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The future of airlines
nipper
post Posted: Jul 18 2020, 12:26 PM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Jul 18 2020, 12:12 PM

I read that Ballina* airport was one of the busiest in Australia in June. Flights from sthn states including direct from Canberra. Short runway so mainly prop jets. Rex, Qantas Link, Jetstar, AeroPelican and even Virgin flying to it; now Qld is open, and Melbourne in lockdown, the demand has dropped away.

*Now called Ballina Byron Gateway Airport



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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alonso
post Posted: Jul 18 2020, 12:12 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 18 2020, 12:04 PM

Would be interesting to see what the numbers were for REX.



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nipper
post Posted: Jul 18 2020, 12:04 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 18 2020, 11:50 AM

And then there is Domestic aviation

Network reviews, which consider how many flights are on offer on each route, typically happen seasonally but are now scheduled for every week. Virgin Chief Commercial Officer John MacCleod says it is uncharted territory for the entire industry at the moment.

You plan the capacity; you implement it; you check to see how it is filling up and how the bookings are coming in, and the yield is. If you need adjustments, you act, MacCleod says. Despite the more regular reviews, MacCleod admits he did not anticipate the situation in Victoria. The demand basically disappeared overnight, he says.

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce predicted there would be no substantial return to international flying until July next year at the earliest, due to strict border control measures to stop the virus. The domestic boss, Andrew David, whose division accounted for more than half of Qantas overall earnings last financial year, will now be responsible for propping up the company even further while the crisis plays out.

As recently as late June, the domestic division had reaffirmed its aim to return to flying at 40 per cent of its pre pandemic capacity by July. He remains sure there is pent-up demand of which he can take advantage but admits that ambitious goal is in tatters.

We are seeing an increase in intrastate travel, and wherever states are removing border restrictions, we are seeing an increase in interstate travel, David says. We had planned to get to 40 per cent of pre-COVID domestic capacity in July, but we won't get there this month. Unfortunately, that means that there will be less of our people stood up to come back to work.


And, if Virgin and Qantas are to ramp up their flying activity as expected, both will be hoping infections do not spike across other parts of the nation.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Jul 18 2020, 11:50 AM
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On 10 July, PM Scott Morrison said Perth would receive only 525 overseas passengers per week and Brisbane 500, with a maximum of 30 people on one plane. Arrivals at Sydney at that stage were capped at 450 per day with no more than 50 passengers on a single aircraft.

Only 30 passengers will be permitted per flight into Sydney International Airport from Monday, causing Singapore Airlines to suspend online sales on flights already at the cap, while a one-way Qatar Airways business class fare from Doha to Sydney now costs $12,000. The new cap means only 350 passengers a day will pass through the airport.

For more than a week, Melbourne has not accepted international travellers as Victoria deals with its second coronavirus outbreak.

The limits at Brisbane and Perth will remain the same.

SIA is now flying only two aircraft into Australia: the A350(900) with 253 seats and the 787(10) with 337 seats. While it is hardly profitable to fly with only 30 passengers on board, a spokesperson said freight and cargo helped make the flights viable.

For now, the new cap will last until 08 August.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Mar 3 2020, 05:44 PM
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QUOTE
International airlines are reporting “no shows” by 50 per cent of passengers as the coronavirus crisis deepens.

The International Air Transport Association has revealed the extent of the impact on member airlines, with one reporting a 108 per cent fall in bookings to Italy, as demand collapses to zero and refunds grow.

Another carrier had experienced a 26 per cent reduction across their entire operation compared to last year, people cancel bookings as far in advance as October.

In response to the crisis, IATA has called for aviation regulators to suspend rules governing airport slots immediately, until the end of the 2020 season.
good luck with that



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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nipper
post Posted: Feb 21 2020, 07:33 AM
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Analysis by ch-aviation showed that as of last week, 1215 aircraft operated by airlines from China, Hong Kong and Macau were grounded, or 29 per cent of the total fleet. This included a third of China Eastern’s fleet, or 196 aircraft; the 173 aeroplanes operated by China Southern; the 119 aircraft belonging to Air China and the 100 jets at Hainan Airlines, which represents 44 per cent of its fleet.

More than 100 aeroplanes were parked at Beijing Capital Airport, 79 at Guangzhou Baiyun International and 60 at Hangzhou International.

With airports generally charging significant fees for aircraft parking, it is expected airlines will seek other arrangements if flights are unable to resume in the short term. Already, the two largest carriers, China Southern and China Eastern, have extended flight cancellations on Australian routes until mid-June and smaller operators are not expected to resume services for even longer....

- soon to be 75 planes parked at Alice Springs airport in the desert air!!



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

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nipper
post Posted: Jul 27 2017, 06:30 PM
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Yield Management... (they call it). As per earlier post on this thread and being well aware of the changes, I recently 'bought' an extra 3 inches of legs room on an upcoming OS flight. Can cost a bit more $100+ per flight (hope that's not per leg!); can buy same on domestic and a bit cheaper, if you are NBL material, though for short distances, its hardly worth it.

With Dreamliner and other models, there are long haul flights that mean that Perth-London non-stop is a reality; and improved fuel efficiency is bringing extended versions of the venerable 737 into trans Atlantic trips. Although the mantra of 2 engines good, 4 engines better holds, for me. And hubs still work unless there is sufficient and sustainable point-to-point demand.

And other changes: Asia, and China especially, is where the growth is. The Middle Eastern outfits, with their subsidies and sand storms and inconvenient truths, may have peaked.

CAPA, (https://centreforaviation.com/insights/anal...database-356495) has come out with a list of Asian airport developments underway or planned:

- Singapore's Changi - terminal 4 planned
- South Korea - Incheon 2nd terminal
- Hong Kong - more reclamation for a 3rd runway
- Beijing - a new $12.9 billion airport due to open in 2019
- Bangkok - 3rd runway for Suvarnabhumi
- Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport — less than 150 kms from Hong Kong — turning into China Southern's primary transfer hub
- Shenzhen - even closer to HK - upgrading airports, for larger international carriers, not just regional
- and who can forget Badgery's Creek

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/201...is-under-threat



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blueice
post Posted: Sep 17 2010, 09:17 AM
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Long time between drinks for this topic - any way here is a good one for the CATTTLE CLASS passengers. Now atleast you can be close enough to whisper sweet things in the ear of the front passenger............pack those doggies in...........LOL

A NEW design for economy class airline seating gives a new meaning to the term "cattle class" - as passengers would sit on saddle-type seats, even closer to the person in front than now.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/n...f-1225925165883


 
balance
post Posted: Nov 25 2008, 03:28 PM
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QUOTE (swuzzlebubble @ Tuesday 25/11/08 01:15pm)

I hope those functionally disabled by being tall get to fly business class at economy prices to gain the extra leg room.
It seems that being obese where some if not most can do something about their condition have an advantage over those born with something out of the ordinary and can do nothing about it.

maybe now we will get to weigh people along with their bags to gauge an airfare. devilsmiley.gif After all, freight is priced largely by weight and it does take a given amount of fuel/energy to transport a given weight.

Interesting decision and will spark debate.



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swuzzlebubble
post Posted: Nov 25 2008, 12:15 PM
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Obese have the right to two seats: court
November 25, 2008 - 11:27AM

Obese people have the right to two seats for the price of one on flights within Canada, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled on Thursday.

The high court declined to hear an appeal by Canadian airlines of a decision by the Canadian Transportation Agency that people who are "functionally disabled by obesity" deserve to have two seats for one fare.

The airlines had lost an appeal at the Federal Court of Appeal in May and had sought to launch a fresh appeal at the Supreme Court. The court's decision not to hear a new appeal means the one-person-one-fare policy stands.

The appeal had been launched by Air Canada, Air Canada Jazz and WestJet.

Obese have the right to two seats

 
 


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