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Cyber security
nipper
post Posted: Aug 10 2020, 11:33 AM
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This sector has got to be in a bubble? Or is the market making up for neglecting cyber security.

compare the recent runs to what was said only a year ago:
https://www.nabtrade.com.au/investor/insigh...asx_listed_cybe
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Looking at the Australian stock market, though, you would not know that cyber security is a growth business. The ASX does host cyber security companies, but sadly, it is a desert in terms of investment success. Is this because of the technology offerings being lacking in some way, or the relative lack of specialist investors to pick up on the opportunities being presented, and give them some market support and impetus? That appears to be a big problem....

Here are four interesting candidates in the ASX-listed cyber-security world ... but be warned, all of these have severely tested investor patience.
goes to list AR9, TNT, WHK and SEN. Along with VOR, all are up 10 to 20% today. And have been booming for a month or so. With small Market Caps, there was probably no institutional presence on their registries until recently



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 8 2020, 03:36 PM
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The cyber strategy announced this week describes the problem we face :
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Nation-states and state-sponsored actors seek to compromise networks to obtain economic, policy, legal, defence and security information for their advantage. (They) may also seek to achieve disruptive or destructive effects against their targets during peacetime or in a conflict setting. These actors tend to be sophisticated, well-resourced and patient adversaries whose actions could impact Australia’s national security and economic prosperity.






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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 26 2020, 06:43 PM
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The hacking of 130 high-profile Twitter accounts on Wednesday 15 July is a reminder of the growing importance of cybersecurity in the new digital age. Verified accounts including Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Barack Obama were targeted and used to post a scam seeking to lure followers into sending Bitcoin to the perpetrators. The majority of companies that are more vulnerable than a US$28bn social networking giant need to take notice. Working from home may increase the likelihood of a cyber breach for many companies, as employees are often working with less than optimal software and using unsecured forms of communication. According to the PwC Global Economic Crime and Fraud Survey 2020, cybercrime is the second most frequent incident of fraud.

It is not just companies that are expected to increase spending in this area. On 30 June 2020, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a plan for the nations largest ever investment in cybersecurity; A$1.35bn and over 500 new jobs over the next decade to enhance the cyber security capabilities. The 2019 US President Budget included a US$15bn budget for cybersecurity-related activities.

BetaShares Global Cybersecurity ETF (HACK) provides exposure to a diversified portfolio of the largest leading and emerging cybersecurity companies in the world. HACK provides a simple and cost-effective method to gain exposure to the rapidly growing global cybersecurity sector.

For full details refer to the detailed report; click on the link to download your copy.
https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2020/07/23/bel...-cyber-attacks/

are companies primarily involved in the building, implementation and management of security protocols applied to private and public networks, computers, and mobile devices to provide protection of the integrity of data and network operations.

Investment approach
HACK seeks to achieve the investment objective by providing a full replication of the Index.
The index employs a modified liquidity weighted methodology. Liquidity is measured using the 3-month average daily dollar trading volume of each Index security as of the close of trading on the last trading day in February, May, August, and November. There must be a minimum liquidity of US$1m to be included in the Index. Eligible securities must also be listed as a cybersecurity company as determined by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) and have a minimum worldwide market capitalisation of US$250m.

Each quarter, the Index is rebalanced such that the maximum weight of any Index security does not exceed 6% and no more than 5 securities are at that cap. Next, any remaining Index securities more than 3% are capped at 3% and the excess weight is redistributed proportionally across the remaining securities.

Seems mainly USA focused: Top 10 holdings
CrowdStrike Holdings Inc 6.7%
Splunk Inc 6.3%
Broadcom Inc 6.3%
Okta Inc 6.1%
Cisco Systems Inc 5.6%
Cloudflare Inc 3.5%
Zscaler Inc 3.5%
Check Point Software Technology 3.2%
Akamai Technologies Inc 3.1%
CyberArk Software Ltd 3.1%



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: rlane  
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 24 2020, 11:50 AM
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Posts: 7,619
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 3 2020, 01:41 PM

Govt report out

https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/cyber-securi...-iap-report.pdf

we must do more!
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The 56-page report calls for increased government investment in the Joint Cyber Security Centre program. Federal agencies spend on average about 6 per cent of their ICT budget on security. Leading jurisdictions, such as Singapore and Israel, spend about 10 per cent.

The panel also said there was a clear need for a mechanism between industry and government for real-time sharing of threat information, beginning with critical infrastructure operators. The government should also empower industry to automatically detect and block a greater proportion of known cyber security threats in real time...




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 3 2020, 01:41 PM
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Do we rely solely on tech for cyber problems?
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Imagine this scenario: 90 per cent of traffic accidents are caused by speeding, so to address the issue all cars must be roadworthy and have airbags installed. Seems straight forward these are important measures.
But if we're saying that the major issue here is the behaviour of people, how do these initiatives address that?

And yet that is exactly what is happening with cyber security. There's a massive push to implement technical solutions for problems that are largely related to the behaviour of people.

2019 report by the UK Information Commissioner's Office found that 90 per cent of data breaches are via people.

Take a bit of unaware, unsuspicious, gullible, helpful and trusting, and lo and behold you have your standard person, ready to be tricked into letting an IT criminal onto your network. Now add to that the fact that we're working from home a lot more on systems that are largely out of the control of IT departments and we've got the perfect storm, ready to be taken advantage of by strategic cyber-criminal groups.

Despite this, SME's who make up most of the businesses in Australia and employ the most people, generally spend very little on cyber security, with half of SMEs spending less than $500 on cyber security in the last year.

Cybercrime is a popular and rapidly growing industry too. It's well resourced, easy to get into, and you can work from home. There's good money to be made, too. Not long ago it used to be a question of "if" you'd be breached. Now the unfortunate reality is about "how bad" and "how often".

So how did we find ourselves in this mess? If you talk to people about cyber security, the general perception is that it's a technical issue.

Most people think that technology like Firewalls and Antivirus will keep you safe at home; the government provides us with the "Essential 8", a framework specifying basic technical controls to secure your network; government grants were provided to help companies part-fund enhancements to technical security infrastructure; and IT criminals are largely portrayed as hooded "hackers" artistically injecting code to crack into a network using their malicious technology.

So yes, on the face of it this clearly looks like a technical problem, and spending $500 on technical solutions isn't going to get anyone very far. Even if a company did allocate some reasonable funds, they're still spending money on getting the road worthy and airbags, and not watching the speed signs!

The core of the issue is that 90 per cent figure. It is compelling. Yes, there are three aspects to IT security: People, processes and technology. But If we don't address all three areas then we have a weak point.

This is Risk Management 101. Identify the risks, determine their likelihood of occurring and impact, give them a rating, prioritise them, and then address them in order.

So how do we address this focus issue? How are we supposed to win the battle against cyber criminals when we have one hand tied behind our back? A great start would be if messaging from government started to support a more balanced perspective.

That could start with taking the technically focused "Essential 8", and bolstering it with a people-centric section to become the "Essential 9".

This new content could focus on the ABC's of cyber security: Awareness, Behaviour & Culture. That is, make people aware of how they are being targeted, motivate them to change their behaviour, and embed cyber security awareness into the culture of the organisation.

It's really not hard to train your staff and then keep them on their toes by drip feeding short snippets of engaging and relevant cyber security content!

This can then flow into industry compliance frameworks, government resources for business that highlight relative cyber security risks, and it can be a reoccurring topic when communicating with businesses and the public about cyber security risks.

A great example is the June increase in malicious activity against political and private sector organisations by a sophisticated state-based actor. In a breach it was reported an attacker gained access to systems by targeting people after failing to gain access through technical means. This provided the perfect opportunity to talk about cyber security awareness initiatives as opposed to the usual technical solutions narrative.

As companies start to embrace a culture of cyber security awareness they will naturally gravitate towards more technical controls, hopefully driven by a realisation of the cost benefits that come from breach reductions.

Remember the saying "culture eats strategy for breakfast"? Well cyber security culture will feast on IT criminal strategy if it's done well, and the Government has a great opportunity to drive this change now.

Mike Ouwerkerk

https://www.innovationaus.com/do-we-rely-solely-on-tech-for-cyber-problems/




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: henrietta  
 
 



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