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TYR, TYRO PAYMENTS LTD
nipper
post Posted: Jan 14 2021, 06:53 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 11 2021, 07:32 PM

Fourth day in a row, the SP is down and closing near lows. From $3.30 last week, it is now at $2.63, which is not good for a fintech growth story.

Customers using the Tyro terminal are without connections still, and talk of class actions looms.
QUOTE
Class action lawyers investigate potential claims as Tyro reveals 19 per cent of customers have been left without a working terminal.
That is some 10,000 terminals, and into Day Ten. Even made it to the 6 o'clock news..... nobody uses cash any more.

A mischievous comment elsewhere would be the nail in TYR coffin. Imagine how many would return?!? Is it true that effected businesses could go to Officeworks, buy an SQ terminal and be up and running quickly with another provider?



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 11 2021, 07:32 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 19 2019, 11:41 AM

QUOTE
Tyro is experiencing a terminal connectivity issue with respect to a limited number of its EFTPOS terminals. The issue has been present since 7:00pm Tuesday 5 January 2021 and every effort is being made to achieve a resolution. To this end, Tyro is working closely with our terminal supplier, Worldline, who are assisting in the resolution effort.

Tyro is also doing all that it is able to mitigate the impact upon merchants with the issue appearing to impact ~15% of our terminal fleet as active in January 2021. At this stage the issue has caused a ~5% reduction in expected transaction values over the period in question.

TYR closed down on lows for the day, some 4%. Merchants are fuming. .... Some 100,000 terminals are down .... As the outage affecting thousands of eftpos machines stretches into a sixth day, irate small business owners are demanding compensation for merchant fees and lost revenue.

Ah, dependence on Third Party Suppliers.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 19 2019, 11:41 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 6 2019, 12:12 PM

QUOTE
Tyro Payments shares surged on the fintech’s ASX debut ...., signalling a return of confidence in the stalled initial public offer market, while delivering a multi-million-dollar windfall to a string of high-profile backers.

The tech payments company emerged with a valuation of $1.37bn after raising $287.2m from investors. After selling shares at $2.75 each, Tyro hit a peak of $3.55 at the open before easing to close at $3.38, capping off the biggest public float of 2019.

The bookbuild was strongly supported by institutional investors. Woolworths boss Brad Banducci and Atlassian co-founder and co-CEO Mike Cannon-Brookes are among Tyro’s top 20 investors.

Mr Banducci, whose stake was valued at $18.6m on Friday, served as the company’s chief financial officer, a director and later as a non-executive director before joining Woolworths. Mr Cannon-Brookes’ Grok Ventures is the largest shareholder in Tyro, with a 12.74 per cent stake, worth $174m.

Other notable shareholders include taxi booking and payments company ingogo’s CEO Garry Duursma, tech investor Danita Lowes and Tyro’s long-serving former CEO Jost Stollman
. made 3.60, and now trading around 3.40.[i]


QUOTE
Tyro is a payments-solution to retailers. The company services retailers, hospitality, and medical centres, and with 51,000 outlets, it transacts $17 billion annually, or 10% market share.

The benefit to the consumer is that it is highly reliable, has extra functionality (e.g.: splitting bills or adding tips), incorporates Alipay and Zip, and is fully integrated with the point of sale. Analyst Jun Bei sees further verticals being added in time, and flagged a move into travel.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 6 2019, 12:12 PM
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Posts: 7,914
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QUOTE
Fintech company and business lender Tyro Payments has debuted on the Australian Securities Exchange, with a market capitalisation of $1.37 billion in the biggest Australian float of 2019.

The listing followed an initial public offering jointly managed by JPMorgan and Morgan Stanley which saw demand from institutional investors vastly outweigh a strategically limited supply.

The IPO raised $287.2 million at a top-of-range price of $2.75 per share, above the $253 million initially flagged. It got off the blocks with a starting price of $3.30 and reached $3.53 in the first hour of trade.

At a bell ringing ceremony in Sydney, Tyro chief executive Robbie Cooke said the float allows the 16-year-old fintech to continue clawing market share from the major banks. "This process has made us a stronger challenger providing Australian businesses with better payments and banking solutions," he said.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 



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