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Climate, Earth's Climate
alonso
post Posted: Nov 11 2019, 10:34 AM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Nov 10 2019, 05:50 PM

"My personal view is that the Earth's climate is always changing, to warmer or cooler, and it's extremely vain of humans to think that they can do much about it."

This has always been my view on this issue too, especially the second part of the sentence. I liked what this bloke had to say about it all:

https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/20..._about_co2.html






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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 
henrietta
post Posted: Nov 10 2019, 05:50 PM
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My personal view is that the Earth's climate is always changing, to warmer or cooler, and it's extremely vain of humans to think that they can do much about it. Every tiny bit of "evidence" of "global warming" is leapt upon by the activists to show that they are right, but any research numbers showing cooling or ice increasing is conveniently ignored. I'm fairly sure that between about 2000 and 2015 temperatures were pretty stable and ice caps actually increased. Since then temperatures have increased a bit and ice has retreated, the usual ebb and flow of temperatures and weather.

The global hysteria from all walks of life is just incomprehensible. I can understand politicians wanting to be seen to be concerned and "doing something", but to hear leaders of large corporations jumping on the bandwagon is mystifying and disturbing. Are they that worried about loud people at the AGM's ?

To my thinking the world has gone mad in this headlong race to be seen to be "concerned, and doing something about it". In my more cynical moments I wonder if there's some evil plan to de-rail all western democracies by getting them to bankrupt themselves wasting money chasing impossible "targets", instead of steadily improving the lives of their citizens.

Perhaps I'm 100% wrong and we are indeed on the road to destruction of the Earth ............. but I think we are rather foolish to think that we can make massive changes to the Earth's climate / weather. At the moment, every change in weather sees more headlines about global disaster, rather than a more circumspect report of " we're in for a few hot days".

If I'm hit by lightning tonight, you'll know that I got it badly wrong !! biggrin.gif

Cheers
J


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tombeet
post Posted: Nov 10 2019, 03:20 PM
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In Reply To: tombeet's post @ Nov 10 2019, 02:44 PM

Just got back from N.Z. north island the rivers are flowing, waterfalls everwhere it's all very green and pristine. Got back to Aus and wow it's like a dust bowl.

 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 10 2019, 03:16 PM
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In Reply To: tombeet's post @ Nov 10 2019, 02:44 PM

more data and horror fodder for you, @tombeet
the bulk of posts are extracts from scientists or peer review studies, so they can tend to be reductionist and require some context, although, in toto,they all carry similar messages or insights


https://sites.uci.edu/zlabe/arctic-sea-ice-extentconcentration/
Zack Labe is worth following for ice/heat maps


Attached File  chuckchi_ice.jpg ( 317.04K ) Number of downloads: 5





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tombeet
post Posted: Nov 10 2019, 02:44 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Nov 9 2019, 01:21 PM

Enjoying your posts Joules we need to updated on whats happening in the changing world now.




Cheers
Tom.

 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 9 2019, 01:21 PM
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https://weather.com/en-IN/india/science/new...l-warming-study

Red Deer are Evolving Within Decades to Adapt to Global Warming: Study

The Weather Channel IndiaVerified account @weatherindia November 7, 2019

Red deer on the Isle of Rum in Scotland
are displaying one of the first evidences of wild animals evolving by altering their birthing patterns in order to adapt to global warming. And this evolution is happening in decades, not centuries! " In the new research published this week, a team of scientists, led by Dr Timothée Bonnet of the Australian National University, has “documented evolution in action” using field records and collecting genetic data on rum deer over a 45-year period, dating back to 1972. "
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" Red deer on the Isle of Rum in Scotland are displaying one of the first evidences of wild animals evolving by altering their birthing patterns in order to adapt to global warming. And this evolution is happening in decades, not centuries!

Charles Darwin believed that evolution is a slow and gradual process. And until 1972, when Stephen Jay Gould proposed the theory of Punctuated Equilibrium, this was true for the scientific community. As per Jay’s theory, species stayed structurally similar for millions of years, followed by rapid bursts of change that result in a new species. However, both the models of evolution showed that it takes hundreds and thousands of years for organisms to develop different characteristics.

However, the shift in the red deer’s birthing pattern is one of the very rare instances of evolution occurring in nature over such a short period of time�"that too because of anthropocentric warming acting as the environmental trigger. "

" The shift in birth timings is down to the effects of warmer temperatures on the deer’s behaviour and physiology. Now, researchers hope that this new adaptation may very well help the red deer population thrive as the climate continues to warm. "

Attached File  EIv3QFvUUAEiLdt.jpg ( 145.2K ) Number of downloads: 0



" Previous studies have shown that since the 1980s, red deer repeatedly began giving birth to their young ones earlier than normal. Data shows this date has been shifting backwards at a rate of about three days per decade.

In the new research published this week, a team of scientists, led by Dr Timothée Bonnet of the Australian National University, has “documented evolution in action” using field records and collecting genetic data on rum deer over a 45-year period, dating back to 1972.

In this study, the researchers observed that the deer that give birth earlier in the year experience more reproductive success. Female red deer, called hinds, are known to give birth to a single calf each year. However, those that give birth earlier in the year produce more calves over their lifetime compared to the hinds that give birth during the latter stages of the year.

Subsequently, as the deer that give birth early have multiplied faster, the gene that causes birth earlier has become much more common among the rum deer population over the past few decades�"in line with the natural selection process from Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution. "


The study is published in the journal PLOS Biology.



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joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 9 2019, 12:54 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Oct 1 2018, 04:55 PM

a follow-up Q&A for the post this post is replying to
Q
@matsfreedom
2 weeks ago
" Since CO2 is the issue, what percentage is optimal? How little is too little? How much is too much? Is 0.04% the ideal amount for life on Earth? Without this understanding, the arguments regarding its presence in the atmosphere are incomplete, if not utterly pointless. Perhaps more is better. Perhaps a lot more is better. Perhaps less is disastrous. So, how much is just right? In addition, the current narrative is that we're all going to be dead or under water in 12 years, so why isn't the West fighting China and India with bombs and missiles to force them to comply with net zero emissions guidelines? How much of our atmosphere will be polluted with CO2, causing world wide, mass extinctions? If it's going to kill all of us, certainly the "scientific community" "
A
potholer54 2 weeks ago " @matsfreedom wrote: "Since CO2 is the issue, what percentage is optimal?" Nature doesn't care, it is whatever it is, whether the Earth is frozen over or in a hothouse. The issue is what matters for the global economy. Our civilization and our modern economy grew out of the temperature and sea level and ice quantity we have. Radically changing that will mean a hugely expensive change of economic structure. "



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price

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joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 9 2019, 12:46 PM
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and next flying climate airways we have the US Federal Reserve...if this is fanaticism theyre going all in.....

EnvironmentNovember 9, 2019 / 3:52 AM / Updated 6 hours ago<h1 class="ArticleHeader_headline">Fed sees climate change shaping economy, policy</h1>
SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - The U.S. central bank signaled on Friday it may be getting ready to join international peers in incorporating climate change risk into its assessments of financial stability, and may even take it into account when setting monetary policy.

“To fulfill our core responsibilities, it will be important for the Federal Reserve to study the implications of climate change for the economy and the financial system and to adapt our work accordingly,” Fed Governor Lael Brainard said in remarks released at the start of the Fed’s first-ever conference on climate change and economics.

The Fed, she said, will need to look at how to keep banks and the financial system resilient amid risks from extreme weather, higher temperatures, rising sea levels and other effects of the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

And increasingly, she said, “it will be important for the Federal Reserve to take into account the effects of climate change and associated policies in setting monetary policy to achieve our objectives of maximum employment and price stability.”

Brainard’s comments mark a shift for the Fed, which lags other major central banks that have made climate change an explicit part of their financial stability remits. Her talk, the first she’s given in her five-year tenure at the Fed that even mentions the subject, suggests she and her colleagues are taking the risks and costs of global warming seriously.

The U.S. central bank’s attention to global warming comes even as President Donald Trump’s administration denies it exists. Trump on Monday notified the United Nations that the United States will in 12 months leave the Paris Climate Accord, under which 195 nations agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a bid to prevent catastrophic planetary warming.

Scientists are in broad agreement that carbon dioxide from cars, power plants and other human sources are behind the climate change that’s already making powerful hurricanes, severe drought, and other weather extremes more frequent.






RISING RISKS, SLOWING ECONOMIES
The San Francisco Fed’s conference, so oversubscribed that a webcast has been created to meet demand, gave policymakers a crash course in research that could change how the Fed forecasts economic growth, regulates banks, and even sets interest rates.

Papers presented at the conference showed how climate change has crimped growth and presented ideas on how policy, including monetary policy, can be used to mitigate harm.

University of Southern California professor Hashem Pesaran showed that rising average temperatures and volatile precipitation - both effects of climate change - have already slowed U.S. economic output in recent decades.

Meeting Paris Accord goals, the paper found, could limit losses to per capita U.S. GDP from planetary warming over the next 80 years to 3% or less, versus 14% if goals are not met.

Swedish central bank economist Conny Olovsson used an economic model to show losses to economic growth from imposing a carbon tax - an objection often raised by politicians and industry - would be dwarfed by the economic losses projected if carbon dioxide remains largely untaxed and global warming continues unchecked.

In a third paper, Nicholas Muller, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, outlined how the Fed might factor environmental circumstances into monetary policy by, for example, keeping rates lower when pollution levels were increasing, to encourage consumption before they got worse, and higher when pollution was declining, to depress spending until the environment improved.





ed policymakers appeared receptive to the ideas.

“Climate change is an issue we can’t afford to ignore,” San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly said at the start of the conference, a day that also marked the one-year anniversary of a fire 150 miles north of San Francisco that killed 85 people and destroyed 14,000 homes, a conflagration blamed in part on climate change. “This is not a hypothetical risk of the future...the risks are here, we have to deal with them.”

Reporting by Ann Saphir and Lindsay Dunsmuir; Additional reporting by Jonnelle Marte in New York; Editing by Andrea Ricci




https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fed-..._source=twitter






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Pendragon
post Posted: Nov 8 2019, 06:46 PM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Nov 6 2019, 08:45 PM

So it is no longer about Climate Change per se - but an index of livability.

Climate change is going to be rolled into a livability index measuring not only temperature change, but the number of people on earth, the amount of forests we clear, the amount of meat we eat etc etc.

One thing about these climate change loonies, they are flexible. If they are losing one argument they throw in another parameter.
(they sound like my wife- can never win an argument with her.)



 
joules mm1
post Posted: Nov 8 2019, 04:12 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Nov 8 2019, 03:14 PM

https://youtu.be/CcmCBetoR18
a decent enough video to give an insight on how, at least, that non-scientific examples are but rebuttles alone and not much more
..not to put too finer point on "it"




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