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China the monster.
early birds
post Posted: Oct 5 2018, 11:14 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Oct 5 2018, 09:21 AM

tongue.gif , it's "old news" over two weeks or more Mick.

watch this video Mick kinda feel that you might pat more attention to it. lmaosmiley.gif

the video is english

http://www.wenxuecity.com/news/2018/10/04/7699342.html



 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Oct 5 2018, 09:21 AM
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China is getting a lot of adverse publicity recently.
Firstly, there was the row with a Chinese family who demanded to stay in the foyer of the hotel they had booked for the following day.
QUOTE
Sweden and China have become embroiled in an unlikely diplomatic row after three Chinese tourists were thrown out of a hostel in Stockholm in an argument over check-in times.

Videos showing what China has described as the “brutal mistreatment” of a man and his elderly parents by Swedish police have been viewed more than 100 million people on social media, sparking a heated debate in the Chinese blogosphere.

The incident began innocently enough on 2 September, when a family identified as the Zengs arrived at the Generator Hostel in Stockholm one night before they had booked to stay.

The Zengs reportedly asked to wait out the night on the sofas in the hostel’s lobby, but were told they couldn’t and were asked to leave. When they objected, hostel staff called the police – at which point videos of the incident show Zeng being carried out by two officers, screaming in English: “This is killing, this is killing.”

Reactions on social media have been divided between those who question the Swedish police’s handling of the situation, and those who criticise the behaviour of the Zeng family. At one point in the videos, filmed by passers-by, all three are lying prone on the pavement calling out for “help” as the police officers stand around looking bemused.

The Chinese government, however, is taking the matter very seriously indeed. Two statements have been issued by the Chinese Embassy in Sweden, the first a safety alert warning would-be visitors to Sweden of incidents involving theft, robbery and poor treatment at the hands of the Swedish police.

The second statement ups the ante, explaining that China is “deeply appalled and angered by what happened and strongly condemns the behaviour of the Swedish police”. It claims: “What the police had done severely endangered the life and violated the basic human rights of the Chinese citizens.”


Early Checkin

Then we had the case of a Chinese reporter slapping the face of a UK Conservative party Aparatchik andshouting down the congress.

QUOTE
Another week, another nationalistic outburst by a Chinese citizen abroad goes viral.


Hu Xijin 胡锡进
@HuXijin_GT
Why can't Chinese reporters have the right to ask questions and express opinion at this conference? Why views from mainland were rejected? For future conference of such, please invite me to participate.😊

Benedict Rogers
@benedictrogers
CCTV Reporter Taken Away by Police after Screaming and Slapping at UK Conference on Hong Kong Autonomy - https://www.whatsonweibo.com/chinese-cctv-r...-kong-autonomy/ …

This time a state television reporter named Kong Linlin allegedly disrupting a discussion about human rights in Hong Kong, which was being held at the Conservative Party's annual conference in the UK.

Video of the scuffle shows the reporter slapping an organiser and then refusing to leave, declaring she has "the right to protest" in a "democratic UK".

She was removed and briefly arrested but it didn't end there.

As usual when these increasingly common events occur, China demanded apologies.

Two of them — one to Kong Linlin's employer CCTV, and another to the Chinese embassy, which said: "In a country that boasts freedom of speech, it is puzzling that the Chinese journalist should encounter obstruction."

In China, some of the country's 800 million web users questioned Ms Kong's actions, but on the popular and highly censored platform Weibo, there was widespread support, with some congratulating her for confronting, "poisonous Hong Kong separatists".

Hu Xijin, the editor of China's most nationalistic tabloid, the Global Times, used Twitter to ask: "Why can't Chinese reporters have the right to ask questions and express opinion at this conference? Why views from mainland were rejected?"


ABC NEWS




Now we have this startling article from Bloombergs.
QUOTE
In 2015, Amazon.com Inc. began quietly evaluating a startup called Elemental Technologies, a potential acquisition to help with a major expansion of its streaming video service, known today as Amazon Prime Video. Based in Portland, Ore., Elemental made software for compressing massive video files and formatting them for different devices. Its technology had helped stream the Olympic Games online, communicate with the International Space Station, and funnel drone footage to the Central Intelligence Agency. Elemental’s national security contracts weren’t the main reason for the proposed acquisition, but they fit nicely with Amazon’s government businesses, such as the highly secure cloud that Amazon Web Services (AWS) was building for the CIA.

To help with due diligence, AWS, which was overseeing the prospective acquisition, hired a third-party company to scrutinize Elemental’s security, according to one person familiar with the process. The first pass uncovered troubling issues, prompting AWS to take a closer look at Elemental’s main product: the expensive servers that customers installed in their networks to handle the video compression. These servers were assembled for Elemental by Super Micro Computer Inc., a San Jose-based company (commonly known as Supermicro) that’s also one of the world’s biggest suppliers of server motherboards, the fiberglass-mounted clusters of chips and capacitors that act as the neurons of data centers large and small. In late spring of 2015, Elemental’s staff boxed up several servers and sent them to Ontario, Canada, for the third-party security company to test, the person says.

Nested on the servers’ motherboards, the testers found a tiny microchip, not much bigger than a grain of rice, that wasn’t part of the boards’ original design. Amazon reported the discovery to U.S. authorities, sending a shudder through the intelligence community. Elemental’s servers could be found in Department of Defense data centers, the CIA’s drone operations, and the onboard networks of Navy warships. And Elemental was just one of hundreds of Supermicro customers.

During the ensuing top-secret probe, which remains open more than three years later, investigators determined that the chips allowed the attackers to create a stealth doorway into any network that included the altered machines. Multiple people familiar with the matter say investigators found that the chips had been inserted at factories run by manufacturing subcontractors in China.


The full article is quite long, and makes fascinating reading. Like so much stuff on the internet, its very difficult to verify.
But on face value iys quite startling in its breadth.

Mick



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Sep 27 2018, 05:49 PM
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SOY LATE TO COST MORE

QUOTE
China’s hunger for soybeans is a window into an encroaching environmental crisis

09.25.18
BY JEFF NESBIT

How China’s desperate efforts to source soybeans from all over the world is explained by the country’s fear of running out of water.

China approached Peru and Brazil with an extraordinarily ambitious proposition several years ago. It would build a 3,000-mile railroad from the western coast of Peru to the eastern coast of Brazil to handle commerce and trade from the interior of South America to China.

If successful, the massive infrastructure project would expand Peru’s trade options and give Brazil’s soybean farmers a cheaper, more direct route to China than the increasingly expensive shipping through the Panama Canal.

…

The much bigger question is why China was willing to go to such extraordinary lengths. Yes, such a railroad through the heart of the Amazon would shorten times for soybean shipping between Brazil and mainland China, and bypassing the Panama Canal to ship across South America and then from a Peruvian port would likely save the Chinese money. But why the pressing need? Are soybeans a genuinely strategic resource, requiring China to secure their continued supply?

The answer, in a word, is yes. Soybeans have become quite important to China. They are the answer–for now–to a looming crisis building for 20 years that now threatens the fabric of the Chinese economy in the near future.

…

Sixty percent of all soybeans grown worldwide are now exported to China, with 5% to 8% growth per year and no signs of slowing down. Experts predict this insatiable appetite could outstrip the entire global production of soybeans–including in the U.S. and Brazil–within a decade. This partially explains why China is willing to build a railroad through the Amazon. It needs to buy almost every soybean grown in South America.

…

In northern China, where soybeans were once traditionally grown, water tables are dropping at a rate of up to 10 feet a year. Northern China (and parts of the west) is running out of water. The remaining water in rivers and streams is so polluted that the government has a daunting sanitization task. Add the effects of desertification–drifting sands covering cropland at the rate of 1,400 square miles (that’s like adding a new desert larger than Rhode Island) every year–and it’s nearly impossible to grow soybeans in northern China.


There are some remarkable figures in there, one might need to find some verification of them before putting to much credence on them.
It would suggest that fights over fresh water will be the next big thing.

Mick





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nipper
post Posted: Sep 15 2018, 11:59 AM
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QUOTE
Last week, Chinese state media Xinhua published an editorial slamming the portrayal of men in Chinese media, claiming the popularity of the "sickly aesthetics" in effeminate celebrities was having an adverse impact on teenagers.

Xinhua said that "sissy pants" or "little fresh meats" — who they describe as effeminate young men who use makeup, are slender and wear androgynous clothing — were hurting China's national image.

"In an open and diverse society, aesthetics can be varied, and people can enjoy what they do," Xinhua's editorial said. "However, everything should have a limit … in this case, it's no longer a matter of aesthetics, but it is an enthusiasm for ugliness and vulgarity.......
https://amp-abc-net-au.cdn.ampproject.org/v...ence%2F10221984

- send in the PLA



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
early birds
post Posted: Sep 5 2018, 09:51 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Sep 5 2018, 08:59 PM

http://www.wenxuecity.com/news/2018/09/04/7599453.html

hope you guys can understand Chinese or get a google translator or something.... it is all over Chinese media atm... lmaosmiley.gif

so freaking funny!! lmaosmiley.gif



 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 5 2018, 09:12 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Sep 5 2018, 08:59 PM

QUOTE
China could knock a few of these blokes off..
..and it seems that people are detained at the Communist Party's convenience (and their own inconvenience) quite frequently.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


mullokintyre
post Posted: Sep 5 2018, 08:59 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Sep 5 2018, 10:24 AM

While I was searching the internet for stories on the Pacific Island nations criticising China for its CO2 emissions, I found the following:

QUOTE
Richard Liu (Liu Qiangdong 刘强东) is the CEO of JD, the mammoth ecommerce firm that competes with Alibaba. He was arrested on August 31 in Minnesota for alleged sexual misconduct involving a university student.

The news was huge in China, something like if Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos were to be arrested on similar charges.
Liu was released the following day. JD denied any wrongdoing on Liu’s part and said he was falsely accused. However, media reports say the Minnesota authorities are still calling it “an active investigation.”
Liu has returned to Beijing and resumed leadership of the company.
“In July, a judge in Australia rejected his request to prevent the release of his name in connection with a case in which a sexual assault was said to have taken place after a 2015 party at his Sydney penthouse,” reports the New York Times in its report on the Minnesota incident (porous paywall).
For more on the incident, see Richard Liu: 4 things to know about the talk of China on Inkstone, and Richard Liu’s Minnesota mug shots go viral on Weibo on What’s on Weibo.

One piece I recommend reading about Liu: JD CEO’s arrest steps on governance landmine by Robyn Mak on Reuters Breakingviews. Mak notes that China’s growing #MeToo movement could inspire a consumer backlash against JD, but his main argument is one that applies to all Chinese internet companies that have listed on international stock exchanges:

It “is not entirely clear how JD might operate if Liu is detained or incapacitated for a long stretch,” which is important because Liu “controls 80 percent of the vote thanks to a feudal shareholder system that was cemented in the 2014 initial public offering.” Liu is also the chairman as well as CEO, which means there is “no obvious second-in-command or successor.”
The problem is even worse because of VIEs — variable interest entities. Simply put, foreigners are not allowed to own Chinese tech and media companies. So when Baidu, Sina, Alibaba, Tencent, and JD went public, they placed the local operations legally under a PRC company or a PRC citizen’s complete control. The local entity or VIE then signs agreements with the internationally listed entity, which in theory means shareholders are in control.
But because the local entities are controlled by senior executives — in JD’s case, Liu and two other executives are in charge of the VIE — if Liu disappears, there is no procedure for succession. There would be similar problems if something happened to Jack Ma 马云 and Joseph Tsai 蔡崇信 of Alibaba, Pony Ma 马化腾 of Tencent, or Robin Li 李彦宏 of Baidu.


The very last part was the most intriguing., Someone wanting to mess with China could knock a few of these blokes off and it would be an interesting outcome!

Mick



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Sep 5 2018, 10:24 AM
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Pacific Leaders attending the Pacific Islands Forum in Nauru are putting up some interesting concepts in relattons with China.
Firstly, the host country, Nauru, recognises Taiwan as an independent country.
This a serious non no for China, and as a result, Nauruan diplomats who travel to China are not allowed to use diplomatic passports, and there fore must use their personal passports and get visas accordingly.
Hence, when China diplomats wanted to attend the forum as "Observers", Nauru returned the favour and told them they could only travel on their personal passports and thus needed a visa.
The Chinese were affronted mightilly, and according to The Australian it it was Australian Government officials who suggested a compromise where "the Chinese officials were allowed to use official passports, but they were not stamped". Usual sort of childish diplomatic points scoring.
Then, when the Chinese delegates were not allowed to speak when they demanded to, the head man made a big fuss of walking out.

Now thats the way to win friends.

On a side note, the ABC NEWS , makes much of the fact that

QUOTE
Climate change will be front and centre in today's meeting.

Many Pacific Island leaders have been warning that the changing climate poses an existential threat to them.

Some of their nations barely poke their noses above the ocean — Tuvalu lists its highest point as 4.6 metres above sea level. Any rise in ocean levels could prove disastrous.


Perhaps more importantly, these tiny atolls are hugely vulnerable to cyclones which sometime rake the Pacific, and which scientists predict will become more intense as the climate changes.

All the leaders at PIF are set to sign a new security agreement called Biketawa Plus, which labels climate change the "greatest challenge" to the livelihoods and security of Pacific people.

But the timing is awkward for Senator Payne.

She's become Foreign Minister courtesy of a coup provoked — in part — by internal turmoil over energy policy.

And while the Pacific might want to make deeper cuts to carbon emissions, some Coalition MPs are urging the new Prime Minister Scott Morrison to tear up the Paris agreement entirely.


The increase in "Carbon Pollution" aka CO2, from China this year will be more than all of the output from Australia.
If climate change is front and centre, surely they would be targeting the biggest emitters of CO2?
In 2015, the most recent data I could readily find, the top six in order are China, USA, European Union India, Russian Federation and Japan.
Between them, they account for 68% of the CO2 emissions. Australia?? 1.24%

Have the Pacific Islands Forum lambasted China over its pollution? Not that we have heard.
What about USA, or India, or Russia, the European Union? Not a cracker. nada.

What they really want is to use it as lever to extract more aid money from Australia.

Hipocracy is alive and well.

Mick



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triage
post Posted: Aug 24 2018, 07:19 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Aug 19 2018, 12:30 PM

Here's the South China Morning Post's take on the visit by Malaysia's Mahathir to China. Looks like lots of diplomatic wordage being used by both the leaders and by the article's writer (in the age of Trump it all sounds rather quant). For instance I don't reckon the Chinese would actually be that impressed with Mahathir unilaterally killing under construction projects - sets a terrible precedent. And I don't reckon the Malaysians would be overly impressed with the Chinese sending de facto warships into territory claimed by Malaysia. But they both managed to put a positive spin on the interaction. Well done to them.

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/...bel-not-so-fast



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

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triage
post Posted: Aug 22 2018, 08:35 AM
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Here is a recent newsletter by an old China hand. I've not come across Bill Bishop before but with the loss of a couple of my usual goto China observers I will have to make an effort to follow him. He suggests that Xi remains fully in control, that the Chinese have decided that the yanks are out to destablise them and notes that the Chinese managed to uncover and kill 30 CIA "assets" so the Americans are pretty much flying blind at the moment.

https://nb.sinocism.com/p/thoughts-from-my-...nt-beijing-trip




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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog

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