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SMN, STRUCTURAL MONITORING SYSTEMS PLC
ChromeDome01
post Posted: Apr 26 2021, 04:50 PM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Apr 19 2021, 11:10 AM

Dazmo, from that article it looks like the race is on. The article is more focused on A.I. than current technologies. It mentioned CVM only to show that some research was conducted. The way I took this article was "Hey with have this & that, but over here we have Robotics and Automation.".

Don't mention the FAA process to adoption. The article is where it should be, in the recycle bin.


 
dr_dazmo
post Posted: Apr 19 2021, 11:10 AM
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Hi All,
Saw this & thought it would be of interest:

https://www.imeche.org/news/news-article/st...apped-operators

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo



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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Apr 7 2021, 10:18 PM
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Hi All,
Positive news from SMN today that the POD testing data for the Gogo B737-800 2Ku Wifi STC has been submitted to the FAA. biggrin.gif
FAA feedback is expected prior to the end of Q2 21 for review of the test data and to return any follow up questions.

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo





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Always remember the Golden Rule - Those with the Gold make the Rules!
 
dr_dazmo
post Posted: Mar 30 2021, 05:45 AM
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https://people.com/travel/american-airlines...since-pandemic/

American Airlines Says Travel Bookings Have Recovered to 90 Percent of Pre-Pandemic Levels

American Airlines is seeing a staggering increase in travel bookings in comparison to its record low numbers throughout 2020 due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

On Monday, the Texas-based air carrier — which lost more than $8.9 billion last year — said in a regulatory filing that net bookings are at 90 percent of the company's pre-pandemic 2019 average, with 80 percent of seats onboard being filled.

"Due to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention order to require a negative COVID-19 test for entry into the U.S. at the beginning of 2021, the Company experienced softness in its bookings at the beginning of the first quarter," American Airlines said. "However, as infection and hospitalization rates have materially declined and vaccine distribution has increased during the quarter," the company says it has experienced an increase in bookings.

The airline went on to say that it expects the upward trend to continue.

Air travel has sharply increased in recent weeks as more Americans get vaccinated. On Sunday, the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screened 1.57 billion passengers, the highest number since March 2020, according to Reuters.





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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Mar 26 2021, 06:14 PM
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Hi All,
Thanks to Hatrack over on HC for the below link!

https://aviationweek.com/mro/podcast/podcas...itoring-sensors

Some of my favourite bits from David Piotrowski - Delta TechOps:

"We have a variety of applications in with both Boeing and Airbus, to basically do the same thing for a specific task, use structural health monitoring as an alternate inspection, and with that is going to be a huge savings for our operation."

"We literally have dozens of applications across all fleet types. This literally is a stepping stone to wider applications and accelerating the implementation of more efficient maintenance practices."

"There are other applications, the 737 aft pressure bulkhead is probably the most likely and we have actually installed sensors on 20 different aircraft and have worked with Boeing on applying for an AMOC (alternative method of compliance to do those inspections. Literally the aft galley is in the way of the inspections. And so when you need to do that inspection, it's a significant burden, [b]it takes three to five days of maintenance and being out of service[/b]. Using the structural health monitoring option, we can route the monitoring lines to a convenient location and l[b]iterally can do it in probably 30 minutes to an hour[/b]."

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo



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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Mar 24 2021, 06:55 PM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Feb 28 2021, 03:12 PM

Hi All,
Saw this in relation to flight cycles & thought it was relevant despite its age (2008).

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo

https://www.airspacemag.com/need-to-know/wh...espan-29533465/

What determines an airplane’s lifespan?
Some keep flying for decades, while others end up on the scrap heap

By Rebecca Maksel
AIRSPACEMAG.COM
MARCH 1, 2008

A reader asks: "Two articles in the Feb./Mar. 2007 issue of Air & Space raised a question. One was about the last flying examples of a number of classic planes ("And Then There Was One"). The other was about newer jetliners, too old to fly, being chopped up to make skateboards and soft drink cans ("We Recycle"). It struck me as odd that the old planes are still airworthy, while the jetliners are fit only for the scrap heap. Why can some planes seemingly keep flying forever, while other, newer ones are already used up?"

An aircraft's lifespan is measured not in years but in pressurization cycles. Each time an aircraft is pressurized during flight, its fuselage and wings are stressed. Both are made of large, plate-like parts connected with fasteners and rivets, and over time, cracks develop around the fastener holes due to metal fatigue.

What determines an airplane’s lifespan?
Some keep flying for decades, while others end up on the scrap heap
boeing737-631-mar08.jpg
A row of 737-800s at Boeing Field in Seattle. (Boeing)
By Rebecca Maksel
AIRSPACEMAG.COM
MARCH 1, 2008
2326
A reader asks: "Two articles in the Feb./Mar. 2007 issue of Air & Space raised a question. One was about the last flying examples of a number of classic planes ("And Then There Was One"). The other was about newer jetliners, too old to fly, being chopped up to make skateboards and soft drink cans ("We Recycle"). It struck me as odd that the old planes are still airworthy, while the jetliners are fit only for the scrap heap. Why can some planes seemingly keep flying forever, while other, newer ones are already used up?"

An aircraft's lifespan is measured not in years but in pressurization cycles. Each time an aircraft is pressurized during flight, its fuselage and wings are stressed. Both are made of large, plate-like parts connected with fasteners and rivets, and over time, cracks develop around the fastener holes due to metal fatigue.


"Aircraft lifespan is established by the manufacturer," explains the Federal Aviation Administration's John Petrakis, "and is usually based on takeoff and landing cycles. The fuselage is most susceptible to fatigue, but the wings are too, especially on short hauls where an aircraft goes through pressurization cycles every day." Aircraft used on longer flights experience fewer pressurization cycles, and can last more than 20 years. "There are 747s out there that are 25 or 30 years old," says Petrakis.

How do airlines determine if metal fatigue has developed in their passenger-liners? Bob Eastin, an FAA specialist on aircraft fatigue, says, "[Airlines] are really relying on the manufacturer's maintenance programs. The manufacturers design the aircraft to be trouble-free for a certain period of time. There are maintenance actions to preclude any catastrophic failures, but that's not to say that the aircraft might not [experience metal fatigue] before those times…. When you get to a certain point [in the aircraft's lifespan], you need to inspect or replace certain parts."

Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are used both during production (to ensure that components start out free of defects) and during an aircraft's service life to detect cracks as small as 0.04 inch. Inspectors might, for example, take a close look at fastener holes located at the wing and spar junction.

We contacted NDE experts Deborah Hopkins of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Guillaume Neau, of Bercli, LLC, who together answered in an e-mail: "The challenge in developing an easier and less expensive inspection strategy is to design a technique that can be used from the skin side (of the wing), that does not require removal of the fastener, and that provides the same or better resolution than the conventional method of removing the fastener." Not having to remove the fastener is a big money-saver.

One commonly used method of NDE is ultrasonic phased-array testing, which analyzes the echoes from ultrasonic waves to reveal imperfections inside a material. By using several ultrasonic beams instead of just one, then varying the time delays between the beams, inspectors can look inside a material at different locations and depths, thereby determining the size and shape of any defects.

At present, million-dollar robotic inspection systems equipped with phased arrays are being used to inspect wings and composite fuselages for large commercial aircraft and jetfighters before they fly. "Most aircraft manufacturers and service providers—Dassault Aviation, Airbus, and Boeing, for instance—ensure the quality of their production with large-scale non-destructive testing systems," Neau wrote in an e-mail. And while a million dollars may sound like a lot, "when put in perspective, the number is not so large," he says. "If manufacturers discover a problem after assembly, the cost of dismantling and redoing the part or the scrappage waste is much higher than the inspection cost."






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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Mar 20 2021, 10:26 AM
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Hi All,
Potentially good news for SMN (generally).
I assume that IF the FAA become more active in inspections (and require more monitoring), etc, Boeing & Operators will be looking for cost saving measures to both minimize the impact of those inspections & ensure that their aircraft remain active service as much as possible.


Dr_Dazmo

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/analysis-boe...-014031014.html

Analysis: New Boeing 787 inspections signal tougher FAA oversight





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draughtsman
post Posted: Feb 28 2021, 04:22 PM
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In Reply To: dr_dazmo's post @ Feb 28 2021, 03:12 PM

Interesting detail dr_dazmo.


Makes one wonder about the operational cycles airlines must make their aircraft perform each day - and then how old are these aircraft?

By my calculations 3 flights or cycles per day with an inspection at 30,000 cycles make the aircraft 27 years old or 10,000 days. I’d be damned sure I would want it inspected.

4 flights per day make the aircraft 20 years old and 5 flights per day make it 16 years old. Do the airlines retire these things? I think I would want to see the check sheet myself before I boarded some of these aircraft - It’s a wonder we aren’t boarding DC3’s or Super Constellations.

It must be that the number of cycles per day must be very high – they must never stop working.







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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Feb 28 2021, 03:12 PM
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Aircraft with more than 30,000 cycles (roughly, each cycle may be understood as one flight) must be inspected within seven days, and those with 22,600-29,999 cycles must be inspected within 1,000 cycles, which typically correspond to the number of flights.





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dr_dazmo
post Posted: Feb 19 2021, 05:16 PM
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HI All,
More news out of AEM.

Cheers
Dr_Dazmo

https://www.aem-corp.com/about-us/recent-ne...uard-alh-mk-iii

AEM Equipment on Indian Navy and Indian Coast Guard ALH Mk III

FEB 17 2021



Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) delivered three Mk III Advanced Light Helicopters (ALH) to the Indian Navy and two to the Indian Coast Guard, all five of which were outfitted with AEM loudspeaker systems. The delivery was announced at Aero India 2021 and is part of a 32 ALH contract between the state-owned airframer and the respective Indian agencies. Despite COVID-19 restrictions and production delays, the remaining Mk III helicopters are on target to be delivered within the contract delivery deadlines.

AEM provided a 700-watt public address system for the ALH featuring a 6-bell speaker array that HAL integrated using a custom external mount. AEM’s loudspeaker and siren solutions have been proven to compensate for the high noise levels and rotor wash common in their operating environment. In addition to the AEM loudspeaker system, the multi-mission ALH aircraft includes other state-of-the-art mission equipment such as a medical intensive care unit (MICU), high-intensity search light (HISL), surveillance radar system and more.

For the past 10 years, AEM has also been providing loudspeaker systems for the HAL-built Do-228 light transport aircraft. “Our contribution to the Mk III is a continuation of our collaboration with HAL” said Tony Weller, Director of Sales and Marketing at AEM. “The success of this project is the outcome of a valuable OEM relationship for AEM, and we look forward to supporting them in future developments.”





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