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Water
birnam
post Posted: Feb 14 2020, 09:40 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Feb 13 2020, 09:07 PM

We will see how much water gets through. NSW lifted its moratorium on pumping from northern-Darling catchments for 3 days. Qld never had a moratorium so water harvesting with pumps is presumably happening. Capture of overland flows are another issue. Some have some regulation, others are open slather.

 
nipper
post Posted: Feb 13 2020, 09:07 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Feb 4 2020, 10:27 AM

Several major rivers feeding the Murray-Darling Basin have started to flow, including the Condamine and Balonne in Queensland and the Namoi and Barwon in NSW. Much of that water ultimately enters the Darling, which has not flowed solidly for years.

The Murray-Darling Basin Authority says, among other revivals, the Moonie River in Queensland is flowing for the first time since April 2018. Parts of the Weir, Macintyre and Dumaresq rivers of the Queensland-NSW Border Rivers region also are flowing, while in NSW water is passing through large sections of the Gwydir, Castlereagh and Macquarie catchments.
https://www.mdba.gov.au/media/mr/recent-rai...mmunities-alike

enough for a flood? Probably not.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Feb 4 2020, 10:27 AM
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There is another cyclone brewing off the Pilbara, ,should be declared by Friday.

from BOM



If the forecasts are correct, the Murray darling Basin will get a pretty big influx of water over the net 8 days.
The MB Basin will get at least an inch, about half will get 2 inches, and a third up to four inches.
An area of of about 500 square miles around Cunnamulla is forecast to get 4 inches plus.
Big rain if it comes true.
Be nice to see a bit of flood water scooting down the Darling.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
nipper
post Posted: Feb 4 2020, 08:24 AM
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Just putting this here for a bit of context/ continuity
QUOTE
Keppel Infrastructure Trust-owned Ixom is about to purchase US water treatment business Medora Environmental for about $US24 million. Medora provides water management solutions to businesses in sectors like mining, agriculture, energy and manufacturing.

Ixom meanwhile is the market leader in water treatment in Australia and New Zealand, as well as a chemicals distributor. The Medora acquisition will grow Ixom's US presence and will combine with the company's existing water treatment offering.

Ixom and Medora are competing for a slice of the global water market, which is expected to hit $US1 trillion by 2025.

It is understood Medora's products will also be used to service the Australian market, where water quality issues are particularly important in drought-stricken areas.

Singapore-listed Keppel have owned Ixom since 2018 when it bought it off Blackstone for $1.1 billion after an auction run by JPMorgan. In the December 2019 quarter, Ixom contributed $264.3 million to Keppel's total revenue of $422.8 million.

Ixom has more than 1000 employees around the world and became a standalone business in 2015 after it was spun out from Orica Australia




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 28 2020, 10:22 AM
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Towns along the Barwon-Darling River system seek relief from brackish drinking water.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/regional-towns-t...53v28.html?btis
QUOTE
Towns along the dwindling Barwon-Darling River system, in the state's parched north-west, hope that mobile desalination plants will provide relief from brackish drinking water as the drought tightens its grip.

Some locals in the small outback towns of Brewarrina, Bourke and Walgett have resorted to using bottled water as their main source of drinking water, despite assurances from health authorities that the tap water, though extremely salty, is safe to drink.

Brewarrina, which sources its water supply from a weir on the Barwon River, will on Tuesday become the first of the three towns to switch on a desalination plant, which the council has borrowed from Tenterfield Council, more than 600 kilometres away.

Mayor Phillip O'Connor said the town's raw water supply was purified at the local treatment plant, but this process could not remove the high sodium content that resulted from the lack of inflow into the river system.

"The longer the river doesn't run, the saltier the water gets. The water is drinkable but it has got a bad taste to it," Cr O'Connor said.

The mobile plant, which was originally donated to Tenterfield council by charity Rural Aid, will filter the water from the treatment plant through a process of reverse osmosis. It has the capacity to provide up to 70,000 litres of drinking water a day.

However, the plant will not connect directly to Brewarrina's water supply, and will instead function as a refilling station, located in the town's Visitor Centre car park, where residents can bring containers and bottles to fill up and take back to their homes.

The Berejiklian government is spending $10 million to install similar desalination plants in Bourke and Walgett, but these will be attached to the towns' water supplies, meaning residents will be able to access the water directly from their taps.

Both towns are forced to rely on emergency bore water when their river supplies run low or cease, but testing has revealed higher sodium levels than those specified in the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines on aesthetic (taste) grounds.

Walgett, on the junction of the Namoi and Barwon rivers, has been surviving on emergency bore water for much of the plast three years. Bourke's supply, which is drawn from a weir on the Darling River, was boosted by 100 millimetres of rain in November, but without further replenishment it will be forced to switch to bore water in the coming months.

Bourke Shire Council general manager Ross Earl said the plant would have the capacity to generate as much as one megalitre of water a day, sufficient for the demands of Bourke's 1900 residents.

"That will be enough water to look after Bourke's needs," Mr Earl said. "All houses will be connected to the desalination supply."

NSW Water Minister Melinda Pavey said the government was also considering reverse osmosis plants for coastal communities, including Forster on the state's Mid North Coast




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jan 27 2020, 02:11 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 27 2020, 01:59 PM

Farmers would be smarter selling all their water entitlements to Investors.
Much easier than trying to make a living out of farming.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 

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nipper
post Posted: Jan 27 2020, 01:59 PM
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QUOTE
Olam Group, listed on the Singapore Stock Exchange and 53 per cent-owned by the Singapore government’s investment arm Temasek, grows and buys crops from 4.7 million farmers in 30 countries and is a world leader in the trade of nuts, spices, cotton, coffee, chocolate, sunflowers, soybeans, rice and dairy products.

It has a 24 per cent share of the cotton market in Australia, owns nine processing gins in northern NSW and Queensland through its subsidiary Queensland Cotton, runs 15,000ha of almond orchards at Robinvale, Victoria, and Darlington Point, NSW, and owns an almond processing plant near Mildura.

In early December, in Australia’s record biggest water trading deal, Olam sold 89 megalitres of its permanent annual irrigation water rights to Canadian superannuation fund PSP Investments for $490m in return for the right to use the water on its Robinvale almond plantations for the next 25 to 50 years. It booked a capital profit of $311m on the massive water deal.

Mr Verghese used his visit to Australia to defend the water trading system, which has faced attack from irrigators during the s drought as temporary water prices have soared above $1000 a megalitre, making it unaffordable for many family farmers.

Farmers have accused investors with no land to farm and no connection to Australian agriculture of speculating on water prices and holding back scarce water to manipulate soaring price rises...

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/a...abb5d5b7ef8a718

14% of Murray Darling water entitlements are held by investors.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 6 2020, 06:06 PM
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one of the issues with recent bushfires is water quality, and whether the authorities (local and state) have the ability to deliver potable water to regional communities. While the Sydney situation is major and problematic, with fires surrounding Warragamba, many local and regional supplies are threatened.

https://www.waterquality.gov.au/issues/bushfires
but the funding will only come from Federal - one would hope this is part of the $2 bill package announced today.
QUOTE
Coordination, policy advice and funding assistance is .... provided by Australian Government agencies during and after bushfires.​

I think De.Mem DEM has the best ability to respond, as most of their business is Industrial Water Treatment Solutions, and often small interventions, while Puriflow PO3 is also well positioned



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 27 2019, 07:13 PM
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QUOTE
"If the wars of this century were fought over oil, the wars of the next century will be fought over water."

World Bank vice president Ismail Serageldin made this much quoted prediction for the new millennium in 1995




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 27 2019, 04:49 PM
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Access to water one of miners’ biggest challenges ahead — study
Cecilia Jamasmie | September 26, 2019
QUOTE
Stricter environmental regulations and changing climate patterns resulting in the worst droughts in more than half a century have multiplied the mining industry’s challenges to secure water supplies, Moody’s Investors Service says in a new report.

Despite successful efforts to manage water usage more efficiently, increasingly tougher environmental rules are hiking miners’ costs and risks, particularly to those operating in arid regions or close to populated communities.

“Many countries, including Peru, Chile, Australia, South Africa and Mongolia have large mining operations exposed to decreasing water availability,” Moody’s senior vice president, Carol Cowan says. “In the next 20 years, all of these countries will be in the high to extremely high ratio of water withdrawals to supply, which will make it difficult for companies to secure reliable sources.”

Squeezing water rights
Chile, the world’s largest copper producer and No.2 global source of lithium, is just one of many jurisdictions where miners will soon have to deal with broader water use restrictions.

The nation’s water authority, DGA, announced earlier this year that it would more than double the number of so-called prohibition areas across the country to at least 70 from 30. No new licenses will be awarded within prohibition zones and any extension to existing mining permits will need to be approved by environmental authorities.

At the same time, companies’ demand for water is expected to jump 12% through 2029 as ore grades decline, forcing miners to process more material to maintain production levels.
Miners have responded by building large desalination plants, which is expected to more than triple seawater use in the country, Chile’s copper commission (Cochilco) predicts.

Miners’ hurdles are exacerbated when using the ground and surface water that local communities rely on. This has resulted in social unrest and prompted stricter norms and permitting processes.

Protests across the globe, including in Peru, Mexico, Armenia, Australia and the US over the last few years, have caused delays in the construction of new mines or in the expansion of existing ones.

Large miners better prepared
In Moody’s opinion, higher capital spending and operational costs associated with securing reliable water supply will be better managed by large, globally diversified firms.

The world’s No. 1 miner BHP already gets more than 40% of the water it needs from the ocean. The miner spent $3.43 billion on a desalination plant for its Chilean Escondida mine, which includes two pipelines to transport the water 3,200 meters above sea level.
The miner has also committed to stop using fresh water drawn from the surface and underground in Chile by 2030.

Southern Copper’s long delayed $1.4-billion Tía Maria project includes plans for a desalination plant that would cost about $100 million. The facility is expected to ease protesters concerns about the proposed mine’s use of local surface and ground water.

Other companies are more focused on using recycled water by capturing what is used in the various parts of the process, such as in tailings dams, by treating and reusing it.

“With water levels expected to continue depleting, smaller mining companies with limited financial flexibility may face increased costs related to water procurement over time,” Cowan says.

Other than their high cost, desalination plants pose an additional worry to miners related to the waste they generate. That product — brine — is usually pumped back into the reservoir where the water was taken from. This causes an imbalance in the overall water composition, which is harmful to the environment within the sourcing body.

https://www.mining.com/access-to-water-one-...es-ahead-study/
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Attached File  water_stress_by_country_map_1024x759.jpg ( 81.48K ) Number of downloads: 0

 




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
 


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