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"English as she is spoke", Our language and its quirks
joules mm1
post Posted: Feb 2 2020, 09:51 AM
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from the did you know file .....&c

https://twitter.com/i/moments/1223621086635491329



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
henrietta
post Posted: Jan 1 2020, 09:31 AM
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QUOTE
Pedestrians cross a bridge by foot as smoke haze settles over the town of Batesman Bay


As distinct from the pedestrians who were riding buses. Sigh wacko.gif

And I just noticed the Bateman's Bay !!?? So many stories to type, and so little time .....

Cheers
J

 
henrietta
post Posted: Dec 31 2019, 02:06 PM
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QUOTE
Her and her mother were on Tuesday trying to return to their pub and open it up for the community.


Fair dinkum, it just gets worse and worse, and this in The Australian.

Maybe things will improve in 2020 ......... Happy New Year everyone.

Cheers
J

 
alonso
post Posted: Dec 18 2019, 02:54 PM
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Contrary to popular belief, as encouraged by various media, the Apostrophe Protection Society is NOT closing down, but its website

is closing for a while for upgrading due to an increase in demand.

I don't think I'm pedantic and I fully appreciate that English is a living language. But change must always be monitored to ensure that

customary usage does not become an excuse for reducing either the richness of the language or its potential for precise expression of thought.

The preciseness of English is a marvellous thing and the correct use of the apostrophe is just one of a wide range of tools which go to ensure that

preciseness.






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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  mullokintyre  henrietta  Pendragon  
 
henrietta
post Posted: Dec 17 2019, 06:56 AM
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New book ........ maybe a Christmas present ??

"Death of a Typographer", by Nick Gadd.

QUOTE
Nick Gadd's second novel, Death of a Typographer, is both a celebration and a gentle satire of typography. With in-jokes scattered joyfully about, it's easy to be drawn into its ''typomania'' and Gadd delivers a novel that combines detective mystery and letterform aesthetics.


and

QUOTE
a romp of a novel. It's witty and playful quasi-detective fiction that's populated by a motley crew of obsessives who swoon or grimace at particular letterforms. Gadd's endearingly oddball characters ride on a narrative full of typographical jokes and exotic locations.

Cheers
J

 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 3 2019, 09:41 AM
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All too hard

(You beat me to it)



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

sentifi.com

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alonso
post Posted: Dec 3 2019, 08:34 AM
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A life too short perhaps but its' good to know when to quit:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-02/apos...chards/11756830






--------------------
"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 2 2019, 08:42 AM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Dec 2 2019, 07:37 AM

Gramma is fuh nerds.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
henrietta
post Posted: Dec 2 2019, 07:37 AM
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QUOTE
ABC boss David Anderson candidly told The Australian back in October: “We’re facing an ABC of the future that has less people.”


Wouldn't you think that the boss of the ABC would know when to use "fewer" and "less" ?

Guess not.

Cheers
J

 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 3 2019, 03:19 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Aug 3 2019, 02:34 PM

.... Barnard writes in the book’s introduction,
QUOTE
“The language of the convicts endures. Words such as seedy, serve, snitch, snooze, square and stash are now commonplace. Slang contributed to the shaping of an Australian identity: danna, meaning human excrement, gave way to dunny. Togs became ‘swimming costume’. Ridge — gold—became ridgy didge — ‘genuine, good’. Larking probably became ‘larrikin’. Swag is the origin of ‘swagman’. And grog still means grog.’’

The dictionary offers insights into the rich idiom and lives of Australia-bound convicts. Under the entry for “bashed”, we learn that while a convict wife could ask to be removed from an abusive husband, a free married woman was denied such protection.

That officials and magistrates could not understand convicts’ slang reflected the colonies’ rigid class divisions. “The irony,’’ says Barnard, “is the slang is highly imaginative. It’s not indicative of a lower intelligence. It’s painfully funny and clever.’’

But it’s not all irreverent half-puns and sly banter. Some entries allude to the penal system’s undeniable brutalities. “Twisted’’, for example, is a reference to hanged prisoners who slowly twisted to death when the noose caught them under the chin.

This horrific scenario was “quite common’’ in Australia during the transportation era, says Barnard. The longest-serving British executioner was a Tasmanian convict who “hanged all of his victims at the same length, regardless of their weight. So botched executions were pretty common. Really awful. Painful, terrifying. But the black humour takes hold."


Does Barnard have favourite “flash” terms?
QUOTE
“There are lots of terms I like,’’ he replies. “One that comes to mind is ‘to star the glaze’ for breaking a shop window. Other terms like ‘hopperdockers’ for shoes, is really fun — barefoot people hopped to dock their feet.’’


QUOTE
James Hardy Vaux was hardly a typical convict, forced to live on the breadline during the grimmest days of the industrial revolution, and stealing to survive.

Born in 1782 in Surrey, England, Vaux was the son of a London butler and grandson of a lawyer. He was relatively well-educated, [but] ......by Vaux’s “own admission, he was guilty of ‘buzzing, dragging, sneaking, hoisting, pinching, smashing, jumping, spanking and starring’,” — convict slang for different forms of theft, forgery and issuing counterfeit money. With a weakness for gambling, drinking and whoring, Vaux also boasted he was involved in illegal activities such as “the letter-racket, the order-racket and the snuff-racket”.

However, his most startling pursuits were literary: in 1812, while at Newcastle’s Penal Station, he compiled an extensive dictionary of convict slang — the cant or “flash” language which transported felons used to describe and disguise their crimes.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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