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India's Changing Economy
nipper
post Posted: Apr 7 2020, 07:02 PM
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Covis-19 lockdown in India... how does an economy with 80% of the workforce in day labour function, when the curtain comes down.

QUOTE
India has some 7,500 big wholesale farm markets and another 25,000 small weekly markets. "Some of them have begun reopening and they are trying to figure out how to operate and transport produce and maintain social distancing," says Dr Krishnamurthy.

.... the winter crop has been bountiful. India has a robust food stockpile - some 60 million tonnes of food grains - and the world's largest state-run food distribution programme. Food shortages are unlikely. But the challenges are in supporting farmers, sharecroppers and labourers until things return to normal; getting food to the poor and securing the harvest for the next season.


https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-52176564




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 27 2019, 10:26 AM
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QUOTE
India is on track to overtake ­Germany as the world’s fourth-largest economy by 2026, dumping all leading European economies out of the top flight as Asia continues its remarkable rise.

The forecast from the Centre for Economic and Business Research­ in its World Economic League table 2020 underscores the change in the world’s power dynamics this millennium.

In 2004, Germany, Britain and France were the third-, fourth- and fifth-largest economies after the US and Japan. Since then, China has raced into second place behind the US and India has overtaken Britain and France.

By 2026, the US will be the lone [dominant] Western power, .... the centre predicts

https://cebr.com/about-cebr/welt-2020/

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/world/the-...971c5d558114680



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Oct 20 2019, 12:02 PM
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India comes out well in terms of GDP growth over the next 15 years, with 4 cities in the top 10, of projections for emerging megacities.

Population and economic clout also shown*

https://www.visualcapitalist.com/top-10-cities/



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
solotak
post Posted: Aug 6 2019, 12:12 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 25 2019, 08:21 PM

"The Nifty50 is up 13.6% over the past year and 16.3% over five years."

NDIA ETF performance:
1 year performance -8.09%
5 year performance -9.66%

Doesn't look it's tracking the Nifty50 at all!

 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 25 2019, 08:21 PM
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QUOTE
ETF Securities has teamed with Reliance Nippon Life Asset Management, one of India’s largest asset managers, for the launch of its NDIA ETF. Reliance has a 23 year track record in India and has some $USD 61 billion under management.

NDIA will invest in a basket of stocks based on the Nifty50 Index – which comprises the 50 biggest listed companies listed on the National Stock Exchange (NSE), including HDFC Bank, Reliance Industries, Housing Development Finance Corporation, Infosys, ITC, ICICI Bank and Hindustan Unilever. It accounts for 13 sectors representing about 66.8% of the free float market capitalisation of the stocks listed on the NSE. The Nifty50 is up 13.6% over the past year and 16.3% over five years.

Until now, India has been difficult for offshore investors to access due to the country’s strict foreign investment rules.

Although there are a few unlisted “active” funds that invest in India, ETF Securities’ NDIA is the first vehicle for passive investment available to Australian investors.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
early birds
post Posted: Apr 16 2017, 11:16 PM
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I haven’t seen the argument that somehow this concessional loan is going to unlock tens of thousands of jobs,” Shorten said. “If this [project] is such a good deal, it won’t need the taxpayers of Australia to underwrite it.”

The Liberal Democrat senator David Leyonhjelm said on Sunday he was also opposed to the NAIF lending Adani any money.

“I wouldn’t like taxpayers’ money going to the benefit of a privately owned company,” he told Sky News on Sunday. “If the mine doesn’t stack up on its own merits then it shouldn’t proceed, it shouldn’t need taxpayers’ money to kick it along.”

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/a...should-be-doing

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very smart play by that indian rich boss i reckon. cool.gif
interesting to see how this gonna play out???? unsure.gif



 

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early birds
post Posted: Apr 4 2017, 10:21 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Apr 4 2017, 08:49 AM

mate,
sorry for the irrelevant video ---for indian economy
i just so amazed to see people can feed water to the king serpent with such ease. if i see this snake i would run away from it with speed of olympics sprinter. man!!! ohmy.gif

back to indian economy.
i'm little disappointed for their speed, since Modi been elected few years ago. i remember his best selling point is " we will catch up go pass to china".
to be honest, i see huge potential for india to take over china as the next world's growth engine, but so far seems Modi didn't deliver his promise .......
imagine, if india growing like what china did last 30 years-------man !! we aussies will have another good boom time for commodities.
i'm still hopeful though, as southeast asia all focus on their economics atm.




Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  
 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 4 2017, 08:49 AM
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http://www.bhpbilliton.com/media-and-insights/prospects/2016/11/india-the-elephant-in-the-room



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
early birds
post Posted: Mar 30 2017, 10:47 PM
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印度遭遇严重干旱 眼镜王蛇闯进村庄讨水喝 [ indian severe drought, cobra force into village bag for water}

http://news.sina.com.cn/zxt/?opsubject_id=top1#251097668

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man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ohmy.gif

 
Pendragon
post Posted: Mar 30 2017, 03:35 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Mar 30 2017, 02:49 PM

Nipper,

Thanks for that post.
Yep - definitely caught me napping!!!

Just a word of caution.
I lost money investing in China 20 years ago because the Chinese did not play by the rules.
I hope India is not the same. Buyer beware??

 
 


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