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RARE EARTHS
early birds
post Posted: Apr 12 2021, 09:33 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Apr 10 2021, 02:08 PM

https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-faces-uphi...od=hp_lead_pos6

Powerful magnets made of rare-earth minerals are essential components in electric-vehicle motors, wind turbines and other technology. China mines over 70% of the world’s rare earths and is responsible for 90% of the complex process of turning them into magnets, analysts say. That dominance gives Beijing sway over makers of various fast-growing technologies.

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so bet on aussie rare earth mining is the the better way to profit from current situation !! what stock should we look at it nipper?? tongue.gif unsure.gif unsure.gif



 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 10 2021, 02:08 PM
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raining money??

Leaning into our strengths – our pathway to a strong modern and resilient economy
QUOTE
There are manufacturing growth opportunities along the value chain in each of our National Manufacturing Priorities, with the potential to deliver long-term transformation outcomes for the Australian economy...

https://www.industry.gov.au/data-and-public...silient-economy

Funding available
QUOTE
The Modern Manufacturing Initiative is now open for resources technology and critical minerals processing projects that meet eligibility..
.
"Our Modern Manufacturing Initiative (MMI) will help position Australia not just as a global leader in the resources sector, but also in the manufacturing of the technology used, as well as turning the raw materials into value-added products," PM Scott Morrison

....The MMI initiative .... is a $1.3 billion fund to help manufacturers increase production, commercialise products and access global supply chains. While it's commendable for the government to want to support any lithium or other technology metals miners are willing to put forward, [an industry spokesperson] questions how well its road map has been thought out.

Given that Australia is already well on the way to becoming a global hub in innovative minerals processing, she's concerned that the modern manufacturing initiative outlined by the government could be decidedly unambitious. What this may indicate, she suggests , is that those responsible for developing the policy framework for the MMI initiative may not be close enough to the minerals processing industry to understand just how far it's come in recent years.

.... She also expects companies in the rare earth, and especially lithium, space to be highly favoured with this current round of funding. But given the grant process aims to fund efficient minerals extraction and processing, miners working within non-rare earth resources are also likely to receive funding, including iron ore and copper.




.... in other words, a dog's dinner.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Mar 12 2021, 05:13 PM
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Kitco.. RE production up 9%, weaning slowly off China

https://www.kitco.com/news/2021-03-11/Globa...ina-report.html



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Mar 3 2021, 03:05 PM
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AN article from UK on global RE opportunities.... About half a dozen AU players get mentioned. And what I find surprising, in that $500M is entry level development cost, there are several privately held concerns

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-rareeart...x-idUSKBN2AU0FX




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  
 
nipper
post Posted: Feb 26 2021, 02:05 PM
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from Lynas Half Yearly
Operational risks
2.1 Rare Earth prices Lynas' revenue is affected by market fluctuations in Rare Earth prices. This is because the product prices used in the majority of Lynas' sales are calculated by pricing formulae that reference published pricing for various Rare Earths materials. The market price has been volatile in the past because it is influenced by numerous factors and events that are beyond the control of Lynas.

These include:
• Supply side factors: Supply side factors are a significant influence on price volatility for Rare Earth materials. Supply of Rare Earth materials is dominated by Chinese producers. The Chinese Central Government regulates production via quotas and environmental standards. Over the past few years, there has been significant restructuring of the Chinese market in line with China Central government policy. However, periods of over supply or speculative trading of Rare Earths can lead to significant fluctuations in Rare Earth pricing.
• Demand side factors: Demand side factors are also a significant influence on price volatility for Rare Earth materials. Demand for end-products that utilise Lynas' Rare Earths including internal combustion vehicles, hybrid vehicles, electric vehicles and electronic devices fluctuates due to factors including global economic trends, regulatory developments and consumer trends.
• Geopolitical factors: Recently Rare Earths have been the focus of significant attention, including as a result of the recent trade tensions between the US and China. The table below illustrates how China domestic prices of NdPr (excluding VAT) have moved since July 2019:

NdPr China Domestic Price (VAT excluded) US$/kg
Q2 FY21 ... 48.7 US$/kg ... Q1 FY21... 40.8 .... Q4 FY20 .. 33.8 .... Q3 FY20 .. 35.9 .... Q2 FY20 .. 36.2 .... Q1 FY20 .. 39.0


Lynas' approach to reducing pricing volatility for its customers includes:
• Promoting fixed pricing to its direct customers, set for periods relevant to customer operations;
• Developing long term contracts that aim to reduce price variations for end users and OEMs such as car makers and wind turbine manufacturers.

Lynas achieved a small price premium compared to the NdPr market price, supported by:
• Sustained demand from the Japanese market and selected customers in China;
• The recognition by the market that Lynas is now well established as the second largest producer of Rare Earths in the world;
• End users placing more importance on being able to trace the origin of rare earths from a sustainable and auditable source of production to their end products, which Lynas can fulfil.

Strong Rare Earth prices, as well as real or perceived disruptions in supply, may create economic incentives to identify or create alternate technologies that ultimately could depress future long-term demand for Rare Earths. This may, at the same time, incentivise the development of additional mining properties to produce Rare Earths. If industries reduce their reliance on Rare Earth products, the resulting change in demand could have a material adverse effect on Lynas' business. In particular, if prices or demand for Rare Earths were to decline, this could impair Lynas' ability to obtain financing for current or additional projects and its ability to find purchasers for its products at prices acceptable to Lynas.

It is impossible to predict future Rare Earths price movements with certainty. Any sustained low Rare Earths prices or further declines in the price of Rare Earths, including as a result of periods of over-supply and/or speculative trading of Rare Earths, will adversely affect Lynas' business, results of operations and its ability to finance planned capital expenditures, including development projects.


2.2 Market competition Lynas' Rare Earths supply contracts and profits may be adversely affected by the introduction of new mining and separation facilities and any increase in competition in the global Rare Earths market, either of which could increase the global supply of Rare Earths and thereby potentially lower prices.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 31 2021, 07:39 PM
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Meaty New Scientist article ... Can we afford REs? No easy fix.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg2493...s-no-cheap-fix/



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


nipper
post Posted: Jan 17 2021, 05:19 PM
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is something stirring in Rare Earth land?
Of the 13 ASX listed stocks on my watchlist, most are positive and 5 are up by 10%+ for last Friday.

ARR up 23%, REE up 21%, ARU up 15%, NTU and VML up 12% ; with only one Market Sensitive asterix alongside NTU




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  rlane  
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 12 2021, 02:07 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Jan 12 2021, 11:04 AM

as posted elsewhere: Quite a few Australian companies claiming to be the Next RE producer, by whichever path. Selected excerpts from most recent Investor Presentations:

HAS: 30/11/20
"Next RE producer (non-China) coming to production by 2023; construction targeted to start Q2 2021."
ARU: 09/12/20
"Only Australian NdPr focused project that is shovel ready. Construction ... 6 mths; Commission & Ramp-up ... 24 months."
VML: 26/11/20
"Operations commencing 2021; Aim for the production of a minimum of 5,000t contained REO by 2025." (Canada)
PM8: 01/10/20
"..bankable feasibility study for Longonjo, alongside a final investment decision the roll out of the mine development plan and main financing of the Project is well on track for the development of the first major rare earth mine in over a decade." (Angola)
ASM: 09/01/21
"Construction of Dubbo Project - mid 2021; Commissioning late 2023."
PEK: 01/12/20
"Solid framework agreement will allow Export Credit Finance to be developed over the coming year, and then construction/start up over next 2 Years."(Tanzania)
REE; 09/12/20
"Strategy is to produce a saleable monazite concentrate to sell on an FOB / CIF basis to China. " ( undefined timeline)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jan 12 2021, 11:04 AM
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From China Power
QUOTE
As China’s economy has developed over the last several decades, its leaders have sought to transform the country into a key player in strategically important industries. Toward this end, Beijing has established China as the dominant global supplier of rare earths, a collection of 17 minerals that are indispensable to the manufacturing of smartphones, electric vehicles, military weapon systems, and countless other advanced technologies.

Beijing has demonstrated a willingness to leverage its weight in the global rare earth industry in pursuit of its political objectives, raising alarm bells in several major countries. However, China’s influence within the industry is likely to be eroded in the coming years as changing market dynamics empower new actors to compete.
Despite their name, most rare earth elements are relatively abundant. The process of mining rare earths and transforming them into usable materials is, however, expensive and damaging to the environment. For years, Beijing exploited its relatively low-cost labor force and lax environmental laws to gain a competitive edge in the global market and become the leading supplier of rare earths. From 2008 to 2018, China exported nearly 408,000 metric tons of rare earths, which amounted to 42.3 percent of all rare earth exports over the period. The United States was the second-largest exporter, supplying roughly 9.3 percent of the global total. Malaysia (9.1 percent), Austria (9.0 percent), and Japan (7.1 percent) rounded out the top five.Among these major economies, only Japan has achieved some success at reducing reliance on China. From 2008 to 2018, the share of Japanese rare earth imports from China fell from 91.3 percent to 58 percent. As of 2018, the US still imported 80.5 percent of its rare earths from China. The EU and South Korea have successfully diversified their imports of certain compounds, like cerium, but they remain almost completely reliant on China for imports of rare earth metals and alloys.2 For example, the EU imported 7,105.9 metric tons of cerium compounds in 2018, of which less than one-quarter came from China. However, nearly all (98.5 percent) of its imports of rare earth metals and alloys came from China.
[/While China maintains a commanding presence within the global rare earth industry, Beijing’s capacity to unilaterally disrupt supply chains is likely to be eroded in the coming years. A number of initiatives are underway that may prove successful at establishing new rare earth suppliers outside of China. Shifting market dynamics are likely to aid these efforts.

There are already signs that other players have started to chip away at China’s dominance in certain areas. Mining of raw rare earth materials outside of China has ramped up significantly in recent years as the US’ Mountain Pass mine, and other mines around the world, have increased their output. China’s share of global mining production has slipped as a result, from a high of 97.7 percent in 2010 to 62.9 percent in 2019 – the lowest point since 1995. China’s share of global rare earth reserves has likewise fallen from 50 percent to 36.7 percent over the same period.



Its a much longer article than what I can post here, but worth the full read for those interested in the REMs.
Mick




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nipper
post Posted: Jan 1 2021, 02:12 PM
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https://www.mining.com/web/miners-praise-us...nds-rare-earth/


Trump signs RE bill. ...



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


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