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Renewable Energy, Alternative energy, New energy, Solar, Geothermal, Wind
bg99
post Posted: Nov 22 2020, 08:39 PM
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In Reply To: Mork's post @ Nov 22 2020, 09:44 AM

OK cool Mork, we think alike.
Was just rrying to point out to anyone that has even no consideration for the environment, that economically nuclear doesn't even comes close to being viable. Any govt that pushes this barrow is well..... certifiable


 
Mork
post Posted: Nov 22 2020, 09:44 AM
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In Reply To: bg99's post @ Nov 21 2020, 05:16 PM

I don't think nuclear is the way to go either, I definetly wouldn't want to live near one.
Imo the change in policy looks like the government is slowly pushing nuclear by slight of hand.
Cheers




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It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.

― Mark Twain
 
bg99
post Posted: Nov 21 2020, 05:16 PM
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In Reply To: Mork's post @ Oct 20 2020, 09:08 AM

Only the certified insane would invest in nuclear.... 2nd most expensive energy after geothermal (unless you live in NZ)
France is a ticking time bomb.... with a reluctance to decommission out of date reactors due to the costs (it is cheaper to keep them running).Good luck if you want one of those in your neighbourhood, give me some solar panels anyday. Batteries are stabilising grids and going to smaller closed circuit grids will be the way of the future..... which your government is trying to convince you not to have so they can reap more taxes.

Start reading Mork, here is a starter for you

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_France




 
Mork
post Posted: Oct 20 2020, 09:08 AM
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For anyone interested Michael Moores latest documentary Planet of the humans can be viewed on youtube.

It presents his view of the reality of solar, wind, and biomass technologies.

While im not much of a Michael Moore fan, this documentary provides validity to the recent federal government decision to relegate wind & solar to last place with coal & natural gas.
imo hydrogen wont turn out to be any different, so the new policy looks like a step closer to the use of nuclear energy to provide our base load power in the future.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk11vI-7czE



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It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.

― Mark Twain
 
henrietta
post Posted: Apr 30 2020, 06:35 PM
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Got my new 9.9 kW system turned on today. 27 panels, 2 inverters, 2 phase power . Hopefully it will pay for itself in a few years.

Cheers
J



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"Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits." Satchel Paige

"No road is long with good company." Traditional

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nipper
post Posted: Apr 30 2020, 01:52 PM
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Australia's grid could handle a huge leap in renewable power by 2025

QUOTE
Australia's main electricity grid will be able to accommodate up to 75 per cent renewable energy as soon as 2025, a higher share delivered sooner than the most optimistic previous assessments. Such a leap in renewable power on the grid could be managed by changes in market rules and regulations, the Australian Energy Market Operator, which manages the nation's energy system, has said in a new study.

“Australia has the technical capability to operate a power system where three-quarters of our energy at times comes from renewable energy resources," Audrey Zibelman, AEMO's chief executive, said. The tumbling cost and speed of building new solar and wind farms has already helped expand clean energy's share to about a quarter of the National Electricity Market. As recently as February, the Energy Security Board was predicting clean energy's share of supply would be 40 per cent by 2030.

On Easter Saturday, renewables' share of the NEM - which provides power to about 80 per cent of the population - topped 50 per cent. There have been concerns that Australia's grid, which was designed to connect to a handful of large scale generators, would not cope with the array of solar panels and wind turbines.

But in the new report, AEMO says it believes careful regulation of power generation can overcome these concerns. Achieving the three-quarter share will need changes in markets and regulation otherwise AEMO will have to impose curbs on renewable energy to ensure grid stability, Ms Zibelman said. If such adjustments don't happen, "AEMO will be required to curtail the contribution of these wind and solar resources to 50 or 60 per cent of their potential even though they are the lowest cost way of providing electricity", she said.

Energy and Emissions Reduction Minister Angus Taylor said Australia was installing renewable energy at 10 times the global rate on a per capita basis but AEMO's report highlighted challenges of maintaining that pace. Mr Taylor said renewables had to be complemented by instantly dispatchable energy "such as a gas-fired power station [that] will be crucial to maintaining the security of any large power system".

AEMO earlier this week revealed more about its view of the future grid in a note to stakeholders about the role technologies such as pumped hydro and batteries will play. The cost of building new transmission lines has risen about 30 per cent compared with initial estimates in its Integrated System Plan (ISP). For new gas-fired plants, the cost blowout is in the order of 30-60 per cent, AEMO said.

Pumped hydro, which is seen as an important back-up for renewable energy, could turn out to be 50 per cent more expensive than estimates in its draft ISP.

"[I]t was recognised that there are higher risks and barriers to investment in pumped hydro compared to other forms of storage, as evidenced by the higher number of utility-scale battery projects currently being planned across the NEM," AEMO said. Big battery costs may be 30 to 40 per cent cheaper than earlier forecast.

Despite those revisions, an AEMO spokesman said they did "not apply to the Snowy 2.0 project", the $5 billion-plus plan announced by the Turnbull government to expand Snowy Hydro's existing capacity.

"[T]he pumped hydro cost increases referred to in the ‘progress update on 2020 ISP’ only apply to future, and as yet uncommitted, pumped hydro projects in mainland Australia," he said. "The [AEMO] changes suggest a scenario or sensitivity without Snowy 2.0 is even more worthwhile to investigate than it already was," said Dylan McConnell, an energy expert at Melbourne University. "The 2018 ISP essentially showed Snowy 2.0 crowded out other storage options," he said. "Assuming this is the case - and the cost updates are accurate - then Snowy 2.0 is more unlikely to be the least-cost solution."

Mr Taylor, though, defended his government's support for the giant project: "Snowy 2.0 is the cheapest option to deliver both the necessary firm capacity and large scale storage within a single project."


http://www.smh.com.au/national/australia-s...54obe.html?btis



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Jan 28 2020, 02:05 PM
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Ask for a market, and what do you get?
.
.
...A market that works both ways.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-28/sola...stment/11903706



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Dec 13 2019, 08:33 PM
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QUOTE
"This is a trend we've seen for some time. The cost reduction of [rooftop] solar has surpassed forecasts, but no one predicted it would be this deep, this fast”.

Audrey Zibelman, CEO, Australian Energy Market Operator [manager of the National & Wholesale Electricity Markets]



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 7 2019, 02:56 PM
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Australian mining tycoon Andrew Forrest invests in giant solar farm
Cecilia Jamasmie | December 6, 2019 |

QUOTE
Australian mining billionaire and philanthropist Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest is said to have come to the rescue of a massive and troubled solar farm in Western Australia’s Wheatbelt, by agreeing to invest in the A$130 million ($88m) project.

Sydney-based Sun Brilliance has been working on a 100-megawatt solar farm at Cunderdin, about two hours east of Perth, since 2016. The company, however, has struggled to secure financing and faced snags connecting to the grid since it first proposed the project in 2016, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) reports.

Sun Brilliance confirmed through a tweet on Friday that it had held “very positive discussions” with a “high-calibre investor” to back its project, but didn’t mention Forrester or any of its companies.

Just two weeks ago, the founder of iron ore miner Fortescue Metals Group (ASX: FMG) grabbed headlines for backing another solar farm in Australia’s Northern Territory, which is expected to supply electricity to Singapore.

The company behind that project, Sun Cable, said Forrest’s Squadron Energy and Grok Ventures had become co-lead investors in the A$20 billion-plus development. If successful, the so called Australia-Singapore Power Link development would include a 10-gigawatt-capacity array of panels spread across 15,000 hectares near Tennant Creek, backed by about 22 gigawatt-hours in battery storage.

The Northern Territory plan is being developed alongside a similarly ambitious proposal for the Pilbara, the Asian Renewable Energy Hub. The proposed 15-gigawatt wind and solar hybrid plant is expected to power local industry and develop a green hydrogen manufacturing hub.

Forrester is also investing in 60 megawatt (MW) solar farm being built by Alinta Energy at Christmas Creek, which would help replace diesel generation at mines owned by Fortescue Metals.

https://www.mining.com/australias-mining-ty...ant-solar-farm/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 1 2019, 03:58 PM
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Smart Solar; still pretty dumb?

https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-01/r...y-grid/11731452



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


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