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SMN, STRUCTURAL MONITORING SYSTEMS PLC
ChromeDome01
post Posted: Feb 16 2020, 10:18 AM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Feb 14 2020, 06:35 AM

Congratulations Mr Lewis on a great career. I have personally followed your career since AEM & SMN united as one.

It must be one big disappointment from your perspective in the Aviation Industry slowness towards implementing "Safety"

Since December 2015, Boeing and Delta with the backing of FAA, recognised CVM sensor technology as an alternative measure in aircraft fuselage crack testing monitoring maintenance tool for safety.

After nearly five long years of further testing by Sandia Labs, CVM technology is still sitting at the gate, with so much promise and with aircraft falling out of the sky, it must be seen by many in the aviation industry in whether "Safety" is FAA number one focus?

Unfortunately for you and I, 99% of the worlds population are sheep, and cannot think for themselves. They rely on the 1% to implement the right decisions. Unfortunately for us, FAA are not implementing anything towards safety, as far as I can see.

To not implement new technologies is the "Better Way" forward to more tragedies!

GLTA


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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Feb 14 2020, 06:35 AM
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Hi All,I see that AEM Business Development VP, Ray Lewis, has retired after 39 years in the industry.Well done, and congratulations to him!
Dr_Dazmo
https://www.skiesmag.com/press-releases/aem...space-industry/
<h1 class="entry-title" id="#content" tabindex="-1">AEM’s Ray Lewis retires after 39 years in aerospace industry</h1> Posted on January 23, 2020; Anodyne Electronics Manufacturing Press Release







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mullokintyre
post Posted: Feb 2 2020, 05:24 PM
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In Reply To: ChromeDome01's post @ Feb 2 2020, 12:39 AM

Whatever Delta have installed on existing aircraft have either had FAA approval, or were deemed to be a minor change that does not affect the performance, handling characteristics, loading etc of an already certified aircraft.
The fact that Delta have already installed 19 CVM kits does not preclude them having had FAA approval prior to installation.
The original 19 may have been done by field approval whereby a single serial number is approved.
This is often the approach taken by manufacturers to effectively put a single aircraft into testing phase before a blanket approval, namely an STC is issued.
Dr Daz is quoting an STC, which must be approved by the FAA before the aircraft can fly as RPT.
Depending on who owns the STC (Boeing, Delta or even AEM), will determine whether it is rolled out to all 737 aircraft.
Any other organisation (namely other airlines if Delta owns the STC) must negotiate with the holder of STC to get approval to quote it when installing something that was not part of original equipment list.
Mick



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ChromeDome01
post Posted: Feb 2 2020, 12:39 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Feb 1 2020, 04:40 PM

Hello Mull, have you been following all the news over the last 5 years?

Delta Airlines have already installed CVM kits on 19 x B737-NG aircraft on the AFT application in 2019.

How about that for "Never" installing CVM kits on aircraft without FAA approval?

How about the CVM sensor kits Delta Airlines fitted on at least 3 x B757 aircraft in 2019?

It's all in the application as they say.





 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Feb 1 2020, 04:40 PM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Feb 1 2020, 10:59 AM

Sorry Dr Daz, no airline is going to install anything without FAA approval.
Airline maintenance just doesn’t work like that.
Mick



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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Feb 1 2020, 10:59 AM
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Hi All,
Looks like Mr.Market wasn't particularly impressed with the December quarterly.
I assume it revolves around the CVM approval timeline, and the possibility that some traders (?) moved in based on expectation of approval early in 2020 only to be disappointed.

Overall I thought the quarterly was pretty good.
AEM business is performing better than expected in the first half, and looks like that will continue in the second.
I understand that AEM isn't the main event, but it's looking like a nice little earner which will help pay the bills.

Obviously the main event is CVM, and the FAA isn't going to be rushed, no matter how much we'd like them to.
Any approval process involving a Govt department is never going to be simple exercise!
I'm sure some still remember waiting for the FDA to approve Quantiferon-Gold "soon"... wacko.gif

Now, I could be reading too much into the quarterly, but I've had a couple of re-reads, and suspect there may be some potential silver linings.


Immediately upon STC approval - SMS will rapidly engage commercially with several airline operators to both schedule and actively install CVM equipment on operating fleet aircraft. Delta Air Lines ("Delta") has requested, and SMS has already provided, preliminary kit pricing for the B737-NG WiFi Application for Delta's engineering and budgetary approval. Once approved by Delta, SMS expects installs on the Delta B737-800 fleet.


I believe that Delta currently have 77 B737-800 aircraft in service, but are also a relatively modest operator.
American airlines operate 304, Southwest 182, United 141 & Ryanair are the largest operator in the world with 400.
rolleyes.gif

Does the quarterly raise the possibility that Delta may choose to proceed with installations ahead of FAA approval?
They have already set that precedent with the B757 installations..

Call me an optimist, but if FAA approval is just a formality (and I believe that it is), and I had aircraft receiving regular "in hangar" maintenance anyway, I'd probably reduce my overall time out of service, and install some CVM sensors (which are sitting in stock at AEM) in advance of approval.
Maybe that's just me?

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo





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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Jan 27 2020, 11:16 AM
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Hi All,
Haven't seen any development on CVM front (yet), but see that AEM are still kicking some goals.

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo


https://www.helis.com/database/news/loudspeaker-s-70i-firehawk/

AEM Loudspeaker System for S-70i Firehawk

AEM, January 24, 2020 - Kelowna, BC - Anodyne Electronics Manufacturing Corp. (AEM), a subsidiary of Structural Monitoring Systems Plc. was selected to supply the loudspeaker systems for seven new Sikorsky S-70i Firehawk helicopters, three of which were delivered to California in December.

United Rotorcraft and Sikorsky selected AEM’s LS1320 loudspeaker system to provide air-to-ground communication for the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire), the Los Angeles County Fire Department (LACoFD) and the City of San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, with more Firehawk systems on order.

The new S-70i aircraft is outfitted with specialized equipment to meet the demands of California’s growing wildfire challenges, including a newly designed water tank, 600 lb external rescue hoist, a 9,000 lb cargo hook and a 1,320-watt loudspeaker system from AEM.

“We’re excited and honored to be the external loudspeaker provider of choice for the Firehawk program” said Steve Broderick, Sales and Business Development representative at AEM.

AEM is the leading supplier of loudspeaker systems for a wide-range of special-role aircraft, providing intelligible external audio for search and rescue, law enforcement and military agencies.

“Fire fighting missions place helicopters into some of the most extreme conditions known to the aviation business” Broderick continued, “the AEM team designs, qualifies and manufactures extremely robust, effective avionics equipment. Our loudspeaker systems are loud, they are clear, and they can withstand anything you can put your aircraft through.”

United Rotorcraft and Sikorsky are expected to deliver more than a dozen S-70i Firehawk aircraft in the next two years.

About AEM: Anodyne Electronics Manufacturing Corp. (AEM) is a leader in the design, development and manufacture of aircraft communication systems, loudspeaker systems, caution/warning panels and illuminated panel products.

AEM also offers design and manufacturing services to other companies, providing solutions for reduced operational costs and giving those companies the ability to focus on their core businesses. AEM is a Transport Canada approved manufacturer and maintenance organization, holds EASA Part 145 Maintenance approval, and is ISO9001/AS9100D registered. (aem-corp.com).

AEM is a wholly owned subsidiary of SMS Canada Corp, part of the Structural Monitoring Systems plc (ASX Code: SMN) companies



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 28 2019, 07:16 PM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Dec 28 2019, 11:21 AM

This looks like a similar accident to another few that have occurred with the F100 in the past.
Performs extrermely poorly with ice on the wings and control surfaces.
Weather at the time had the temp at -12 , - 13 well below the dew point with high probability of clear ice forming.
A Palair F100 crashed on takeoff in 1993. Dutch investigators attributed the cause due to ice formation on the wings.
A crash at LAgardia was similarly atriributed to wing ice.

QUOTE
But the preliminary results of a Canadian investigation into an F28 crash three years ago in Dryden, Ontario, indicate that the design of the Fokker F28's wings requires extra caution during cold, wet weather, so that the wings are kept clear of ice. The Dryden accident, like the crash at La Guardia Sunday, occurred shortly after takeoff in a snowstorm.

On most modern commercial jets, a slat at the front of the wing slides forward and down shortly before takeoff. This increases the length of the top side of the wing so that more air takes the shorter route under the wing, providing lift.


Laqgardia Crash

After the loss of an f100 operated by an Air France subsidiary, the Eauropean Aviation Safety Agency mandated the fitting of on ground wing leading edge heating systems ".
EASA
QUOTE
It notes: "During the last few years at least two serious winter operation events with [the aircraft] are known to have occurred, associated with leading-edge ice contamination, as a result of which the two aircraft were written off.


Its early days yet, but the cicrumstances of the weather , the aircraft and behavior of the aircraft in these conditions bear many similar characteristics.

Mick





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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Dec 28 2019, 11:21 AM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Dec 28 2019, 11:04 AM

Hi All,

Wikipedia indicates that the Fokker 100 is very popular in Australia with Virgin Australia Region Airlines operating 17 aircraft & Alliance Airlines operating 24 in addition to the Qantas Link 17.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_100


Current operators


As of July 2017, 113 aircraft were still in operational use with airlines.[1][34] Many of them are used in Australia by Alliance Airlines, Virgin Australia Regional Airlines and QantasLink in support of the mining industry, with low utilisation rates for an airline, around 1,200 hours per year.[35]

Air Niugini (7)
Air Panama (5)
Alliance Airlines (24)
Avanti Air (2)
Bek Air (6)
Carpatair (3)
Iran Air (16)
Iran Aseman Airlines (20)
IRS Airlines (2)
Karun Airlines (4)
Kish Air (3)
Montenegro Airlines (2)
QantasLink (Network Aviation) (17)
Qeshm Airlines (4)
Skippers Aviation (2)
Trade Air (2)
Transwisata Air (1)
Tus Airways (2)
Virgin Australia Regional Airlines (14)

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo




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Always remember the Golden Rule - Those with the Gold make the Rules!
 
dr_dazmo
post Posted: Dec 28 2019, 11:04 AM
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Hi All,

Sad to see the tragic crash of a Fokker 100.

https://www.9news.com.au/world/kazakhstan-p...1e-d9e8d6c4b59d

One survivor told local media outlet Tengrinews that she heard a "terrifying sound" before the plane crashed, Reuters reported.

Investigation into cause of crash underway

The cause of the incident was under investigation, the aviation committee said in a statement published online. As a precautionary measure, authorities said that all flights using the Fokker 100 aircraft would be temporarily suspended until the circumstances of the crash were made clear. The Fokker 100 is a medium-sized twin-turbofan jet often used for short haul flights.


I'm pretty sure I've flown on this type of aircraft, with 17 aircraft currently in the Qantas Link (National Aviation) fleet. blink.gif

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QantasLink

Hope they get to the bottom of any issue(s) quickly!

Cheers

Dr_Dazmo






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Always remember the Golden Rule - Those with the Gold make the Rules!
 
 


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