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NEWS PAPER OR MEDIA ARTICLES, ANYTHING INTERESTING
mullokintyre
post Posted: Yesterday, 11:15 AM
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A little while back, Scotty from Marketing was scathing about the 3 cartier watches that the (now former) CEO of Australia Post bestowed upon three of her employees that worked a deal that raked in a couple of billion for AUS Post from the banks.
He said it didn't past the pub test. Fair enough probably, but if you are going to use the pub test, ya hafta use it consistently.

It has been revealed that former finance minister Mathias Cormann has been swanning around using a government supplied jet while he pitches for a tax free jobas the OECD.
fromNEWS au

QUOTE
Mathias Cormann “would have contracted COVID-19” if he wasn’t given taxpayer-funded flights to secure a tax-free job, the Prime Minister claims.

The former finance minister quit politics earlier this month, announcing he would bid to become secretary-general of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Although his income is no longer on the public purse, Mr Cormann has used taxpayer money to fly to several countries across Europe and the Middle East during his campaign.

An RAAF jet, which reports say costs $4000 for every hour it is used, remains on standby for the former finance minister. He has already racked up 20,000 kilometres in the RAAF Dassault 7X.
“This is a very important position, and the OECD is going to play a really important role in the global economic recovery,” he said.

“Mathias would be an upstanding secretary-general of the OECD, standing up for those liberal democratic market-based values which it represents.”

Mr Morrison cited the Rudd government’s campaign for a Security Council seat as proof the investment was worthwhile. Taxpayers spent $25m to secure the seat.

Labor has given bipartisan support for Mr Cormann’s bid for the secretary-generalship, but the Greens are pushing the OECD to reject it over his record on climate change.


What a load of bullshit.

The OECD has proved as ineffective as all the other world Alphabet groupings in solving any problems. They are setup as a gravy train for the self appointed guardians of the world to get even more wealthy.
There is absolutely no guarantee that Australian taxpayers will get anything out of this junket, even if Cormann were to get the gig.
If he wants the job, and he doesn't want to get COVID, hire his own exec jet, it would be Tax deductible!
At the very minimum, he should have to forgo his lavish OZ pension if he gets this new tax free snout in the trough job.

At least in Christine Holgate's case, the rewards were given AFTER the deal was done and the gains for the Aus Post in the bag.

Politicians, hypocrites from the top of their heads to the tip of their toes.

Mick



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Nov 28 2020, 05:41 PM
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If any more proof was needed that Public Service bureacrats live on a completely different plant, surely this pice of news should be the icing on the cake.
From ABC NEWS

QUOTE
Fruit growers and processors say they are crushed by a decision to cut the health star rating (HSR) for 100-per-cent no-added-sugar juices from five stars to as low as two stars.

The trans-Tasman forum has lowered the health star rating of fresh, pure juice
Federal Agriculture Minister David Littleproud was unable to persuade the forum against the move
Devastated farmers fear people will drink less fresh juice, causing more fruit waste
The decision came down to a vote at the Australian and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation, a group made up of state and territory ministers as part of its ongoing response to the five-year HSR review.

Food is rated from half-a-star to five stars depending on how its healthy and risk nutrients compare but the system has come in for criticism.

The Federal Government's aim in developing the ratings is to give shoppers an easy way to identify better choices of packaged and processed foods, something Agriculture Minister David Littleproud asserts is undermined by this decision.

"What I don't accept is the insanity of this decision, which really has no basis on nutritional value — it really just is mind-numbingly dumb," he said.

The forum's July communique revealed Mr Littleproud's initial push — to see 100-per-cent fresh fruit and vegetable juice with no added sugar receive an automatic HSR score of five stars — not supported and the review recommendations were maintained.

The Minister's last chance to improve the rating was Friday's meeting, when he put forward a proposal aiming for an automatic four HSR, a rating he said was supported by the Commonwealth and the farm industry.

"This was it, this was my second crack at it. I had a go in July and got rolled and then rolled again," Mr Littleproud said.

"It would appear that our bureaucrats are working off some other scientific sheet that what reality is."


The world has truly gone nuts.
Mick



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rozz
post Posted: Nov 26 2020, 08:36 AM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Nov 26 2020, 08:22 AM

Yes saw him play many times.
Lived in Naples during the 1990 world cup and watched him at club level and for Argentina.
Best player of his generation by a county mile and for me if he was playing today under todays
rules he would have been untouchable.
Gone at 60...


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early birds
post Posted: Nov 26 2020, 08:22 AM
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https://www.afr.com/world/south-america/die...20201126-p56i1j

World soccer great Diego Armando Maradona, who died on Wednesday less than a month after his 60th birthday, was worshipped like a god for his genius with the ball, but his demons almost destroyed him

A magician with the ball - deceptively quick and a visionary passer - Maradona is considered by some as the greatest soccer player ever,

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geez!! "hand of god" already 60!!
still remember , when i'm a young mug, i'm huge fan of him. time is flying!! sigh!! sadsmiley02.gif



 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 24 2020, 09:38 AM
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In Reply To: Mork's post @ Nov 24 2020, 09:24 AM

this digital world of interconnectedness and cyber footprints dos not auger well for the average citizen.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
Mork
post Posted: Nov 24 2020, 09:24 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Nov 24 2020, 07:55 AM

No reason to trust Zuck, but it probably gets even worse.
The CIA invests in various social media platforms.
the attached is an old article, but it would probably be hard to find a mainstream source these days.
In the old days the FBI routinely illegally opened the mail of its citizens as part of a mass survelliance program. It took years to shut this down.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/social-media-i...-cia-seriously/
QUOTE
You don't need to wear a tinfoil hat to believe that the CIA is using Facebook, Twitter, Google (GOOG) and other social media to spy on people. That's because the CIA publishes a helpful list of press releases on all the social media ventures it sponsors, via its technology investment arm In-Q-Tel. The companies that take In-Q-Tel's money aren't shy about publicizing what they're up to, either. Most recently, GeoSemble announced an update to its GeoXray product, which monitors social media chatter based on location:


This capability benefits business users who may be monitoring competition, supply chain activity or business opportunities in a county, neighborhood or border region.
For governments at the city, local and Federal levels it brings the ability to visualize activity in a given area filtered by topic, time and location.
... we can deliver whatever information is available about that place from websites, blogs, tweets and other social media automatically and accurately ...
The world's largest database on individuals
One of the main threats to privacy comes from advertisers, who want to track everything consumers do on the web and scrape their online accounts for personal information. It shouldn't be surprising, therefore, to learn that the CIA and the worlds largest ad agency network, WPP (WPPGY), have been in bed together on a social media data-mining venture since at least January 2009. WPP currently claims to own the world's largest database of unique individual profiles -- including demographic, financial, purchase and geographic histories. WPP's Visible Technologies unit took an investment from In-Q-Tel in fall of 2009. Visible Technologies develops tools that can scan social media networks such as Twitter and Facebook. WPP also funded Omniture, a marketing ROI agency, with $25 million in January 2009. Omniture's Visual Sciences unit has also taken In-Q-Tel money. The CIA re-upped with Visible Technologies as part of another $6 million funding round in March 2011.

Other companies that mine web data and have taken In-Q-Tel investments include:


  • Fetch Technologues: "Fetch's customized software agents navigate websites to instantly deliver meaningful, useful and reliable data, and easily integrate with a company's existing data management system for immediate analysis."
  • Cleversafe: A cloud-based storage company that, as Wired notes, is "'ideal for storing mission critical data by addressing the core principles of data confidentiality, integrity and availability.' (Incidentally, those principles also spell out CIA)."
  • Cloudera: provides data storage software that makes it easy for governments to process and analyze vast amounts of information.
Google and CIA: old friends
Are you seeing a trend yet? Google (GOOG) has been a partner with the CIA since 2004 when the company bought Keyhole, a mapping technology business that eventually became Google Earth. In 2010, Google and In-Q-Tel made a joint investment on a company called Recorded Future, which has the Minority Report-style goal of creating a "temporal analytics engine" that scours the web and creates curves that predict where events may head. Google is already helping the government write, and rewrite, history. Here, from its transparency report, are some stats on the amount of information it has either given to the government or wiped from the web based on requests by U.S. agencies:


  • 4,601 requests from U.S. government agencies for "user data"
  • Google complied with government requests for user data 94% of the time.
  • 1,421 requests for "content removal"
  • Google complied with content removal requests 87% of the time.
  • 15 requests were from "executive, police etc."
  • 1 was a national security request.
Be seeing you!





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“It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.”

― Mark Twain

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early birds
post Posted: Nov 24 2020, 09:02 AM
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https://www.cnbc.com/2020/11/23/biden-choos...-secretary.html

President-elect Joe Biden has chosen former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen as Treasury secretary, a historic decision that could make her the first woman to lead the department, according to people familiar with the matter.

Yellen, 74, is widely seen as a politically “safe” pick for the role, likely to garner support from Senate Republicans as someone capable of pursing bipartisan compromise during an otherwise fragile time for the economy.

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holly molly... IF Biden on the job [ looks most likely] then there will be loose money policy for next 4 years!! imho.
we have adjust investment strategy on that do we??!!



 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Nov 24 2020, 07:55 AM
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I am not a facebook user, partly due to its toxicity and partly due to the fact that I would never trust that little creep, Zuckerberg.
It seems that FB has now taken on a role similar to the fED, where it becomes a law unto its own. above any mere national governments, and becomes the arbiter of "social acceptance".
From Wired AM
QUOTE
FACEBOOK HAS BROUGHT its might down upon a small but scrappy academic team who've done brilliant work in exposing the company's failures to contain scams, rip-offs, and political disinformation. If the team doesn’t fully dismantle its public-interest research project and delete its data by November 30, Facebook says, it “may be subject to additional enforcement action.” Why? Because the $775 billion company wants to protect our privacy.

For political dirty tricksters, Facebook's self-serve ad platform is a juicy target: If you want to spread disinformation, the platform will help you narrow down the people who'll see it. A canny political actor can use Facebook ads to show lies and vile incitements to people who might act on them, and, just as important, not show those ads to the rest of the world, which would reveal the way politicos talk when they think there's nobody here but us chickens.

Facebook's been fined over this, its execs raked over the coals in Congress and the British Parliament, and it says it has learned its lesson, putting in place measures that will prevent it.

Enter Ad Observer and the Ad Observatory, a project of NYU's Tandon School of Engineering. Ad Observer is a browser plug-in that Facebook users voluntarily install. The plug-in scrapes (makes a copy of) every ad that a user sees and sends it to Ad Observatory, a public database of Facebook ads that scholars and accountability journalists mine to analyze what's really happening on the platform. Time and again, they've discovered gross failures in Facebook's ability to enforce its own policies and live up to its promises.

Facebook has threatened legal action against the Ad Observatory team, claiming that the Ad Observer plug-in violates its terms of service. They want it removed by the Monday after Thanksgiving, or else. In other words, Facebook wants independent, third-party scrutiny of its ad policy enforcement to end at the very moment that its enforcement failures are allowing false claims about the outcome of the 2020 election to spread, challenging the legitimacy of American democracy itself. This deadline also roughly coincides with Facebook’s reinstatement of political advertising. In other words, the company is opening the door to far more paid political disinformation at the very same moment that it is shutting out independent watchdogs who monitor this stuff.

The company swears this action is not driven by a desire to silence its critics. Rather, it says it is acting on its well-known commitment to preserving its users' privacy.

No, really.

Both of these arguments are (to use a technical term) rank bullshit. Facebook's claims that it can enforce its terms of service as though they were laws that had been passed by Congress are based on an anti-competitive suit it brought against a (now defunct) startup called Power Ventures more than a decade ago. In that suit, the company argued that allowing Facebook users to read their messages without logging into Facebook was a crime.

The Power Ventures decision was bonkers, but that's because the law it invoked is even worse. The 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act was rushed into law after Ronald Reagan saw Matthew Broderick in the movie WarGames and panicked (no, really). It's so broadly worded that if you squint right and read every third word, the Power Ventures decision makes a kind of topsy-turvy sense.

But Facebook's legal theories have a serious problem. Over the past decade, the courts have substantially narrowed the precedent from Power Ventures, thanks to a pair of suits: Sandvig v. Barr and HiQ v. LinkedIn. These modern precedents make Facebook's legal arguments a hard stretch.

Even more of a stretch: Facebook's claims that it is only acting to protect its users' privacy. Set aside for a moment the absurdity of the 21st century's worst privacy invaders positioning themselves as privacy champions. Stipulate that Facebook has found privacy religion and is really here to defend its users' privacy.

Facebook does not protect its users' privacy by vetoing their explicit choice to share whatever ads they see with Ad Observatory. Privacy, after all, is not the situation in which no one knows anything about you. (That's secrecy.) Privacy is when you decide who gets to know stuff about you, and what stuff they get to know. As Facebook elegantly puts it in its own policy documents: "What you share and who you share it with should be your decision."


Most of the so called "ads" on the majority of sites are nothing but clickbait, and in some cases, complete scams.
The last thing the big boys (aka FANGS) want is someone not approved by them to be looking at their "ethics".

Mick




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mullokintyre
post Posted: Nov 23 2020, 08:09 PM
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A week or so ago, I commented on some questionable comments and activity from Brett Sutton, Victoria Chief Health Officer.
But today he has taken out the gold medal for blame shifting.
From Todays OZ
QUOTE
When reflecting on the state’s handling of the second wave, Prof Sutton said the greatest frustration was the lack of national support mechanisms to trace cases when clusters emerged.

He said the health department was struggling to keep up with administrative responsibilities.

“Additional support has been straightened out, and it’s run much more smoothly,” Prof Sutton told the inquiry.

He said South Australia was able to call upon multiple jurisdictions for help handling its outbreak last week but enough hadn’t been done to help Victoria during its second wave.


Is this the same org that accepted and then rescinded the offer of help from the ADF?

Is it the same org that decided to not follow what the other states were doing after the national gabfest of all the premiers, the so called national cabineT?
The same org that according to D Andrews had "a world class tracing system" that used pencil and paper when other states were using tablets.
What resources was he lkooking for, more pencils, paper and erasers??
The same org that did not have a QR code ready system, despite being shown how effective it was in other states?


The bloke has no concept of responsibility. Its always someone elses' fault.

Mick




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nipper
post Posted: Nov 22 2020, 09:59 AM
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I know Mick was banging on about WEF , and they really are an unconscionable bunch of self appointed pricks.

Founder Klaus Schwab says states the patrician aims quite openly.
QUOTE
COVID19 lockdowns may be gradually easing, but anxiety about the world’s social and economic prospects is only intensifying. There is good reason to worry: a sharp economic downturn has already begun, and we could be facing the worst depression since the 1930s. But, while this outcome is likely, it is not unavoidable.

To achieve a better outcome, the world must act jointly and swiftly to revamp all aspects of our societies and economies, from education to social contracts and working conditions. Every country, from the United States to China, must participate, and every industry, from oil and gas to tech, must be transformed. In short, we need a “Great Reset” of capitalism.

WEF calls this effort its Great Reset Initiative.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


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