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Climate, Earth's Climate
tombeet
post Posted: Yesterday, 03:17 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Jan 23 2020, 04:51 PM

Joules,
Very informative video, based on actual facts.But it does not matter how good it tells the story, you will still get 360 people giving it the thumbs down.
9.8k Thumbs up tongue.gif
Cheers
Tom.

 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Yesterday, 07:56 AM
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To the people who wonder why I don't jump on the Climate change Bandwagon and remain as cynical as ever, I suggest you all have a read of this ABC NEWS article.


QUOTE
An Aboriginal not-for-profit company says a successful program of prescribed burning to prevent wildfires in northern Australia had earned Indigenous groups and landholders millions in carbon credits, and should be considered for the country's south.
There have been mounting calls to increase Indigenous cultural burning to reduce bushfire risk, and the topic was on the agenda at a Ministerial Roundtable on the Bushfire Environment Response this weekThe Emissions Reduction Fund has issued nearly 7 million Australian Carbon Credit Units (ACCUs) to 76 projects aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from intense, late-season blazes in fire-prone tropical savannas by conducting controlled burns in the cooler months.

Nearly half the savanna burning projects are managed or carried out by Indigenous Australians.

The Aboriginal Carbon Foundation has been involved in about a dozen of the projects, providing training and support, and obtaining a premium price for the proponents' carbon credits.
Each carbon credit unit represents one tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent stored or avoided being released into the atmosphere.

Map of Australia with markers across the top of WA, NT and Queensland
PHOTO: Savanna burning projects registered under the Emissions Reduction Fund across northern Australia. (Supplied: Clean Energy Regulator)
With the average price per tonne of abatement $14.17, it means the projects combined have earned at least $98 million worth of carbon credits.

The credits can then be sold back to the Federal Government or passed on to businesses, who often pay a premium price to offset their emissions while ticking off other corporate social responsibility targets.

One group that has turned savanna burning into a lucrative business is the Olkola Aboriginal Corporation of Queensland's Cape York Peninsula, which has earned about $3 million in carbon credits since 2014.

The group is one of the largest landholders on Cape York, managing 869,822 hectares of its traditional country.

Chief executive Debbie Symonds said about 60 per cent of the corporation's revenue was from carbon abatement, allowing it to diversify its business interests.


So, we are paying people to light fires.
These fires emit CO2. So they contribute to carbon Pollution, but its so much better than regular pollution.
But wait, thats not all. With each ton of carbon saved, they get carbon credits which they can sell back to the government.
So its a double whammy.
It would seem that somehow, carbon released by Aboriginal prescribed burning is much better than regular carbon, and is worth more.
The write of the article obviously sees no irony in this.
Is this the double good Newspeak that George Orwell wrote about in 1984??

A cynical Mick




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joules mm1
post Posted: Jan 23 2020, 08:50 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 23 2020, 06:01 PM

..there i go

did you watch the video ?



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 23 2020, 06:01 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Jan 23 2020, 04:51 PM

there you go, being linear again



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Jan 23 2020, 04:51 PM
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this entry refers directly to Australia

very useful, instructional, educational, give yourself a clue kinda video
it's a straightforward video, easy to digest

you should watch it to see it you can pull it apart with common sense
of course, common sense is the very thing that causes the challenges we have, common sense was once referred-to as "lazy thinking"which is nowadays confused with normal thinking

https://youtu.be/t0x46-enxsA
Attached File  Aussie_Berkely_mean_temp.png ( 372.45K ) Number of downloads: 1

Attached File  Aussie_BOM_LASTA.png ( 438.57K ) Number of downloads: 0









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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price

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nipper
post Posted: Jan 21 2020, 07:49 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Jan 21 2020, 12:59 PM

I tend to agree, about the hijacking. This little spiel:
QUOTE
"As human populations grow and encroach on the natural habitats of other species through climate change, and as species move into areas where they have not encountered humans before, we do see these spillover effects".
is so much bulldust.

I remember a vet telling me, in SE Asia in the 1980's : "Humans, pigs and poultry (usually ducks) in southern Chinese villages are the perfect incubator situation", living as they do cheek and jowl. Nothing has changed, apart from the sophistication of the response. In those days, the flu viruses came with a H prefix, denoting Hong Kong which is where the new strains were first identifed.

This new coronavirus is another manifestation, the response is much quicker and sophisticated; why they're still looking for the transmission animal. But climate change. Naw; I don't think so (unless you're looking for funding)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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mullokintyre
post Posted: Jan 21 2020, 12:59 PM
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The Climate Change debate has been hi-jacked in so many ways its laughable.
1. My local grocer )(I will not name the entity) is urging all customers to donate 2$ in their payment to go to towards a"assisting communities affected by climate change induced bushfires'.
So what is likely to happen to my 2 bucks along with the other thousands of 2 bucks??
The Corporate entity will take all that and probably add a few thou of their own and make a public song and dance about their virtue as they hand the thous to some tax deductable charitable organisation.
And of course they will claimm the donation in total as a Tax deduction.
Of course this corporate entity is not alone in this. There are probably lots of others doing similar things.

2.According to the Australian
QUOTE
The world’s most powerful central banks have issued a stark warning that climate change could trigger the next financial crisis, as a “disruptive” shift in asset prices sparks an unpredictable “green swan” event and potentially leaves some economies unviable.

In an expansive new report, the Bank of International Settlements has warned that central banks around the world risk becoming “climate rescuers of last resort”.

This could involve spending billions of taxpayer dollars rescuing devalued assets or stranded investments to “save the financial system once more” in the event of a disruptive transition to a low-carbon ­economy, characterised by wild fluctuations in asset prices ­triggered by the warming of the planet or the policies put in place to achieve emissions targets.


What a convenient scapegoat. The fact that these same central Banks have fuelled numerous asset bubbles with their race to negative interest rates and constant injections of funds into banks etc is far more likely to cause the next GFC (assuming its not already here, we just havent noticed). Talk about self serving overpaid parasites. Their answer to climate change is to centralise more and more power nn the hands of these unelected elites.

Mick



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Pendragon
post Posted: Jan 17 2020, 05:42 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Jan 17 2020, 11:16 AM

“What happens in the future is really up to us," one scientist said.

So a carbon tax will fix everything??!! La la Land thinking.
Man has power over the winds the sea the air and the oceans. LOL
A 25% carbon tax will allow us to set the world temperature at a comfortable 23 Degrees all the year around. And rain will fall only where most needed.
Delusional fools.




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joules mm1
post Posted: Jan 17 2020, 11:16 AM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Jan 17 2020, 10:54 AM

thanks for the prompt, alonso smile.gif
2019 capped world’s hottest decade in recorded history
It also marked the second-warmest year ever. “What happens in the future is really up to us," one scientist said.

By Brady Dennis ,
Andrew Freedman and
John Muyskens
January 15
Attached File  10_year_hottest_days_on_record_170120.png ( 55.27K ) Number of downloads: 0
Source: NASA’s Goddard's Global Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-envi...ld/?arc404=true


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<li class="css-i49r68">here's one from Feb. 26, 2019<li class="css-60hakz">
LONDON — Two days of unseasonable sunshine in Britain this week have resulted in more than the shedding of hats, scarves and winter coats: They have also brought the highest temperatures ever recorded in the country in winter.

Temperatures peaked on Tuesday at 21.2 degrees Celsius (70.16 Fahrenheit) in Kew Gardens, London, the hottest February day in Britain since records began in 1910, according to the Met Office, the national meteorological service.

Warmer than an average summer day in Britain, the record set on Tuesday ended a short-lived run for Porthmadog, Wales, which had laid claim earlier in the day with a high of 20.8 degrees Celsius (69.44 Fahrenheit).

February’s new maximum temperature record was also snatched from the rural community of Trawsgoed, Wales, which had set a record on Monday with a high of 20.6 degrees Celsius (69.08 Fahrenheit).

The run of unusually hot days smashed the previous record of 19.7 degrees Celsius (67.46 Fahrenheit), set in the Greenwich area of London in February 1998.

“To get more than 20 degrees Celsius in May would be a very pleasant day. So to get that in February is obviously very significant,” said Grahame Madge, a spokesman for the Met Office. “Whether we will see that again next winter remains to be seen.”

The weather could not have been more different from a year ago, when Britons found themselves up against a polar vortex nicknamed the “Beast From the East.” On one of the coldest days in the U.K. for three decades, snow and high winds closed schools, stranded drivers and disrupted flights and trains.

The subzero temperatures extended far beyond Britain last winter. Norway recorded temperatures of minus 43 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 42 Celsius) at the start of March, and snow fell in Rome for the first time in six years.

The unseasonably balmy temperatures that sent Britons scrambling for sunglasses and T-shirts this week also broke records in Ireland, where the national meteorological service declared the February temperatures to be the hottest since 1960.

On the Continent, the Netherlands beat its oldest record for the warmest February day with a temperature of 17.8 degrees Celsius (64.04 Fahrenheit).

In France, temperatures were as high as 22 degrees Celsius (71 Fahrenheit), far above the average temperature for the time of year, and a number of towns in Sweden also experienced their hottest ever February days.

But as moods lifted with the unexpected taste of summer, some voiced a creeping sense of concern at such a dramatic shift from the norm.

The record temperature in Britain is “concerning, given what we known about climate science,” Leo Hickman, the director of a energy and climate fact-checking website, wrote on Twitter.

“This unseasonably warm weather is part of a global trend of record temperatures and unprecedented extremes,” Caroline Lucas, the former leader of Britain’s Green Party, wrote on Twitter. “This is what climate breakdown looks like.”

The Met Office tied the warm conditions to a vast high-pressure area centered over Germany. Warm air is being drawn up to Britain, prompting the record-breaking heat. Mr. Madge, the Met Office spokesman, said the same weather system was also the cause of last year’s freezing temperatures — but because that high-pressure area was centered over Scandinavia, cold air was drawn from the Arctic.

The meteorologists said they could not definitively link the extreme heat to climate change until a full study had been carried out, but Mr. Madge said: “We would expect temperatures in winter to be influenced by global warming and for temperatures to be warmer on average.”

“Simplistically, it does fit the pattern,” he added.

(no links were provided in the article to check the data)

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/26/world/eu...est-day-uk.html

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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
alonso
post Posted: Jan 17 2020, 10:54 AM
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I saw somewhere today that the UK's Met Office had declared the last 10 years the hottest since they started keeping

records in . . .(wait for it) . . .1850.






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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith

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