Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

52 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > »    
 
  
Reply to this topic

Iron Ore, The Iron Ore Industry
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 12 2019, 01:45 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Nov 12 2019, 10:39 AM

The IO price roller coaster continues

QUOTE
Iron ore futures looking perky
Iron ore futures are soaring in Asia, pointing to the likelihood of a rebound in spot markets after prices slumped to fresh 9-month lows on Monday.

The January 2020 contract on the Dalian Commodities Exchange has jumped to ¥607.5 a tonne ($US86.70), up 2.5 per cent for the session. Iron ore futures in Singapore have gained a larger 3.5 per cent to $US79.21 a tonne.

The gains coincide with similar strength in Chinese steel futures in Shanghai on Tuesday. Rebar and hot-rolled coil contracts for January delivery have risen 1.8 and 1.4 per cent respectively for the session.




--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 12 2019, 10:39 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Oct 26 2019, 01:51 PM

Iron ore prices at 9-month low
By David Scutt
QUOTE
Iron ore prices continued to slide on Monday with all major grades hitting fresh 9-month lows, according to data from Fastmarkets MB, continuing the steep reversal from multi-year peaks struck earlier in the year. This has sent the materials sector down 0.9 per cent, the worst performer on the market this morning. BHP is down 1.2 per cent to $36.72, Fortescue is down 3.5 per cent to $8.73, and South32 is down 2.2 per cent to $2.69.

The spot price for benchmark 62 per cent iron ore fines fell 1.4 per cent to $US78.98 a tonne, leaving it at the lowest level since late January. 58 per cent fines fell by a similar margin while 65 per cent Brazilian fines slipped by a smaller 1 per cent. Vivek Dhar, mining and energy commodities analyst at the Commonwealth Bank, put the recent weakness down to weak demand in China.

“Steel mills in China and traders were reluctant to buy iron ore ahead of announcements on winter production cuts,” he told the bank’s clients on Monday. “Winter production cuts usually extend from mid November to mid March as policymakers look to reduce industrial output in northern China to combat seasonally higher air pollution.”

While analysts at Westpac Bank don’t expect the recent weakness to last, forecasting the benchmark iron ore price will finish this year at $US90 a tonne, it’s less optimistic about the longer-term outlook, predicting the benchmark will ease to $US65 a tonne by the end of 2020 as increased supply and softer Chinese demand collide.

“We expect prices to continue to decline in 2020 as supply recovers post Brazilian disasters, while demand subsides as Chinese property investment moderates,” Westpac senior economist Justin Smirk told clients. “Environmental goals are also seeing improved Chinese steel production efficiency and the higher use of scrap [steel].”

Thanks to a combination of supply disruptions from Australia and Brazil, most notably from the latter as a failure at a tailings dam at an iron ore facility operated by Vale in late January curtailed production on safety grounds, along with record Chinese steel production, prices for all major iron ore grades soared to fresh five-year highs earlier this year.

With evidence building that Brazilian supply is recovering, as seen in recent trade and Chinese iron ore port inventory data, much of the price spike has now been entirely unwound.




--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 26 2019, 01:51 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


BHP and Vale’s Samarco licensed to restart operations
QUOTE
Samarco Mineração, a joint venture between Vale and BHP received on Friday its Corrective Operation License (LOC) for its operating activities in the Germano Complex, located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

The license was approved by the Mining Activities Chamber (CMI) of the State Council for Environmental Policy (COPAM). Samarco has now obtained all environmental licenses required to restart its operations.

The news comes four years after a tailings dam burst at Germano in November 2015, killing 19. A torrent of mud and debris was unleashed, polluting local rivers and reaching the Atlantic ocean. The incident has been called the worst environmental disaster in Brazil’s history.

Vale has previously said that it expected production at the joint venture, which is trying to restructure $3.8 billion in debt it defaulted on about a year after the accident, to resume in the second half of 2020.

The mine, which once produced nearly 25 million tonnes of iron ore a year, will restart at an annual rate of less than a third of that, Vale said, with a potential increase to 14 to 16 million within another six years.

(With files from Reuters)

https://www.mining.com/bhp-and-vales-samarc...art-operations/



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 25 2019, 10:39 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


There’s No Shortage of Iron Ore — There’s a Shortage of it at the Right Cost
extract
QUOTE
But documents filed with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission last week show two Sinosteel subsidiaries are the buyers, the article reports. The documents suggest the two subsidiaries paid the just $3 each for their respective 50% stakes in Oakajee Port and Rail, the company that owns the studies and intellectual property for the Oakajee railway network and deep-water port.

One of the Sinosteel subsidiaries was also said to have been transferred all shares in Crosslands Resources, the company that holds the nearby Jack Hills iron ore project. Crosslands is reliant on Oakajee Port and Rail building the port and rail infrastructure to get its product economically to market; so, without the port, the assets is essentially a dead duck.

Maybe not surprisingly, ASIC documents say Crosslands was sold for nothing.

On the face of it, it’s a huge loss for Mitsubishi, which had spent hundreds of millions buying into the related projects and investing in Jack Hills. Meanwhile, it’s a zero cost gain for Sinosteel, but it now leaves the Chinese with the need to invest the best part of A$10 billion to develop the port, rail infrastructure and mines.

https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/theres...the-right-cost/



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 17 2019, 09:56 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


Iron ore
QUOTE
Undermined by signs of a recovery in seaborne supply and news of stricter industrial curbs in northern Chinese regions during winter, iron ore prices were hit hard on Wednesday with all major grades tumbling more than 5 per cent.


David Scutt @Scutty
Replying to @Scutty
Iron ore. Oof.

MBIOI-5.5% to $87.86, the lowest level since Aug 30. Similar declines across lower and higher grades. Dalian iron ore skidded to ¥611.5 o/n.
Attached Image



“Rio Tinto reported a 5 per cent rise in production for the September quarter to 86.1 million tonnes. This follows on from Vale earlier in the week, who reported a 35 per cent jump in Q3 output as it brought back closed mines following the deadly dam disaster earlier this year,” said ANZ Bank’s senior commodity strategist Daniel Hynes in a note.

Separately, Tangshan, China's top steelmaking city, issued a second-level smog alert requiring steel mills to further limit operations, according to Reuters.

https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/mar...017-p531ho.html



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 4 2019, 10:00 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,325
Thanks: 2229


In Reply To: early birds's post @ Sep 4 2019, 09:54 PM

If you can have swing producers, then the Chinese are swing consumers. A tap that is adjusted frequently, manipulated some might say.

- I'm surprised pricing held up for so long!



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

sentifi.com

Share Cafe Sentifi Top themes and market attention on:


early birds
post Posted: Sep 4 2019, 09:54 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 12,466
Thanks: 1372


In Reply To: nipper's post @ Sep 4 2019, 11:03 AM

The drop deepened amid sluggishness among the Chinese mills responsible for producing more than half the world’s steel, and concerns over future demand
=================

world's steel production has been about 30% over supplied every year for many years by now. as housing boom nearly ended around world-----hmmm!!! have to reduce steel production i guess.
we see the ore price diving even without vale on line. am not bullish on ore going forward.





Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 4 2019, 12:23 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


In Reply To: nipper's post @ Sep 4 2019, 11:03 AM

Up and down like a yoyo biggrin.gif



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 4 2019, 11:03 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,325
Thanks: 2229


QUOTE
Iron-ore prices posted their biggest one-month fall in almost eight years as China’s huge steel engine cools and global shipments of the commodity rise.

The price fell 27 per cent to $US85.85 a tonne by the end of August, the most since October 2011, according to S&P Global Platts.

The collapse was triggered by global trade tensions after US President Donald Trump threatened to impose new tariffs on Chinese goods, some of which went into effect Sunday. The drop deepened amid sluggishness among the Chinese mills responsible for producing more than half the world’s steel, and concerns over future demand.


- billions lost! I'll send out a search party



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 3 2019, 10:43 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 6,603
Thanks: 2266


Iron ore prices surge
QUOTE
Speculation over increased infrastructure spending in China sent iron ore prices hurtling higher to start the week.

The spot price for benchmark 62 per cent fines jumped 7 per cent to $US90.58 a tonne, according to Fastmarkets MB, extending the rebound over the past two sessions to 11.2 per cent. Higher and lower iron ore grades also saw prices surge by 5.4 per cent or more for the session.

“China’s State Council reiterated its support for the domestic economy,” ANZ Bank senior commodity strategist Daniel Hynes said in a note to clients. “Among the points of focus, the country will look heavily at infrastructure projects.”

Vivek Dhar, mining and commodities analyst at the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, that along with speculation over infrastructure investment, the enormous gains may have been helped by low supplies of iron ore at Chinese steel mills.

https://www.theage.com.au/business/markets/...903-p52ncy.html



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington

Said 'Thanks' for this post: lgrif  
 
 


52 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 4 > » 

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING