity of each pales in comparison with that involved in exploring what lies behind the “S” for social. This often involves labour rights, such as working hours, wages and fatalities, and the ability to pursue a grievance; and issues such as the breakdown of employees by gender. Hundreds of different outside services analyse how companies tackle “social” issues.

A study by NYU’s Stern School (Putting the ‘S’ in ESG) looked at 12 of the most popular approaches. It extracted from these more than 1700 different measures. Companies seeking to respond to these evaluators faced a daunting task: answering 763 questions for companies involved in food and beverages; 698 for companies in extractive industries.

A consequence is that even companies willing to complete surveys are overwhelmed by the task. And the answer they provide is often incomplete anyway, because it overlooks their supply chains. The NYU survey notes that many current approaches ignore the full supply chain and thus often the hard end of manufacturing. Or they judge companies on their stated intentions, such as promising to ask suppliers to treat labour well, without actually monitoring the results.

That this category struggles to live up to its idealistic promises justifies some scepticism. But, at the very least, it is focusing attention on the problems and hence applying pressure for a better approach.

It is also refining definitions of terms for investing that may have value elsewhere, and help replace feel-good bromides with crunchier measures. NYU is planning its own indicators for “social” factors. That it and others are exploring new approaches must, in itself, be a social good.
The Economist



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 11 2017, 08:47 PM
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Australian miners back ethical supply of minerals as illegal mining in Africa impacts gorilla habitat
ABC Rural
By Babs McHugh
Updated about 3 hours ago
First posted about 4 hours ago
QUOTE
The global thirst for the minerals needed for new technologies has unearthed the unethical practices of miners in some African countries

The demand for batteries for smart phones, tablets, laptop computers and battery storage is fuelling a tech-metals boom.

Exploration and mining of lithium, vanadium, graphite, cobalt, silver, tantalum, rare earths and the hybrid metal called coltan is only set to in increase.

Coltan is short for a combined columbite-tantalite ore that, when refined, produces becomes metallic tantalum which is used in capacitors

However there is growing concern that it is also fuelling the unethical practices by miners in some African countries.

Coltan mined in The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is called a 'conflict mineral' by human rights groups.

Andrea Shaw, the manager for the Global Mining for Sustainable Development Program with Transparency International, said conflict minerals were almost universally minerals that were mined illegally.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-09-1...inerals/8874774



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Jun 29 2017, 10:09 AM
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following a shareholder vote at the EGM of Hunter Hall International Limited,

HHL and Pengana Holdings have merged to create the Pengana Capital Group (PCG).

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The combination of HHL and Pengana creates a substantial business with in excess of $3 billion in funds under management. PCG is a highly regarded fund manager with wide ranging expertise.

With effect from 1 August 2017, the Hunter Hall Australian Value Trust will now be managed by the Pengana Australian Equities Team, currently responsible for managing the Pengana Australian Equities Fund. The investment strategy for the Fund will be changed to one that focuses on generating a high component of the return from income.

T
he Fund will change name to Pengana Australian Equities Income Fund, and will employ a research-based security selection, using fundamental company research with macro economic overlays for portfolio construction. Capital preservation will be preferred over supernormal returns.

We understand that many investors are aligned to the Fund due to the ethical approach to investing. While the PAE Team do not employ a negative ethical screen, it incorporates environmental, social and governance considerations into its investment analysis processes, if these matters impact the factors upon which investment decisions are based.

For those investors who prefer a more formal ethical process, we urge you to consider one of Pengana's other ethically screened funds, which include:

  • Pengana International Equities Fund
  • Hunter Hall Value Growth Trust
  • Hunter Hall Global Deep Green Trust (soon to be transformed into the Pengana WHEB Sustainable Impact Fund)
  • Hunter Hall High Conviction Trust.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
chance
post Posted: Jan 5 2005, 06:40 AM
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Hi All,

I would consider companies like SES Solar energy systems, and GDY Geodynamics (geothermal electricity generation) and any companies involved in wind power.

Regards

chance

 
Cris
post Posted: Aug 13 2004, 12:41 PM
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Film: The Corporation
August 15, 2004
Reporter : Peter Thompson

Peter's verdict: doesn't just preach to the converted
Director: Jennifer Abbott, Mark Achbar
Genre: Documentary

It's true that we hear these big words like “corporation", “multinational", and “globalisation" all the time now. We're bombarded by soothing messages from corporate spin doctors and we've got used to the sight of senior company executives being led away in handcuffs. But most of us know very little about where corporations come from or how they work. This new documentary tries to remedy that, tracing their history, particularly in the United States, and examining their impact economically, socially and environmentally. It demonstrates that many within the corporate world are also questioning the status quo, but one of the first ideas tossed around is the familiar notion that all the ills of corporate culture come down to a few "bad apples".

Ira Jackson of the Harvard Centre for Business and Government has a different metaphor.

Not everyone, least of all the filmmakers Mark Achbar and Jennifer Abbott, thinks that metaphors of rotten fruit and soaring eagles go very far in explaining why the pursuit of private wealth sometimes conflicts with the public good.

Mark Achbar: "We've created an institution with a bizarre set of imperatives and they are antithetical to justice and democracy and human survival on this planet. You know, I think we've made a mistake and we'd better think about how to fix it."

The filmmakers trace the origins of the corporation as a means of social organisation comparable to the monarchy, the church and the Communist Party. Specifically, in the American context, they go back to the Civil War and the fourteenth amendment to the Constitution. But critics argue that while becoming legal persons, corporations resisted the burdens of ordinary citizens who have moral obligations to their community.

The presence of Michael Moore in The Corporation will excite some and outrage others, especially following the spectacular success of Moore's own film, Fahrenheit 9/11. Mark Achbar himself makes no apology for taking a clear point of view.

Mark Achbar: I don't feel weird trying, nor do we have the mandate as kind of activist filmmakers to create a journalistic style, almost self-cancelling kind of balance … well, on this side is this and that side is that and here's another commercial. It's … we do have both sides, but there's an emphasis on one side that is our side, as it were. And that's, I think it's reasonable, in dealing with this kind of material, to have a point of view.

Much of the debate comes down to the virtue, or otherwise, of the profit motive. And the curious concept of “externalities".

As a whole, The Corporation argues strongly for a reassessment of the relationship between the private and public sectors of modern economies, but it's impossible to sum up quickly the issues it explores. Mark Achbar asserts that while agitating for change, his film gives a broad and coherent picture.

Mark Achbar: "What you see in the film are a range of responses to corporate power, all the way from insiders like Ray Anderson, the CEO of the world's largest commercial carpet manufacturing company. Um, he's no socialist, he's a market believer and he believes that market forces can, with sufficient knowledge and determination, can drive us toward a sustainable future, in terms of environmentally sensible production. You also see people like Oscar Olivera, labour activist in Bolivia, leading a huge movement of people in the street, hundreds of thousands of people who say no, we are not going to let the Bechtel Corporation, you know, through a series of subsidiaries, Aguas del Tunari being the local one, to privatise our water supply, we are just not going to put up with that, we don't think water is a commodity and it's a human right. I shouldn't be having to spend 25 percent of my two-dollar-a-day income on water, so we are not going to have that. You see people like Vandana Shiva and her seed activists fighting for the right to seeds that have been in their culture for a millennia, that they have developed, you know, being snapped up by big corporations trying to patent Basmati rice, I mean, it's absurd, right? So you see a range of responses to the externalities, if you will, to some of the harsher consequences, some intended, some unintended, of big corporations and so, I just can't see that someone would say that there is, you know, no solutions offered in the film. I mean, they are not prescriptions, they are descriptions of what people are doing. And there are several more."

The Corporation is nearly three hours long, so it requires a certain degree of commitment to experience its wide-ranging analysis. Perhaps the most surprising thing is that the film isn't just preaching to the converted. Rather than just turning their backs, many in the corporate world are making use of it to stimulate thinking outside the square. Given the fabulous wealth of the world we share and the capacity of human beings to create solutions as well as problems, there seems no good reason why we can't create a better future than the chequered past we've inherited.

For movie session times, visit: ninemsn's Movie Guide

http://sunday.ninemsn.com.au/sunday/film_r...rticle_1621.asp

 
kathy
post Posted: Jun 18 2004, 11:40 AM
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Hi Cris, I cant be of much help with ethical investing, but I would think vti would be classed as an ethical investment. I dont hold any, anymore, and I would suggest you to research first ( as im sure you would) particularly financials and cash burn etc. I dont buy for ethical reasons though, but have surprised myself ( and it was a shock) for not buying for ethical reasons when opportunity has been stareing me in the face
regards
Kathy


 


Cris
post Posted: Jun 18 2004, 10:50 AM
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Thanks Flash.

Seems regardless of how deep you go in terms of a company's operations, there could still be relevant info you've missed.

A weighted rating system could help. Not sure if this already exists but I do know it's something I wouldn't want to take on.

You've given me food for thought.

Will check out that website also.

Regards,
Cris

 
theflasherman
post Posted: Jun 17 2004, 09:44 PM
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Hi Cris

I'd place very few stocks in this category. Ethical investing is hard to define. For example, take a company like Nike. Now Nike have a reputation for using labour in third world countries, but they actually treat their staff better than other local producers and pay their staff more than the going rate in those countries. Yet Nike have a bad reputation for using this labour. But also, Nike are helping to raise the living standards by giving people work in those countries. Nike are more responsible because they have to be in the capitalist system.

Now, I'm not affiliated with Nike, but IMO they do fit the ethical investing brand.

I even think some mining companies would do the same, bringing jobs and prosperity where it never existed before. Can you imagine the middle east without the oil money? I would only say that governments should make sure that these mining companies pay the true cost, including environmental controls and cleanup.

In other words, I think any company can be ethical and needs to be assessed on it's merits.



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[b]Later, Flash[/b]
 
theflasherman
post Posted: Jun 17 2004, 09:39 PM
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check out:

www.ethicalcorporation.com

Had a beer with the guy who runs it the other night. A great source of ethical corporation related news. It helps me sooth the socialist bones in my body from time to time.

You need to sign up but it is free.



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[b]Later, Flash[/b]
 
theadder
post Posted: Jun 17 2004, 07:26 PM
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oavde...was you the "STRUMMER" for MIDNIGHT OIL

OILS aint OILS..."O"

 
 


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