Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

167 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > »    
 
  
Reply to this topic

China the monster.
early birds
post Posted: Yesterday, 04:38 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 12,283
Thanks: 1295


https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/19/us-china-tr...f-commerce.html

The business community and American workers want a deal that is sustainable, that changes the trajectory of our bilateral relationship," Brilliant said.
================

American first!!! i guess China will bow to USA , because it has bigger muscles [ military power]/ lmaosmiley.gif
isn't it how things works always ??????



 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Yesterday, 11:13 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,658
Thanks: 590


In Reply To: early birds's post @ Yesterday, 09:09 AM

No worries EB, if you go back further to when we were all convicts, all the trade was with Mother England!
We don't seem to learn from past mistakes.
Mick




--------------------
sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
early birds
post Posted: Yesterday, 09:09 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 12,283
Thanks: 1295


In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Feb 18 2019, 03:21 PM

know you are a biz man Mick.
so, if any biz rely on one single customer that would be disadvantage .

aussies use to rely on USA, then Japs, now ,chinese .
for aussies , just sell as much nature resource as higher price as we can, no matter who the hell we sell to, right??

i might be biased as i'm a chinese oregon.
but what i point out is real facts that without fabrication.

hope aussie can have more chioce, but the reality tell the different story----sadly!! devilsmiley.gif




Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  
 
nipper
post Posted: Feb 18 2019, 03:39 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,214
Thanks: 1921


In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Feb 18 2019, 03:21 PM

But totally unrelated to anything else happening
QUOTE
- The Liberal, Labor and National parties were targeted in the February 8 attack
- Authorities are yet to detect any evidence of electoral interference from the hack
- PM Scott Morrison says a "sophisticated state actor" is responsible
- sleep well, chill'uns

"Any plan conceived in moderation must fail when the circumstances are set in extremes". - Metternich



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Feb 18 2019, 03:21 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,658
Thanks: 590


Once again, the dangers of relying on China for trade has been demonstrated.

QUOTE
Dozens of vessels carrying Australian coal continue to be in limbo off the coast of China as restrictions on imports are introduced at key ports across the country.

Beijing imposed import restrictions in January, primarily in the north-east of the country, to boost domestic coal prices with no indication of when they might be lifted.

Tania Constable, CEO of the Minerals Council of Australia, said companies were "deeply concerned" about the restrictions and the uncertainty of when they would be lifted.

"We believe an unofficial quota system [has been] employed since the restructure of customs and quarantine administrative arrangements in October 2018," she said.

In 2016, the Chinese government restricted coal miners' working days from 330 to 276 days per year.

This was seen as an attempt to cut back on domestic production of low-grade brown coal and improve the environment and air quality.

Subsequently, imports of higher-grade coal increased, as did the price of coal worldwide.

Rural news in your inbox?
Subscribe for the national headlines of the day.

But by year's end, the working day restrictions had eased and Beijing began to re-exert control over its domestic mining sector.

Vivek Dhar, a commodities analyst at Commonwealth Bank, said it was during this time Beijing began turning the tap on and off to imports of Australian coal.

"[Chinese] policy on coal has very dramatically shifted over the last three to four years, but particularly over the last year [as] import restrictions have been fiddled with," he said.

"Mid-November is where we saw the most aggressive push towards a policy of capping coal import levels and that was probably the most prominent move, similar to this, we've seen."

How long will it last?
Beijing indicated last year its goal to keep 2018 imports at 2017 levels.

This was not achieved, but led to a steep drop in coal imports in December before surging in January to the highest level in five years, according to figures released by China's General Administration of Customs.

The latest round of restrictions was imposed about a week before the Lunar New Year celebrations, a national holiday for China, which added to the uncertainty.

"There's still a lot of confusion," Mr Dhar said.

"Given the holiday period, it's very difficult to know exactly what's causing this issue and finding the right people to contact."

In the meantime, the thermal coal price at Newcastle port, which accounts for 25 per cent of Australia's thermal coal, is down to its lowest point since May 2018.

What is the impact?
China is heavily reliant upon Australian coking coal, which accounts for approximately 75 per cent of the coal used in Chinese steel production.

China relationship isn't broken

Australia's relationship with China is not in crisis, but no-one would blame you for thinking that, writes Stephen Dziedzic.

But concerns over slowing growth saw steel production in the country slow towards the end of 2018 as profitability collapsed.

Ms Constable said talks were ongoing with the Chinese embassy in Canberra and stressed the negative impact restrictions would have on the industry if allowed to continue.

"The longer these sorts of delays go on, of course it does have an effect overall on production and that has a flow-on effect to other parts of business," she said.

"A lot of discussion is occurring with customers in China and with the traders themselves, and plans are being made to try and get to the bottom of it."

Some reports said restrictions would ease in a few weeks, others said a few months.

Ultimately, only time will tell.


Chinese authorities turn the taps on and off as it suits them.
Personally, I would be wary of having the bulk of my income reliant on China.

Mick




--------------------
sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jan 20 2019, 07:36 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,415
Thanks: 2081


Interesting read - also the video showing the ghost towns
China's looming great wall of debt may have 'major global implications'
By Tasha Wibawa
Posted earlier today at 5:49am
QUOTE
While many countries struggled following the 2008 global financial crisis, China appeared as though it had largely escaped unscathed.

But observers are becoming increasingly concerned Beijing will struggle to repay an ever-increasing mountain of debt, with potential detrimental consequences for the global market.

China's debt has been a key factor to its economic success in riding out the GFC, due to a large government stimulus injected into its economy.

However, the financial boost has mostly led to China having one of the highest corporate debts in the world, only second to the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong.

The past year has been a tumultuous one for the Chinese market: it was hit by an economic downturn, and for the first time in two years, exports unexpectedly plunged to its lowest point, all of this against the backdrop of an ongoing trade dispute and punishing tariffs by the US.

Beijing made moves to solve its issues by slashing central bank reserves earlier this month — the fifth time within a year — freeing up $US116 billion ($161.3 billion) to stimulate more economic growth.

But forecasted figures by a number of global financial institutions are not looking too positive for the global superpower, and adding to the debt fears is an opaqueness and inability for analysts to completely obtain information and understand the full extent or impact of the potential looming problem


QUOTE
According to the Bank for International Settlement (BIS), China's overall debt currently sits at 255.7 per cent of its gross domestic product (GDP), with its corporate debt standing at 160.3 per cent, well ahead of Japan and the US.

However, the concerns do not surround the amount of China's accumulated debt, but rather the rate of its corporate debt and its growth since the GFC, which also includes State-Owned Enterprises (SOE) and local governments, prompting fears of a financial crisis with a domino effect.


read more - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-20/chin...ection=business



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 


triage
post Posted: Jan 18 2019, 06:36 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 3,681
Thanks: 1461


In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 18 2019, 05:00 PM

Nip - At the moment I'm reading a book called "The Tiananmen Papers" which is a chronologue of internal Communist Party reports leading up to the 4 June massacre. The striking thing for me is how all along Deng Xiao Ping and the other elders wanted to close down the "turmoil" being caused throughout China by university students protesting because it put at risk the clear strategy of reform and opening of China. Even though Li Ping should have been installed as the boss of the Communist Party during this period, Deng and Co plucked a little known Jiang Zemin out of Shanghai who had no experience in the Party Central in Beijing to be the big boss. Li was rejected by the elders to a large extent because he was a conservative not a reformer whereas Jiang was a pragmatist who knew to follow the codified instructions of the Party elders.

So this strategy of economic reform and opening - political reform and opening was never a starter - had been in place from Deng and Chen Yun to Jiang and onto Hu Jintao which is a span of about 35 years. It is true that it seems that Xi Jinping is attempting to turn back the tide by effectively renationalising much of the Chinese economy but it might be some time yet before we know that Xi's strategy is worse or better than the reform and opening strategy.




--------------------
"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 18 2019, 05:00 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,214
Thanks: 1921


QUOTE
Germany's top industry organisation [has] called time on the myth Xi ever intended to open up China's economy.

"China is no longer developing structurally in the direction of a market economy and liberalism but is in the process of consolidating its own political, economic and social model," the Federation of German Industries (BDI) said in a position paper calling for a tougher line on China from the European Union.

"The Chinese model of an economy marked by substantial state control thus enters into systemic competition with liberal market economies."

This statement – a more sophisticated version of US President Donald Trump's mantra that "China has been ripping us off for years" – shows German industry, the epitome of rational policy making, now sees China as more threat than opportunity.

https://www.afr.com/news/world/asia/how-did...20181127-h18e36

- meantime, the relativities have altered; hard to prise loose the grip on sectors of the global economy



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jan 15 2019, 10:04 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,415
Thanks: 2081


Interesting article appearing in The New York Times - Competing Against Chinese Loans, U.S. Companies Face Long Odds in Africa

QUOTE
China is aggressively seeking investments and contracts around the world, and perhaps nowhere is this more visible than Africa, where Chinese companies have won contracts to build dams, roads, stadiums, airports and railways. In country after country, governments have borrowed heavily from China to pay for these projects.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/13/world/af...africa-usa.html



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
triage
post Posted: Jan 10 2019, 08:40 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 3,681
Thanks: 1461


"Beijing has announced it has deployed intermediate ballistic missiles to the country's north-west region, saying the weapons have the capacity to destroy US ships entering disputed waters in the South China Sea....


...Late last year, Chinese Navy Rear Admiral Luo Yuan suggested Beijing could sink two US carriers in a bid to deter the US from entering the South China Sea.

Admiral Lou was quoted in Taiwanese media as stating that destroying two carrier would kill around 10,000 US personnel, claiming that this would be the best way to hurt the US as 'America is most afraid of the death of its people.'"

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-10/chin...-ships/10705594

I don't think the Chinese are that stupid or ill-informed. The US came into existence on the battlefield and ever since has been a warrior nation, having fought against just about every major nation, in a steady procession of wars. They are not "most afraid" of the death of their countrymen, rather that is what riles them the most. They have tens of thousands of battle tested soldiers, and hundreds of senior officers that know how to fight and win battles and wars. Pretty much all of their military technology has been on-the-job tested and they still possess overwhelming military force. Mao thought he could overpower the US in the Korean War by inflicting maximum casualties on them but he was wrong. The US public opinion against the Vietnam War turned as much from the pointless loss of Vietnamese lives as American lives. And of course the attack on Pearl Harbour by the Japanese turned American public opinion from a disinterest in getting involved in the war to being fully in favour of it.

In contrast the last time the Chinese faced an enemy force was the Sino-Vietnam war in the late 70's in which the battle-hardened Vietnamese belted the snot out of the Chinese forces (though strategically Deng achieved what he set out to do) and Vietnam was only acting defensively. Not saying that the Chinese would be a walk-over or are not an impressive military power, but I do think it is naive to think the Americans would turn chicken.



--------------------
"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog
 
 


167 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > » 

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING