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Renewable Energy, Alternative energy, New energy, Solar, Geothermal, Wind
blacksheep
post Posted: May 24 2018, 07:08 PM
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Interesting assessment from IEA - International Energy Agency - of a full range of energy technologies and sectors that are critical in a global clean-energy transition. It includes the most up-to-date information for where technologies are today and where they need to be according to the IEA’s Sustainable Development Scenario, a pathway to reach the Paris Agreement well below 2°C climate goal, deliver universal energy access and significantly lower air pollution.

QUOTE
Are clean energy technologies on track with a well below 2°C scenario?
Some technologies have made tremendous progress in 2017 – particularly solar PV, LEDs and EVs – but most are not on track. Energy efficiency improvements have slowed and progress on key technologies like carbon capture and storage remains stalled.

Click on a sector or technology for a detailed assessment of recent trends and progress. http://www.iea.org/tcep/


QUOTE
The International Energy Agency’s new and most comprehensive analysis of the clean-energy transition finds that only 4 out of 38 energy technologies and sectors were on track to meet long-term climate, energy access and air pollution goals in 2017.

The findings are part of the IEA’s latest Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP), a newly updated website released today that assesses the latest progress made by key energy technologies, and how quickly each technology is moving towards the goals of the IEA’s Sustainable Development Scenario (SDS).

Some technologies made tremendous progress in 2017, with solar PV seeing record deployment, LEDs quickly becoming the dominant source of lighting in the residential sector, and electric vehicle sales jumping by 54%. But IEA analysis finds that most technologies are not on track to meet long-term sustainability goals. Energy efficiency improvements, for example, have slowed and progress on key technologies like carbon capture and storage remains stalled. This contributed to an increase in global energy-related CO2 emissions of 1.4% last year.

TCEP provides a comprehensive, rigorous and up-to-date analysis of the status of the clean-energy transition across a full range of technologies and sectors, their recent progress, deployment rates, investment levels, and innovation needs. It is the result of a bottom-up approach backed by the IEA’s unique understanding of markets, modeling and energy statistics across all fuels and technologies, and its extensive global technology network, totaling 6,000 researchers across nearly 40 technology collaboration programmes.

The analysis includes a series of high-level indicators that provide an overall assessment of clean energy trends and highlight the most important actions needed for the complex energy sector transformation.

For the first time, the analysis also highlights more than 100 key innovation gaps that need to be addressed to speed up the development and deployment of these clean energy technologies. It provides an extensive analysis of public and private clean energy research and development investment. It found that total public spending on low-carbon energy technology innovation rose 13% in 2017, to more than USD 20 billion.

“There is a critical need for more vigorous action by governments, industry, and other stakeholders to drive advances in energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Dr Fatih Birol, the IEA’s Executive Director. “The world doesn’t have an energy problem but an emissions problem, and this is where we should focus our efforts.”

A total of 11 of 38 technologies surveyed by the IEA were significantly not on track. In particular, unabated coal electricity generation (meaning generation without Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage, or CCUS), which is responsible for 72% of power sector emissions, rebounded in 2017 after falling over the last three years.

Meanwhile, two technologies, onshore wind and energy storage, were downgraded this year, as their progress slowed. This brought the number of technologies “in need of improvement” to a total of 23.

This year, the TCEP tracks progress against the Sustainable Development Scenario, introduced in the World Energy Outlook 2017, which depicts a rapid but achievable transformation of the energy sector. It outlines a path to limiting the rise of average global temperatures to “well below 2°C,” as specified in the Paris Agreement, as well as increasing energy access around the world and reducing air pollution.

In this scenario, meeting long-term sustainability goals requires an ambitious combination of more energy efficient buildings, industry and transport, and more renewables and flexibility in power.

The findings this year are compiled in an updated website, which provides easy navigation across technologies and sectors, and draws links across the IEA’s resources. The report will be updated throughout the year as new data becomes available, and will be complemented by cutting-edge analysis and commentary on notable developments on the global clean energy transition.

The findings for each technology and sector will be updated on a continuous basis with the latest information and findings from the IEA. Find out more at www.iea.org/tcep/.




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 8 2017, 09:01 AM
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In Reply To: triage's post @ Dec 8 2017, 06:29 AM

Factoid of the day ... GE was included in the initial Dow Jones index compilation, in late 18th Century, and has been there ever since. (due mainly to ability to innovate)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
triage
post Posted: Dec 8 2017, 06:29 AM
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The winds of change ...

GE, once the biggest company in the world and the only company that has been in the Dow Index since its inception 121 years ago, appears to be on a slide.

It has just announced that it is cutting 12,000 jobs from from its power unit, that's an 18% reduction, as renewables move into the market for its gas turbines.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/201...amps-power-unit

Yesterday I happened to read about how, at the beginning of the 20th century, the US adopted an "Open Door" policy with regard to China where it would not look to take possession of any Chinese territory but instead would require open access for its companies and missionaries. The comment was made that one of the companies pushing for this was Standard Oil, but not for it to see petroleum products for at the time its major product line was kerosene for lighting. At that time, petrol was a by-product of kerosene production and it took fairly agressive tactics for petrol to find a use in transportation. Of course Standard Oil went on to spawn ExxonMobil and Chevron Oil and made the Rockefeller family the richest family in the world. It looks like GE needs to reinvent itself or it will be consigned to the pages of history.



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 7 2017, 05:04 AM
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High electricity prices speed renewable push: Enzen
QUOTE
The chief executive of global energy strategic advisory company Enzen Group says high energy prices in Australia mean that companies are looking to adopt new technologies in renewable energy faster than other countries, which will in turn hasten the transformation of electricity grids.

Kutty Prabakaran, who heads the privately-owned company which generates $200 million-plus in revenues annually from operations in 10 countries, said there was no single solution that would result in power costs falling in Australia. But the complexities of the energy grids as renewable energy components were stitched into them in a large country with a relatively sparse population meant there were vast opportunities to be a role model for a transition to new energy technology.

"There has been a lot of influx of renewables into the grid," he said in Adelaide on Monday. "We are a knowledge factory".

Enzen on Monday officially opened its Australian headquarters in Adelaide and said there were a diverse range of solutions being sought by energy companies and their customers..
http://www.afr.com/business/energy/electri...20171106-gzftwi



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 6 2017, 11:30 AM
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Forget gas exports to save the east coast: WA can be Australia’s solar battery
Gareth Costa
Monday, 6 November 2017 11:05AM

QUOTE
If WA is to play a part in the “nation building” energy debate, and $5 billion is up for grabs, then instead of diverting exportable gas to the east coast, the Federal Government should consider using this State’s renewable-energy potential.

Natural gas is a valuable international commodity — just ask east coast energy users.

So why waste it domestically when this sun-baked country has the longitudinal spread to export two to three hours of cheap solar energy across the Nullarbor at peak times.

In the name of “objective” nation-building, Premier Mark McGowan should request that Federal Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg assess the viability of making WA a gigantic solar battery for the east coast.


QUOTE
But are the politicians willing too?
- probably not

read more - https://thewest.com.au/business/renewable-e...y-ng-b88644542z



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 22 2017, 01:12 PM
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I'm repeating myself



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


nipper
post Posted: Sep 22 2017, 01:12 PM
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Stored pumped hydro

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-21/p...530?pfmredir=sm

- General article, stating the obvious, that the Great Divide has the most sites and potential, but without any analysis or impact, such as allocation of scarce resources



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 23 2017, 01:28 PM
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AUGUST 23 2017 - 12:12PM

QUOTE
Renewable energy boost to power Victoria's four biggest regional cities
In a huge boost to Victoria's electricity supply, renewable energy companies will compete to supply Victoria with 650 megawatts of power – enough for the energy needs of every household in Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo and the Latrobe Valley.

The competitive "reverse auction" will be the biggest of its kind in Australia, as corporations tender for the contracts to power 389,000 households. This is expected to trigger investment of about $1.3 billion in renewable projects such as construction of wind and solar farms.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/energy/r...822-gy22gs.html



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 18 2017, 01:05 PM
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Interesting demonstration video from Solarstor - now called Port Augusta Graphite Energy - who are proposing to build a solar thermal project in Port Augusta, SA. Their technology uses high purity graphite - not sure if natural or synthetic/manufactured. One would assume, if the project goes ahead, they would make use of graphite from a number of graphite projects in the area?

QUOTE
The Solastor System consists of a variable number of modules depending on the size of the project. Each module consists of solar thermal receiver (STR) located on top of a 24 metre high tower surrounded by up to 100 heliostats (tracking mirrors).

Each STR contains an arrangement of heat exchangers embedded in 10 tonnes of high purity graphite. The graphite used to store the energy collected from the sun is held in an inert atmosphere inside a steel casing. This allows the receivers to operate at high temperatures of up to 800⁰C with low thermal emissivity to minimise thermal losses.

http://solastor.com.au/the-solar-system/solastor-video/

extract of The Australian article
QUOTE
Dr Hewson is chairman of Port August­a Graphite Energy (formerly Solarstor) and said his company’s project would seek to access some of the federal money.

Port Augusta Graphite Energy did not tender for the state government contract, as Dr Hewson said it was “encouraged” to make an unsolicited bid to the Premier, Jay Weatherill, and Energy Minister Tom Koutsantonis.

He said the project was viable and the company had already ­secured the land, contractors, operators and finance.

“We are ready to start by the end of the year,” Dr Hewson said.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/m...45d2b1c2f3bb4b9





--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 13 2017, 09:11 PM
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Cleantech stocks build momentum
By Victor Bivell

August 2017

extract
QUOTE
Renewable energy project developers

In my view, any company that does not pay a sustainable dividend is a speculative investment. There has never been a shortage of speculative stocks and this has now expanded to include speculative solar energy project developers.

This is a second area of growth on ASX, driven by the arrival of three solar energy project developers – Genex Energy, Carnegie Clean Energy and ReNu Energy.

Although the installation of residential solar energy systems has been strong around Australia for several years, there is still a lack of ASX exposure to the residential installation market. But the number of commercial solar projects and utility-scale solar farms has begun to grow, and these three companies now make it possible to invest in some of these local projects.

Genex Power is constructing a solar energy farm in northern Queensland in two stages, plus an adjacent pumped hydro dam to store the energy. This is a large project. Stage one is 50 MW and stage two 270 MW. The pumped hydro storage project will be 250 MW.

These have been given Critical Infrastructure Project status by the Queensland Government. Construction of stage one is underway and the first revenue is expected later this year.

Carnegie Clean Energy, the former Carnegie Wave Energy, continues to develop its first commercial-scale wave energy farm using its world-leading wave technology, but last year it acquired Energy Made Clean and expanded its product offering into remote-area solar energy and storage.

It also has solar project capacity through a joint venture with property developer Lendlease. The companies are developing a 10 MW solar power station at Northam, east of Perth, which is expected to begin operation by the end of 2017. Carnegie has other projects underway and solar energy and battery-based energy storage projects are now its main source of revenue.

Although ReNu Energy has an early-stage bioenergy business, it recently refocused on solar to drive short and medium-term revenue growth. The company has signed two agreements to help it build a portfolio of solar projects.

One was to buy a small commercial solar project at a school in the ACT, with more acquisitions possible. The second was with SCA Property Group to install, own and operate an initial 2.9 MW of solar projects at four regional shopping centres.

The company is working to expand its solar portfolio into areas such as retirement villages and office buildings, and it aims to become cashflow positive by next year.

An ASX wind energy option has long been available through Infigen Energy, which owns six wind farms. In April, the company raised $151 million to refinance debt and fund a new project, the 113 MW Bodangora wind farm at Wellington in NSW, where site works have begun. Infigen is capitalised at more than $700 million and has a deep development pipeline that includes wind and solar energy projects.

Supplying the battery revolution

A third area where ASX has a strong offering is in the emerging energy storage market. Suddenly, speculative battery hopefuls seem everywhere. These are mostly mining explorers that want to help supply the world with its growing future need for battery metals – lithium, cobalt, graphite and vanadium in particular.

Over the past two years this area has exploded and there are now far too many companies to mention. At my last count, there were at least 22 with potential cobalt projects and 14 with actual or potential graphite projects.

Lithium is similar and, having started earlier, a few companies recently became lithium producers, among them Orocobre, Galaxy Resources and Neometals. The first large-scale graphite producers are not far way. Cobalt production will take a little longer.

Hopefully over the next few years some of these companies will prosper into profitable and dividend-paying stocks.



http://www.asx.com.au/education/investor-u...50020AA3F0021B~



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
 


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