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RMD, RESMED INC
cooderman
post Posted: Mar 13 2020, 02:47 PM
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RMD fell to October 2019 breakout point today.

Low of 20.08. Nice bounce late in day.


 
bg99
post Posted: Feb 1 2020, 08:09 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 31 2020, 08:59 PM

Yes sleep apnea is a growing business for sure, just be aware they have significant competition... I have a Phillips machine and love it as do others I know..... also RMD is on a PE of 62x !


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nipper
post Posted: Jan 31 2020, 08:59 PM
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QUOTE
ResMed is anticipating an "unreserved goodness" to the business following the expansion of the likes of Apple, Fitbit and Google into software that can measure sleep disturbances.

Speaking to The Australian Financial Review after the company's second quarter results, ResMed chief executive Mick Farrell said its biggest competitor was a lack of awareness of the seriousness of sleep apnoea, which he said should be termed sleep suffocation.

He said awareness should be improved immensely by the spread of new devices, which can alert users to potential conditions, such as sleep apnoea or asthma, that could be affecting their ability to sleep peacefully.

"Prevalence data suggests that 936 million people worldwide suffer from sleep suffocation every night. We have under 5 per cent penetrated," he said. "Our biggest competitor is the lack of awareness and our goal is to drive that awareness through doctors and individuals ..."

- Resmed probably more a tech and software company these days? My partner uses a CPAP; had an issue with her new(ish) machine and rang them up. 'Yes, we can see the issue', and talked it through.

I used to be somewhat sceptical about the approach, but the data gather is impressive. Also, the cost of spare parts!!

Good business .
QUOTE
The medtech company grew revenue by 13 per cent (14 per cent on a constant currency basis) to $US736.2 million ($1.09 billion) for the second quarter.

Its net income jumped 29 per cent to $US160.6 million across the same period. For the first six months of the year, ResMed recorded net income of $US280.7 million, up 22 per cent.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jan 24 2020, 07:28 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 29 2019, 11:38 AM

NAB are pushing the idea that Apple might add RESMED to their table of health related stocks.

FROM NABTRADE


QUOTE
Sleep apnea, CPAP, oxygen therapy: these are not Apple-associated words. Yet over the past few months, we've found it difficult to shake a heretical thought: why wouldn't Apple want to buy ResMed?

For the past five years or so, ResMed has been building what it describes as a 'connected care ecosystem' to make its respiratory devices more useful to patients and healthcare providers.


Key Points
Apple pushing into health monitoring
ResMed's patient and clinic data attractive
Rapidly growing, large market
The company has spent nearly US$2.0bn on acquisitions that strengthen its software, data management and analytics capabilities. It's this basket of connected digital services - and their piles of consumer healthcare data - that we think could soon put ResMed in Apple's sights, if it isn't already.

It's worth understanding these units a little better before we explain why 2020 could see a big deal.


The golden four
In 2014, ResMed introduced a cloud-based software platform called 'Air Solutions', similar to the Apple interface that seamlessly links your Apple products behind the scenes.

The major selling point was the 'AirView Monitoring and Compliance Management System' which enables doctors to wirelessly monitor how and when a patient uses their machine, collect diagnostic and therapy information, and - somewhat creepily for the technophobes - 'monitor and change your patients' device settings remotely without having to leave your desk.'

In 2016, ResMed went all in on this strategy, buying US-based software maker Brightree for US$800m so that it could integrate billing, patient resupply, procurement and business analytics into its system.
So why Apple? And why now?

ResMed's market cap of US$22bn would normally make it too large for any company to buy. If Apple did buy it, it would be the largest transaction in Australian history, assuming Apple would need to pay a 15-30% premium for shareholders to bite.

Still, with US$100bn of cash sitting on Apple's balance sheet, the company would have no trouble making an offer. More importantly, ResMed could be worth a lot more in Apple's hands than as either a standalone company or in the hands of a competitor.

Since the launch of the Apple Watch a few years back, Apple has continuously added tools to help consumers monitor and manage their health. From the Apple Watch's new heart monitoring and ECG functions, to support for hearing aids, women's health and medication reminders, Apple clearly sees health monitoring and management as a key part of its future.

On the face of it, sleep apnea may sound too niche for Apple but it's a condition with a huge pool of undiagnosed patients. Sleep apnea affects over 900 million people worldwide, while asthma affects a further 150 million. Some 80% of those are undiagnosed. Of the billion people who own an Apple product, roughly 100 million or so are likely to have either sleep apnea or asthma.

Furthermore, three recent acquisitions suggest Apple already has its eyes on the segment. In 2016, the company acquired Gliimpse, which allows patients to store and share healthcare records. In 2017, it bought Beddit, which makes sleep sensors and sleep monitoring software. And in 2019, it bought Tueo, which makes under-the-mattress sensors to detect asthma.

If Apple continues to push into health monitoring - particularly sleep medicine, respiratory disorders, and asthma - we're hard pressed thinking of a better acquisition than ResMed. ResMed would significantly bolster Apple's intellectual property in those areas, and it would put Apple at the heart of the doctor's office too, allowing it to control the flow of data from the first beep of a monitoring sensor to record management, referrals and treatment.

Trying to put a precise figure on what all that is worth to Apple would be an empty exercise. Tech acquisitions tend to be valued far more on strategic hopes than on current earnings.

Nonetheless, with the CPAP device market growing at 11% a year and Brightree's revenue growing at twice that rate, we think ResMed could have US$600m or more in net profit a few years from now, up from US$419m today. ResMed's forward price-earnings ratio of 38 looks steep, but for a business of this quality with that sort of income and growth rate, we think it's justified.


I think I would want something a little more compelling than that spiel.
On a PE of over 50, it seems a little overpriced.


Mick



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nipper
post Posted: Jul 29 2019, 11:38 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 4 2018, 09:40 PM

ResMed raised to Buy, price target raised 15pc to US$140 — UBS..
...... must be the CDI, cos RMD locally has moved through $A18 a share. Not shabby, and seems to have moved upward for the last decade without too much fuss, keeping above 200dma all the time. Declining volume, though

Resmed is a tech success story (almost). The exploration of COPD is a second string to their bow



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 4 2018, 09:40 PM
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QUOTE
Resmed chief executive Mick Farrell says the acquisition of an innovative start-up that helps sufferers of asthma and other respiratory diseases allows the medical device maker to extend its growing software push into the lucrative area of pharmaceuticals for the first time.

The company spent $US225 million ($305 million) on the Wisconsin-based Propeller Health, which produces small sensors for inhalers that pair with software to provide analytics and medication alerts for people with respiratory conditions.

Mr Farrell said medical devices, on which ResMed has built its $22 billion business, accounted for just 20 per cent of healthcare expenditure. "We have a pretty good share of that 20 per cent and this will get us into the other 80 per cent," he said.....

Mr Farrell said that though Propeller's hardware was important, the value of the business was in the software. By using an intuitive consumer-facing app that draws upon data analytics, patients using Propeller's technology improved their adherence to treatment regimes by 58 per cent, he said.

Asked whether ResMed would make further acquisitions in pharmaceuticals, Mr Farrell said there were no immediate plans. "I never say never, but this one made a whole lot of sense," he said.

The acquisition expands ResMed's exposure to sufferers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some patients who suffer severely use ResMed's ventilation machines, as compared to those with lower severity levels who just use an inhaler. Propeller will also introduce ResMed to asthma sufferers for the first time....

Cloud-based medical technology, while unlocking new possibilities for connectivity and digital analytics, creates distinctive challenges around data privacy.

"We now have 3 billion nights worth of medical data," Mr Farrell said of data collected from users of ResMed's web-connected sleep therapy devices.

He estimated that ResMed had two or three times the volume of data on sleep apnoea and COPD as his competitors. "We believe in making sure we're highly vigilant, and that we have a good response if something were to happen," he said.

But Mr Farrell said that a commitment to cyber-security was not antithetical to growing apace. "It's not going to stop us from doing great innovation," he said.

Propeller was a known quantity to ResMed, which had taken out a minority stake in the smaller company. Mr Farrell had personally spent time with Propeller's team at its headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin. ResMed said they sought to maintain a balance between external acquisitions and internal research and development.

"You could do anything if you had enough time and money," Mr Farrell said. "This company had really made something innovative in something we're not in: a digital health platform for pharmaceuticals."

Once the acquisition is finalised in March 2019, Propeller will operate as a standalone business within ResMed's Respiratory Care portfolio.

Asked about the autonomy afforded to Propeller, Mr Farrell said the strategic and cultural fit between the two companies was key to his decision. "I don't want to slow them down," he said.

While Mr Farrell said the acquisition was a sound business decision, he also drew a more personal connection. Mr Farrell's father Peter established ResMed in 1989 "with a bit of angel funding and brought the technology out of the University of Sydney," he said. "Propeller is in a very similar place to where we were 25 years ago: they're an innovative start-up."
https://www.afr.com/business/health/resmed-...20181204-h18pqi





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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

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nipper
post Posted: Jan 30 2017, 02:33 PM
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QUOTE
RMD reported continued growth in sales of their airflow generator ("flow-gen") machines, however it exceeded expectations on mask sales.

RMD's new mask was launched only late in the quarter and had not been expected to make a meaningful contribution this early.

This bodes well given that masks remain their highest-margin product.

At the same time, the market's fears regarding price deterioration as a result of Medicare collective bidding in the US have not come to pass, potentially removing what has become a significant overhang for the stock in recent years.
BT




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 5 2017, 02:35 PM
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ResMed has hit a new milestone after one billion nights of sleep data was downloaded using its remote patient monitoring platform, AirView.

ResMed chief executive Mick Farrell said reaching one billion nights was about more than just big data.

“It is a testament to how the adoption and meaningful use of technology benefits patients, physicians and providers everywhere and we couldn’t be more pleased to start 2017 with this exciting news – this is just the beginning,” he said.

“This unprecedented amount of data enables predictive analytics to help physicians and providers better manage patients’ sleep apnoea and COPD therapy and ultimately improve their overall health.”

ResMed first enabled physicians and sleep specialists to remotely monitor sleep apnoea patients in 2004 and since then the data has helped doctors quickly identify which patients were experiencing therapy issues.

The Australian

.... So, which is worth more; the devices or the data?



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 27 2015, 10:46 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Apr 24 2015, 01:07 PM


Courtesy of Ord Minett

QUOTE
Resmed (RMD) posted a net profit $91 m, up 1% but missed our forecasts by 7%.
The miss was due in part to gross margin (GM) weakness and foreign exchange,
which we expect will reverse in 3-6 months. It also offset an extraordinary validation
of RMD’s latest Flow Generator (FG) platforms that posted 42% growth in the US.
Momentum is clearly building at the top line as more recent launches (Aircurve and
Astral) ramp up and especially if the Serve HF data is as compelling as it sounds for
ventilator use amongst cardio/respiratory patients. With strong top line potential and
a GM that should correct, we maintain our Accumulate recommendation &
upgrade price target to $9.70 despite a mask segment that is struggling to
rebound.

Will hold until something else comes along that offers better.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 24 2015, 01:07 PM
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In Reply To: promnian's post @ Apr 24 2015, 12:50 PM

Quarterly earnings released yesterday. Obviously market expected a lot better. Eps up only 2%
Revenue up 6% but gross margins were down, partially due to currency, partially due to price pressures.
Didnz't think ut was wort an 8% haircut.
Will wait for analysts views.
Mick




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