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Computer issues and problems, virus warnings, tech problems, whatever
nipper
post Posted: Apr 7 2014, 02:30 PM
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Surviving Tuesday's Windows XP doomsday - Peter Moon

From Tuesday, Windows XP is officially an orphan, along with its sibling Office 2003. The veteran desktop operating system and, for our money, the best edition of Office, are no longer supported by Microsoft.

Nobody knows for sure how many installations remain in service in Australia. Microsoft guesses it's about 1.5 million but since XP's registration and activation systems aren't as rigid as later versions of Windows, there might be a lot more.The one thing we can say with certainty is that none of them should remain connected to the internet beyond this week.

Nobody doubts hackers have stockpiled exploits against XP, waiting for the day Microsoft wouldn't lift a finger to fight them. It's open season on XP users. Most antivirus houses are maintaining support for the operating system for at least a year, but Symantec won't commit to a fixed support period, recognising the task of securing computers that rely on an increasingly insecure OS could become a nightmare at any time.

The company has committed to support for the foreseeable future, but that isn't a far horizon. As for other vendors, who are accepting 12-month subscriptions and reassuring users that they can maintain XP's security viability for at least that long, we're glad we don't serve on their risk management committees.

There's no point in constructing detailed doomsday scenarios around the tens of millions of unpatched PCs that will still be linked to the internet for a long time to come. All sorts of gruesome outcomes are possible.

The final patch will cover off a recently discovered vulnerability that allows an outsider to run code of their choice on a target XP machine. That kind of security loophole regularly turns up in all versions of Windows and is closed on a case by case basis as Microsoft plays catch up with the bad guys. For XP, the cops are now abandoning the neighbourhood to the robbers, except that antivirus suppliers are willing to operate Neighbourhood Watch until lawlessness overruns them.

Many of the world's banking autotellers run XP too, but that special embedded version will be supported until early 2016, and Australia's banks report they are well advanced with orderly migration plans. Microsoft is making a special support exception for a small number of large customers willing to pay heavily for a little breathing space for their upgrades.

But for the rest of XP's user base, a pop up message that alerts them that their PC has entered the twilight zone will be the last communication they hear from Redmond.

So where next? If you've stuck with XP this long, any move will be radical. Windows 7 is the supported option nearest to what you're used to, but licences for that will become harder to source as Microsoft counts down to the release of Windows 9, rumoured for April 2015. Maybe it's even time to consider the Mac option. If you're going to be forced to radically reinvent yourself, why not consider all the mainstream options?

Office 2003 users should take a look at open source alternative LibreOffice, which we've mentioned favourably before in this column. The interface of LibreOffice Writer, its answer to MS Word, is closer to the no ribbons, no fuss layout of Word 2003 than any recent edition of Word. If you prefer to customise your menus so that all the tools you regularly rely on are in fixed positions on a single screen, Writer fits the bill.

Some users won't have the choice of retiring XP machines, because they rely on legacy software that isn't compatible with later Windows releases. Wherever possible, these veterans should be isolated from the internet and from other PCs on the internal network. If they absolutely must have net access, be sure that a competently configured hardware firewall minimises the risk of unauthorised traffic and alerts you to any evidence of irregular activity. Where possible, we always prefer to run ancient operating systems and applications as virtual machines, to sidestep the risk that they won't play nicely with new hardware, should repairs or replacement ever be required. Finally, switch to web browsers Chrome or Firefox. Both offer up to date XP versions, whereas Internet Explorer for XP stalled at the antique version 9.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: arty  
 
balance
post Posted: Mar 12 2014, 07:22 PM
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In Reply To: hungry's post @ Mar 12 2014, 05:40 PM

Good news. Happy I was able to assist in some way. Computers are wonderful things but frankly $#!T me to tears.



--------------------
Day Trader: Lowest form of life in the known universe.
Shorter: Can limbo under a day trader.
Investor: Salt of the Earth.Sits to the right of God (Warren Buffet)
Share prices are only ever manipulated down.
Paper losses are not really losses.
Chat site posters always know better & know more than anyone about anything.
I'm 29.
The cheque is in the mail.
 
hungry
post Posted: Mar 12 2014, 05:40 PM
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In Reply To: balance's post @ Mar 9 2014, 08:48 AM

Hi Balance

All sorted.

It wasn't the specific prob you mentioned but another that was also mentioned on the link you gave me.

Uninstalled my TPLink and now run net connection via Windows. This also stopped my annoying net dropouts.

Thanks for the info smile.gif

Cheers




 
arty
post Posted: Mar 9 2014, 06:10 PM
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In Reply To: billy12's post @ Mar 9 2014, 03:47 PM

Thanks Billy,

That's exactly what I did, and the .NET (for 2008 Server) was installed OK.
(only difference: I don't need to start Windows Update because mine is set to download and tell me when/what I have to install.)
The problem returned when the stupid update popped up again and I accepted its installation. As it's for the 2003 version, it bombed out again. So now I've put this particular update on hide/ignore and it's AOK.



--------------------
I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)
 
hungry
post Posted: Mar 9 2014, 05:43 PM
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In Reply To: balance's post @ Mar 9 2014, 08:48 AM

Awesome Balance

Thanks for doing my homework for me:) I'm not the smartest IT mug around, and now I don't have my kids around to fix things for me.

Have disabled it and see how it goes. It was an intermittent thing, so will take a day or so to trial the fix.

Will let you know how it goes.

Cheers




 
billy12
post Posted: Mar 9 2014, 03:47 PM
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In Reply To: arty's post @ Mar 9 2014, 12:14 PM

Try this Mate.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2507641/en

Method 1: Repair the .Net Framework 4 installation.

If you run Windows Vista or Windows 7, follow these steps:
  1. Exit all running programs.
  2. Click Start, type Uninstall in the Search box, and then click Uninstall a program.
  3. Double-click Microsoft .NET Framework 4 Client Profile.
  4. Select Repair .NET Framework 4 Client Profile to its original state, and then click Next.
  5. When the repair is complete, click Finish.
  6. Click Restart Now to restart your computer.
  7. To install the latest Windows updates, click Start, click All Programs, and then click Windows Update.


 


arty
post Posted: Mar 9 2014, 12:14 PM
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For the past week, Windoze Update told me to install a critical update to .NET framework on my 64-bit Win 7 machine.
When I allowed it to proceed, the installation process aborted with an unknown error code 66B.
Help from Micro-stuffed said to uninstall .NET and retry. Same result every time.

In the end, I gave up and followed another suggestion: Right-click and Hide the update in question.
I've also found out since then that my installed .NET framework is the 2008 version, whereas the update refers to 2003.
"Durr!" Nice one, Mr Gates mad.gif



--------------------
I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)
 
balance
post Posted: Mar 9 2014, 08:48 AM
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Posts: 5,584
Thanks: 587


In Reply To: hungry's post @ Mar 9 2014, 08:31 AM

Possibility? or here maybe same thing, one shows a pic.



--------------------
Day Trader: Lowest form of life in the known universe.
Shorter: Can limbo under a day trader.
Investor: Salt of the Earth.Sits to the right of God (Warren Buffet)
Share prices are only ever manipulated down.
Paper losses are not really losses.
Chat site posters always know better & know more than anyone about anything.
I'm 29.
The cheque is in the mail.
 
hungry
post Posted: Mar 9 2014, 08:31 AM
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Posts: 2,967
Thanks: 271


Hi

Does anyone have an idea about why my cursor disappears with a "ding" when typing mid sentence.

I have to click back where I was to get the cursor back to continue typing.

Bought another keyboard and mouse but no diff.

Using Windows 7




 
alonso
post Posted: Feb 23 2014, 10:17 AM
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In Reply To: grevillia's post @ Feb 21 2014, 09:22 AM

In case anybody is interested, I think I've isolated that problem I was having. I'm pretty sure it related to my anti-virus/malware program (System Mechanic Pro). I had ticked a box giving an extra layer of protection to email and since unticking I don't seem to have had the problem anymore.
I'll have to contact them and let them know about the problem.



--------------------
"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith

Said 'Thanks' for this post: grevillia  
 
 


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