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Australia, ..you too, Tassie
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 25 2018, 11:54 AM
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https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/23/science/...rcontinent.html
An animation showing the separation of Antarctica and Australia, the two large blue masses, from the Gondwana supercontinent over tens of millions of years.CreditCreditBy P. Haas/kiel University



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 6 2018, 02:34 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Nov 6 2018, 11:20 AM

all the goss:

The model
The model for this painting was named Marie, not Chloé. She was born to a poor family in 1856, and was of Persian descent. She left home at a young age and started posing for artists in order to gain some income for herself and her sister. She was 19 when Lefebvre painted her for Chloé. Considerable controversy surrounds her relationship with Lefebvre, which much disagreement as to the exact nature of the relationship. Some have said that she had a sexual relationship with him, while others have said that he rejected her.[6] Another account says that he seduced both Marie and her sister. Whatever the truth was, a year after Lefebvre completed the Chloé painting, he married her sister. A year after that, Marie hosted a party with close friends, during which she slipped away into the kitchen and made and drank a poisonous substance. The exact reason for her suicide remains unknown but some have speculated that she did it because of her unrequited love for Lefebvre.[7]





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloe_(artwork)






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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price

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mullokintyre
post Posted: Nov 6 2018, 11:39 AM
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In Reply To: triage's post @ Nov 6 2018, 10:50 AM

In my previous life working in mines, trains did have a dead mans switch.
It was common practice to put a brick on the pressure switch and have a snooze.
Mick



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nipper
post Posted: Nov 6 2018, 11:20 AM
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Apropos the thread title, Barry Humphries used to refer to Chloé being painted "before the discovery of Tasmania". Look it up and you'll understand.

QUOTE
Chloé is a 260 by 139 cm oil canvas painting of a young Parisian girl by French figure painter Jules Joseph Lefebvre, made in 1875. The painting is located in the upstairs bar of the Young and Jackson Hotel in Melbourne, Australia, where it has been since 1909.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Nov 6 2018, 11:15 AM
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A dead man's switch is a switch that is designed to be activated if the human operator becomes incapacitated, such as through death, loss of consciousness, or being bodily removed from control. Originally applied to switches on a vehicle or machine, it has since come to be used to describe other intangible uses like in computer software.

These switches are usually used as a form of fail-safe where they stop a machine with no operator from potentially dangerous action or incapacitate a device as a result of accident, malfunction, or misuse. They are common in such applications in locomotives,......

Wikipedia



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
triage
post Posted: Nov 6 2018, 10:50 AM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Nov 6 2018, 10:33 AM

I saw a story (on SBS I think) about the train trip from Adelaide to Darwin and basically how the drivers had bugger all to do for much of the time. In fact their main job was to keep pressure on one of the pedals - as soon as there was no pressure on the pedal the train automatically stopped. The idea is if the driver became incapacitated in any way there would not be a runaway train. I find it astounding that these BHP trains, presumably each with only one driver, would not have a similar feature. Madness. Unacceptable.



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

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joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 6 2018, 10:33 AM
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Attached File  railway.png ( 530.52K ) Number of downloads: 0


link : https://twitter.com/i/moments/1059553550840123393
today is raceday in Melbourne, a wash-out

but..not this:
Runaway train deliberately derailed
in WA after traveling 95km unmanned Australian news 2 hours ago BHP has suspended all Australian freight trains after a locomotive with 268 wagons travelled 92km across the Pilbara unmanned and at great speed. It's understood the driver alighted to check on a wagon and the train began to roll away.
John McRae @McrazyR · 15h15 hours ago Replying to @JohnNicholls6PR Well at least the track must have been in excellent condition because it would have self- derailed otherwise. That IS a true runaway train 40,000 tonnes x 220 km/hr is a lot of energy. The pile-up at the derail would be horrendous. Waiting for photos.



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price

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joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 2 2018, 02:38 PM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Nov 2 2018, 01:36 PM

only a matter of time, H cool.gif
one strike, a years supply .....they'll blow up a lot of batteries getting it right




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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
henrietta
post Posted: Nov 2 2018, 01:36 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Nov 2 2018, 01:10 PM

I'm sure they'll be storing all that energy in a battery somewhere.

Cheers
J

 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 2 2018, 01:10 PM
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#SA
Over 200,000 lightning strikes hit South Australia
pictures:
https://twitter.com/i/moments/1058169595721211904





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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
 


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