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LCT, LIVING CELL TECHNOLOGIES
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 18 2018, 03:21 PM
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one leads to the other

from Parkinson's UK
"How can we cure Parkinsons" video link

"...but most small molecule drugs don't get into the brain.... types of drugs pharmaceutical companies are now developing, these are the very advanced new types of drugs which are large molecular weight or biological drugs, these are proteins, these are antibodies, these are 'big' drugs, of the top selling drugs in 2014, 8 out of 10 of these biological drugs, bigger drugs and none of these are used to treat neurological diseases and that's because they do not get into the brain...currently, our ability to take advantage of this new wealth of knowledge about drug development is impossible unless we have a method to deliver these into the brain [tick*] and to make this point, again, about 98% of all small molecule drugs do not get into the brain, a 100% of all the big one don't get into the brain.....any attempt to develop a neurotherapeutic by concentrating only on the drug and not giving enough emphasis to delivery [tick*] is highly likely to end in failure..."
"Overcomming the BloodBrain Barrier" video link

[*] NTCell is a neurotrophic factory empathetic to neurogensis, the brain takes what it wants, celluar structures define what they want and take the parts they need, in that, this is an expansionist approach rather than a reductionist approach, within reductionism cells are forced to take on a linear amount or single-identity process




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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 17 2018, 10:26 AM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Nov 17 2018, 09:21 AM

#study #pericyte

in addition to previous post
"Initial study results in the Pericyte Protective Agent project with the University of Auckland
and the Centre for Brain Research show choroid plexus capsules had a beneficial effect on
the survival of human pericytes in vitro. In November2017 LCT filed a provisional patent
for pericyte protective agents to protect the intellectual property from this research collaboration."
http://www.lctglobal.com/upload/news/2018/181115%20LCT%202018%20AGM%20Chairmans%20Address.pdf




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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 17 2018, 09:21 AM
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#study

#pericytes

$LCT partners with Uni of Auckland
Auckland research reveals for first time how Parkinson's develops

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/897...insons-develops
what is
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4759679/



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 15 2018, 01:16 PM
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auction pressure on a small lift today with very good UPDRS results
http://www.lctglobal.com/upload/news/2018/...resentation.pdf





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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 10 2018, 01:12 PM
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#data #research #Parkinsons #Cognition

No Mortality Risk for Parkinson's With Normal Cognition

Sue Hughes

November 06, 2018

Although mortality is increased in patients with Parkinson's disease compared with the general population, this does not appear to be the case for patients who present with normal cognitive function, a new Swedish study suggests.

"As far as we know, this is the first time it has been shown that Parkinson's patients presenting with normal cognition have normal life expectancy," lead author David Backstrom, MD, Umeå University, Sweden, told Medscape Medical News.

"This is a positive message to be able to give to these patients, which made up about 40% of the Parkinson's patients in our study," he said. "Our study shows that Parkinson's disease is not necessarily a death sentence, especially if cognitive function is normal at presentation."

Another major finding is that survival in parkinsonism is highly variable. The investigators have characterized some phenotypes that that are associated with higher mortality rates, Backstrom noted.

"These include patients with atypical parkinsonism, such as progressive supranuclear palsy or multiple system atrophy, and Parkinson's patients with cognitive impairment, rigidity, freezing of gait, and loss of a sense of smell," he said. "Female patients also had a higher mortality risk than male patients. But we didn't find any association between tremor and mortality."

The researchers also conducted imaging studies, which showed that mortality was higher for patients with more severe deficits in the caudate and putamen nucleus. "That makes sense, as it suggests mortality is related to neurodegeneration," Backstrom said.

Another interesting finding was that mortality was greatly increased in patients with low-grade leukocytosis in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Such findings indicate an immunologic reaction.

"This supports other research suggesting that Parkinson's disease could have an immunological component, and if confirmed, it could have important implications, raising the possibility of using immunomodulators as a therapeutic strategy," Backstrom commented.

"Our results suggest that it is beneficial to diagnose patients very carefully when they first present. While we can give good news to those with normal cognitive function, we should also follow more carefully those with characteristics linked to higher mortality," he added.

The study was published online* October 31 in Neurology.

The researchers note that previous studies have suggested that life expectancy is reduced in Parkinson's disease, but the specific factors accounting for the reduced survival are not known.

They point out that most previous studies have used hospital or registry-based cohorts in which patients with mild Parkinson's and older patients may have been underrepresented. In addition, there are few studies of the survival in unselected populations of patients with new-onset idiopathic parkinsonism (including atypical parkinsonism), rather than Parkinson's disease alone.

The study involved 178 patients who were newly diagnosed with idiopathic parkinsonism, which, as well as Parkinson's disease, takes in other conditions, known as atypical parkinsonism, with similar symptoms, such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy.

The study included 143 patients with Parkinson's disease and 31 patients with atypical parkinsonism (18 had progressive supranuclear palsy, and 13 had multiple system atrophy). Four patients were unclassified. They were followed for up to 13.5 years.

At the start of the study and at least once a year, the participants were tested for Parkinson's symptoms and cognitive function. During the study, 109 patients died.

Mortality rates in the general Swedish population were used to calculate standardized mortality ratio and expected survival. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate independent predictors of mortality.

Results showed that the standardized mortality ratio for the whole parkinsonism cohort was 1.84 times higher than the comparable age and sex distribution standardized mortality of the Swedish population during the years 2004 to 2017 (P < .001).

"This means these patients had an 84% increase in mortality compared to the general population over the study follow-up period," Backstrom explained. However, there were large variations in mortality among the parkinsonian patients.




In line with the findings from several previous studies, patients with atypical parkinsonism, including progressive supranuclear palsy or multiple system atrophy, had a markedly worse prognosis than patients with Parkinson's disease. Standardized mortality ratios were 3.32 for patients with atypical parkinsonism and 1.58 for patients with Parkinson's disease.

Assuming the mean age of 71.7 years at baseline in idiopathic parkinsonism, the expected survival in Parkinson's disease was 9.6 years, but it was only 6.1 years in atypical parkinsonism, the researchers state.

They say their results confirm the "dire prognosis" of these atypical parkinsonian disorders. "In fact, age was not a significant predictor of survival in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy or multiple system atrophy, which is likely explained by the strong effect on mortality caused by these disorders themselves."




Cognitive Function

Life expectancy was also strongly related to cognitive function. Those with cognitive impairment at the beginning of the study were 2.4 times more likely to die during the study than those who had normal cognitive function.

Assuming the mean age of 71.2 years at baseline, the expected survival in patients with Parkinson's disease was 11.6 years without cognitive impairment and 8.2 years with mild cognitive impairment. Patients with dementia were excluded.

As a measurement of global cognitive function, survival also correlated with the baseline Mini–Mental State Examination score after adjustment for age (1.19 times higher hazard for death for each lower point, P = .006).

Furthermore, a lower level of education was not associated with increased mortality. This may indicate that the higher mortality in patients with poorer cognitive function was related to the pathologic process that led to cognitive dysfunction, rather than being related to socioeconomic factors, the authors say.

A low-grade inflammatory reaction in the CSF was seen in 13.1% of the patients with Parkinson's disease. This finding was strongly related to a reduced survival, with a 6.31 times increase in hazard for death.

The authors note that an increase of proinflammatory cytokines in the CNS and an inflammatory, hyperreactive state in circulating monocytes have previously been shown in Parkinson's disease. Two large, observational studies have also found a lower risk for Parkinson's disease associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the general population.





"Taken together, our findings might suggest a triggered immune system, responding to the presence of abnormal, misfolded proteins in Parkinson's patients with short lifespans, possibly contributing to disease progression.

"The shorter lifespans in patients with a CSF leukocytosis indicate a rationale for further investigating immunomodulation to reduce Parkinson's mortality," they add.




In an accompanying editorial**, Lawrence I. Golbe, MD, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, and Cristian E. Leyton, PhD, the University of Sydney, Australia, describe the new study as an "important contribution" to estimating life expectancy in parkinsonism.

Although they say the results require validation in independent cohorts, the editorialists say they are "good news for people with Parkinson's disease, their families, and clinicians," because the results suggest that for patients who have mild disease and normal cognition at onset, the mortality rate is equivalent to that of the general population.

They also point out that the study stratifies risks not only by using the traditional clinical markers but also by integrating information derived from laboratory analysis, genomic, and neuroimaging data, which "yields a fine-grain estimation of individual risks."




"The finding of an inflammatory reaction in the CSF suggests direct secondary prophylaxis via anti-inflammatory treatment; and the finding of cognitive status as a predictor similarly suggests rehabilitative measures, not just as palliation, but potentially as prophylaxis," they state.

The study was supported by the Swedish Research Council, the Erling Persson Foundation, Umeå University, the Västerbotten County Council, the King Gustaf V. and Queen Victoria Freemason Foundation, the Swedish Parkinson Foundation, the Kempe Foundation, the Swedish Parkinson's Disease Association, the Torsten Söderberg Foundation, the Swedish Brain Foundation, the European Research Council, and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

Neurology. Published online October 31, 2018. Abstract***, Editorial****







* http://n.neurology.org/content/early/2018/...000000000006576

** http://n.neurology.org/content/early/2018/...000000000006560

*** http://n.neurology.org/content/early/2018/...000000000006576

**** http://n.neurology.org/content/early/2018/...000000000006560









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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 2 2018, 09:47 AM
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the research part of my brain sez 'toldyaso!'
"No benefit was observed when 120 NTCELL capsules were implanted,

there being evidence of inflammation which may have compromised efficacy in this group."

the money part of my brain sez 'oh my!' :

Dr Ken Taylor, CEO of LCT says, “When we have the in-depth analysis of the data and have had appropriate discussions with the

New Zealand regulatory authorities, LCT will be able to confirm its ongoing strategy for NTCELL.”

LCT is a new company on a technical basis when it hit the post november 2017 release
making a final low of .02c on july 16th 2018 which is the lowest swing the stock price has ever achieved based on its operations, the gap of 20c is irrelevant based on that pov, an approval to take a full study is highly likely and changes the whole ballgame given data todate

https://www.asx.com.au/asx/share-price-rese...ements?code=LCT
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LIVING CELL TECHNOLOGIES LIMITED

Last Change % Change Bid Offer Open High Low Close Volume Value Trades VWAP

0.066 +0.015 +29.41 % 0.066 0.067 0.054 0.075 0.054 0.051 24,479,913 1,658,919 396 0.068



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 


joules mm1
post Posted: Oct 29 2018, 10:57 AM
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auction suggests we now have a genuine price level to work from .044-048 range

hate having to chase price !



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Oct 26 2018, 10:33 AM
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571MM scrip avail to auction
smidge under 307MM scrip held by largest 20 shareholders


http://www.lctglobal.com/upload/reports/an...0report-web.pdf
now consistant pressure by retail albeit by low volume after last weeks splash n go






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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Oct 20 2018, 09:03 AM
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Attached Image


OTC LVCLY v. spx/sml link
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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Oct 19 2018, 10:13 AM
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gap 0.041-.044's





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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
 


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