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GRAPHENE, THE WONDER MATERIAL
nipper
post Posted: Yesterday, 03:27 PM
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Graphene Flagship has remained as committed as ever to their goal of fostering research, innovation and collaboration in Europe. Even through hard times, Graphene Flagship scientists still achieve excellent results, with great progress on many different fronts.


Here, we will take a look at some of our most popular news stories from 2020 that showcase exciting developments using graphene and layered materials, enabled by the Graphene Flagship:

https://graphene-flagship.eu/graphene/news/...tories-of-2020/

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The Graphene Flagship is a Future and Emerging Technology Flagship by the European Commission. With a budget of 1 billion, the Graphene Flagship represents a new form of joint, coordinated research on an unprecedented scale, forming Europe's biggest ever research initiative.





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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
surandy70
post Posted: Jan 6 2021, 09:59 PM
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Self-Charging Battery Technology

The battery technology is a liquid ink based on graphene oxide that is able to harvest energy from the humidity in the air or skin surface to self-charge themselves within minutes. The technology is being developed through collaboration with the University of New South Wales and CSIRO.

This technology targets the global multi-billion dollar battery market for IOT devices. It has the potential to enable batteries to self-charge from the humidity in the air, potentially removing the need for manual charging or wired powered.


https://www.strategicelements.com.au/projec...ortfolioCats=15


Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 6 2021, 10:16 AM
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Supercapacitors Challenge Batteries: Powerful Graphene Hybrid Material for Highly Efficient Energy Storage

https://scitechdaily.com/supercapacitors-ch...energy-storage/
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The team ... has now developed a novel, powerful as well as sustainable graphene hybrid material for supercapacitors. It serves as the positive electrode in the energy storage device. The researchers are combining it with a proven negative electrode based on titan[ium] and carbon.
....
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The stable connection between the nano-structured components has huge advantages in terms of long term stability: The more stable the bonds, the more charging and discharging cycles are possible without significant performance impairment.

For comparison: A classic lithium accumulator has a useful life of around 5,000 cycles. The new cell developed by the TUM researchers retains close to 90 percent capacity even after 10,000 cycles.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: lgrif  rlane  
 
nipper
post Posted: May 26 2020, 09:46 AM
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Graphene-enhanced Face Mask


SKU: GrapheneMask0010 $24.95 (pack of 3)


DESCRIPTION
planarTECH & IDEATI's 2AM graphene-enhanced face mask is a patent-pending design that employs a unique coating containing a combination of graphene and other carbon nanomaterials. This coating leverages both the antistatic and known antimicrobial characteristics of graphene to create a unique cotton fabric face mask.

FEATURES:

Anti-Static/Anti-Dust/PM2.5 ... The graphene coating is anti-static, repels dust, and is effective against PM2.5 airborne particulate matter;
Bacteria-resistant Surface ... The graphene coating provides a bacteria-resistant surface, keeping the mask clean and fresh;
Washable 10x ... Cotton fabric is washable and reusable up to 10 times without color fading or loss of the graphene coatings properties;
Thermal Distribution & Water-repellent Inner Layer ... The graphene coating spreads heat evenly across the mask; the inner cotton lining includes a water-repellent coating for additional comfort



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 4 2019, 08:49 AM
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12-18 month trial
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Talga (TLG) announced the commencement of a commercial-scale trial of a Talga graphene-enhanced coating applied to a 33,000t container ship.

Believed to be the world’s largest single application of graphene, the 700m2 coating of the cargo vessel’s hull is part of advanced testing of Talga’s functionalised graphene (Talphene®) additive as a performance booster for existing commercial marine coatings (part of the global 54 million tonne per annum paint and coating market).




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 13 2019, 05:56 PM
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QUOTE
A new graphene-based foam is the first material to remain soft and squishy even at deep cryogenic temperatures.

Most materials become stiff and brittle in extreme cold. But the new foam stays superelastic even when it’s subjected to the temperature of liquid helium: –269.15° Celsius. A material that remains pliable at such low temperatures could be used to build devices for use in space, researchers report online April 12 in Science Advances....

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/new-gra...st-temperatures



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  lgrif  
 


nipper
post Posted: Mar 26 2019, 04:47 PM
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Now, here's a twist
https://www-gizmodo-com-au.cdn.ampproject.o...-of-the-year%2F

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Last year, a team of physicists led by graduate student Yuan Cao made a discovery as close to shocking as science can get. They stacked a pair of graphene sheets on top of one another, cooled the system down to near absolute zero, and twisted one of the sheets to a 1.1-degree angle relative to the other.

They added a voltage, and the system became a kind of insulator such that the interactions between the particles themselves prevent electrons from moving. When they added more electrons, the system became a superconductor, a kind of system in which electrical charge can move without resistance.

But...
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Excitement for bilayer graphene stems from the physics that underlies it, not the promise that it will become useful in tech like quantum computers or solar panels. But the field likely won’t die soon.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Mar 16 2019, 02:36 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Mar 16 2019, 12:48 PM

QUOTE
...graphene .. may also exhibit properties of second sound at even higher temperatures approaching or exceeding room temperature...
- that's something to aim for. Recharging batteries, for one.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Mar 16 2019, 12:48 PM
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The wonders of Graphene.


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But now MIT researchers have observed this seemingly implausible mode of heat transport, known as “second sound,” in a rather commonplace material: graphite — the stuff of pencil lead.

At temperatures of 120 kelvin, or -240 degrees Fahrenheit, they saw clear signs that heat can travel through graphite in a wavelike motion. Points that were originally warm are left instantly cold, as the heat moves across the material at close to the speed of sound. The behavior resembles the wavelike way in which sound travels through air, so scientists have dubbed this exotic mode of heat transport “second sound.”

The new results represent the highest temperature at which scientists have observed second sound. What’s more, graphite is a commercially available material, in contrast to more pure, hard-to-control materials that have exhibited second sound at 20 K, (-420 F) — temperatures that would be far too cold to run any practical applications.

The discovery, published in Science, suggests that graphite, and perhaps its high-performance relative, graphene, may efficiently remove heat in microelectronic devices in a way that was previously unrecognized.

“There’s a huge push to make things smaller and denser for devices like our computers and electronics, and thermal management becomes more difficult at these scales,” says Keith Nelson, the Haslam and Dewey Professor of Chemistry at MIT. “There’s good reason to believe that second sound might be more pronounced in graphene, even at room temperature. If it turns out graphene can efficiently remove heat as waves, that would certainly be wonderful.”Normally, heat travels through crystals in a diffusive manner, carried by “phonons,” or packets of acoustic vibrational energy. The microscopic structure of any crystalline solid is a lattice of atoms that vibrate as heat moves through the material. These lattice vibrations, the phonons, ultimately carry heat away, diffusing it from its source, though that source remains the warmest region, much like a kettle gradually cooling on a stove.

The kettle remains the warmest spot because as heat is carried away by molecules in the air, these molecules are constantly scattered in every direction, including back toward the kettle. This “back-scattering” occurs for phonons as well, keeping the original heated region of a solid the warmest spot even as heat diffuses away.

However, in materials that exhibit second sound, this back-scattering is heavily suppressed. Phonons instead conserve momentum and hurtle away en masse, and the heat stored in the phonons is carried as a wave. Thus, the point that was originally heated is almost instantly cooled, at close to the speed of sound.

Previous theoretical work in Chen’s group had suggested that, within a range of temperatures, phonons in graphene may interact predominately in a momentum-conserving fashion, indicating that graphene may exhibit second sound. Last year, Huberman, a member of Chen’s lab, was curious whether this might be true for more commonplace materials like graphite.

Building upon tools previously developed in Chen’s group for graphene, he developed an intricate model to numerically simulate the transport of phonons in a sample of graphite. For each phonon, he kept track of every possible scattering event that could take place with every other phonon, based upon their direction and energy. He ran the simulations over a range of temperatures, from 50 K to room temperature, and found that heat might flow in a manner similar to second sound at temperatures between 80 and 120 K.

Huberman had been collaborating with Duncan, in Nelson’s group, on another project. When he shared his predictions with Duncan, the experimentalist decided to put Huberman’s calculations to the test.

“This was an amazing collaboration,” Chen says. “Ryan basically dropped everything to do this experiment, in a very short time.”

“We were really in the express lane with this,” Duncan adds.

Upending the norm

Duncan’s experiment centered around a small, 10-square-millimeter sample of commercially available graphite.

Using a technique called transient thermal grating, he crossed two laser beams so that the interference of their light generated a “ripple” pattern on the surface of a small sample of graphite. The regions of the sample underlying the ripple’s crests were heated, while those that corresponded to the ripple’s troughs remained unheated. The distance between crests was about 10 microns.

Duncan then shone onto the sample a third laser beam, whose light was diffracted by the ripple, and its signal was measured by a photodetector. This signal was proportional to the height of the ripple pattern, which depended on how much hotter the crests were than the troughs. In this way, Duncan could track how heat flowed across the sample over time.

If heat were to flow normally in the sample, Duncan would have seen the surface ripples slowly diminish as heat moved from crests to troughs, washing the ripple pattern away. Instead, he observed “a totally different behavior” at 120 K.

Rather than seeing the crests gradually decay to the same level as the troughs as they cooled, the crests actually became cooler than the troughs, so that the ripple pattern was inverted — meaning that for some of the time, heat actually flowed from cooler regions into warmer regions.

“That’s completely contrary to our everyday experience, and to thermal transport in almost every material at any temperature,” Duncan says. “This really looked like second sound. When I saw this I had to sit down for five minutes, and I said to myself, ‘This cannot be real.’ But I ran the experiment overnight to see if it happened again, and it proved to be very reproducible.”

According to Huberman’s predictions, graphite’s two-dimensional relative, graphene, may also exhibit properties of second sound at even higher temperatures approaching or exceeding room temperature. If this is the case, which they plan to test, then graphene may be a practical option for cooling ever-denser microelectronic devices.

“This is one of a small number of career highlights that I would look to, where results really upend the way you normally think about something,” Nelson says. “It’s made more exciting by the fact that, depending on where it goes from here, there could be interesting applications in the future. There’s no question from a fundamental point of view, it’s really unusual and exciting.”

ya gotta love science, as distinct from modelling.

Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  lgrif  
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 17 2018, 02:33 PM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Nov 17 2018, 01:55 PM

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the lack of standards for graphene production gives rise to bad quality of the material sold in the open market. This has been stalling the development of the future applications...
- I could imagine this is a real problem. Inconsistency, too.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


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