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RARE EARTHS
nipper
post Posted: Jun 24 2019, 12:33 PM
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China solidifies Rare Earth dominance

http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/art...arth-processing
QUOTE
Today, the disparity between China and the United States continues in part because the Pentagon, government agencies, and the finance and mining industries measure the extraction of rare earths at the mining and oxide production level. Hundreds of rare earth mining projects outside of China have been initiated, giving the erroneous impression that Western rare earth dependence on China may be declining. However, most ultimately fail.

Out of more than 400 rare earth startups publicly listed in 2012, less than five reached production. Of those, only two reached significant volumes. Of those two, one is bankrupt and resurrected with Chinese financing and the other lost its operating permit for a short period.

During this time, China has taken significant equity and debt positions in many of these failed or faltering projects and will control them if they begin production....





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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jun 5 2019, 09:46 AM
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QUOTE
The United States will take “unprecedented actions” to ensure the supply of strategic minerals and rare earths critical to the tech sector and the military, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says.

China is a major supplier of the critical materials and as the trade conflict with Washington has escalated, Beijing has dangled a threat of cutting exports of rare earths as a counter-strike to US tariffs.

Mr Ross said in a statement that a new report designates 35 minerals as “critical to the economic and national security” of America, including uranium, titanium, and rare earth elements needed for smartphones, computers, aircraft and GPS systems, among other uses.

“These critical minerals are often overlooked but modern life without them would be impossible,” Mr Ross said. "Through the recommendations detailed in this report, the federal government will take unprecedented action to ensure that the United States will not be cut off from these vital materials.”

President Donald Trump has ramped up his aggressive stance towards China in a bid to pressure the country to change its objectionable trade practices but the most recent flare-up caused talks to breakdown, especially due to US actions against Chinese tech giant Huawei.

In December 2017, Mr Trump called on Commerce and other government agencies to develop new sources of critical minerals to reduce vulnerabilities to supply disruptions, especially from foreign sources.

The report calls for actions including improving supplies “through investment and trade with America’s allies,” while streamlining permitting for mining in the United States, including on federal lands. It also lists a plan to improve mapping and data collection to promote domestic mineral exploration.
AFP



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: May 31 2019, 02:03 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ May 31 2019, 01:53 PM

Opportunities Exist within a Trade War

https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2019/05/31/opp...e-earths-boron/

QUOTE
US-China trade war has brought to the surface a number of vulnerable sectors, namely rare earths. Long-time readers will know of my support for Lynas (LYC) given the long-term demand from electric vehicle infrastructure and the current risks of China retaliations with a curb on rare earth exports has brought the importance AND sensitivity of this sector to any supply disruptions back into focus. LYC jumped in two days by 50% to hit levels above $3.00! Other rare earth players like Peak Resources (PEK) and Alkane (ALK) leaped by 42% and 25% respectively.

Interestingly rare earth prices have been rising for several months now as shown below [see link]; Dysprosium Oxide shown in white, Terbium Oxide in yellow and Neodymium in orange. This suggests that there have been other underlying factors to the increase in prices beyond just the trade war this week. Could increasing demand from the application of EVs, electrical chargers and renewable energy beginning to have an effect?




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: May 31 2019, 01:53 PM
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China's Trade War "Nuclear Option"

https://amp-news-com-au.cdn.ampproject.org/...e418bdc6ad76537

QUOTE
With one shot, [China] could shoot-down the entire F-35 stealth fighter production program. It could cripple Silicon Valley. It could send Apple into administration.

“United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back,” the official mouthpiece of the ruling Chinese Communist Party, the People’s Daily , writes......




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: May 31 2019, 01:52 PM
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[b]x



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Mar 14 2019, 12:58 PM
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China becomes world's biggest importer of rare earths – analysts
Reuters
extract
QUOTE
Washington had last year proposed slapping tariffs on rare earth imports from China in a trade spat between the two countries, before reversing its decision.

Myanmar, meanwhile, last year became a vital source of dysprosium, terbium and gadolinium for China's magnet and alloy manufacturers, according to Castilloux, whose numbers are based on customs data and Adamas' own research.

If Beijing ends up banning rare earth imports from Myanmar this year — due to fears the Southeast Asian country is being used to "launder" illegally mined Chinese material — China could temporarily revert to being a net exporter of the seven key rare earths in 2019, Castilloux said.

But rising Chinese imports look set to be a long-term trend, he added. Other than Lynas Corp, a rare earth producer that operates in Malaysia and Australia, "any company that's reached production in recent years has done so by selling rare earth concentrate to China", Castilloux said.

http://www.mining.com/web/china-becomes-wo...arths-analysts/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 


blacksheep
post Posted: Jan 12 2019, 10:58 AM
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China tightens procedural grip on rare earth mineral exports
By IM STAFF
Published: Friday, 11 January 2019
QUOTE
Strict observance and application of new guidelines are intended to limit smuggling of rare-earth materials, but the country’s dominant position in the market makes this an international concern.

By Sunder Singh

Chinese authorities made an unexpected move in the first week of January by issuing new guidelines for the export of rare-earth minerals exported from the country.

The guidelines were jointly released by the Ministry of Industry & Information Technology and 11 other government agencies, and are expected to further restrict the East Asian country’s exports of rare-earth minerals.

Under the released guidelines, authorities will strengthen their oversight of the mining, refining and exporting of rare-earth materials. They will follow the specified procedures strictly and "check every batch of rare earth exports." And there will be production shutdowns if companies are found to be in violation of export rules.

"The move is about cracking down on rare-earth smuggling rather than controlling exports. China is currently not putting a cap on rare-earth exports," Chen Zhanheng, vice secretary-general of the Association of China Rare Earth Industry (ACREI), said.

Global supply of rare-earth minerals is heavily dependent on China, and supply volumes are expected to be further squeezed by the application of the new guidelines.

China’s grip on rare-earths supply is so strong that, earlier this decade, a number of nations felt it necessary to ask the World Trade Organization (WTO) to force the nation to export more such minerals to global markets.


read more - https://www.indmin.com/Article/3853277/Chin...al-exports.html



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 18 2018, 08:17 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 18 2018, 06:09 PM

QUOTE
never heard of 'em, but there yoyu go


Strandline Resources Limited = STA which has a thread see ->>>> ttps://boards.sharecafe.com.au/index.php?showtopic=1376&hl=sta

By way of some background - STA acquired some of their mineral sands projects in Tanzania from Jacana Minerals Limited - Jacana - ASX JAC - tried to IPO them, and a couple of other tenements including graphite, but didn't for what ever reason that was not disclosed to the market at the time The tenements were originally spun out of SYR into JAC, then into STA. Tom Eadie, former founding SYR director and also CSE, is on the STA board. Former SYR director/CEO Tolga Kumova has shares in STA under his private company SISU INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD. CSE director HARRY HATCH/HARALAMBOS HATZIKYRIAZIS /.GASMERE PTY LTD holds a number of STA shares, as does CSE. CSE holds approx 12.05 million shares in SYR

Barry Fitzgerald, the author of your article, is a friend of Tolga, who he often refers to as a "bustling mining investor" and "the man with the midas touch" biggrin.gif
http://www.strandline.com.au/irm/content/t...ne.aspx?RID=371
http://www.strandline.com.au/irm/PDF/2657_...ttoShareholders



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 18 2018, 06:09 PM
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QUOTE
Owning one of the best-undeveloped minerals projects (BUPs) is no guarantee of success. But it stands to reason that it helps.

Argonaut's 2018 review of the BUPs is now floating around and the over-riding theme was that there are fewer of them around this year because of the lag between exploration expenditure rising and discoveries being made.

Argonaut’s ‘bottom-up’ assessment of the BUPs is commodity and management-agnostic and has five key selection criteria: the projects considered for inclusion are at the development stage between scoping study and pre-commercial production, they must have an internal rate of return of more than 25%, they must demonstrate the capacity to be profitable through all market/commodity price cycles, they must have a high likelihood of achieving more than $100m project valuation within 24 months and they must have a market cap of less than $5 billion.

It is well worth a read. But today’s interest is in Argonaut’s inclusion of the mineral sands developer Strandline (STA) in its “special mention projects” that sit in the second tier of the firm’s assessment of who has the BUPs.

Argonaut has a 20c price target on the stock after applying a 30% discount to its 28c a share valuation of Strandline’s start-up Fungoni project in Tanzania and its other interests in the country as well as its much larger Coburn project in Western Australia.
The target price is kind of interesting given Strandline is currently trading at 9.8c. Like the other mineral sands players, it has come under price pressure in the past couple of months because of overblown concerns with rutile prices.

Forgetting for a moment that Strandline’s projects are skewed more to zircon than rutile, the sell-off is despite the advice from the local king of the business, Iluka, that while prices might be softening, the rutile market remains particularly tight
https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2018/12/14/str...veloped-assets/

- never heard of 'em, but there yoyu go



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 10 2018, 07:58 PM
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Importance of rare earth metals mining makes it into COP24
Valentina Ruiz Leotaud |
QUOTE
In a series of talks that took place within the COP24 summit in Katowice, Poland, defenders of the circular economy highlighted the importance of including mining of rare earth metals into their discussions.

Based on a research document focused on the Netherlands and prepared by consulting and venture building firm Metabolic, the experts agreed that resources are the missing link in the climate debate. In their view, this is a mistake because rare earth metals are needed to build enough solar panels and wind turbines to meet the Paris Climate Agreement targets.

In detail, the report found that achieving such goals requires major inputs of iron and steel for the foundation and shaft of wind turbines. At the same time, elements such as silicon, copper, lead, and zinc are needed. However, their supply is more or less guaranteed given that they have been used in large quantities for decades.

Other metals, such as neodymium, terbium, indium, dysprosium, and praseodymium, would need to be mined in larger quantities and production would need to grow as much as 12-fold by 2050 compared to today’s output.

Besides being key components of wind turbine and solar technologies, these metals are used in electronic equipment like hard drives, loudspeakers, and LCD-screens.

Neodymium, for example, is used for permanent magnets in wind turbines and in electric vehicles. Using the Netherlands’ demand as a case study, the document states that the country will have about 1.2 million electric cars in 2030, resulting in an average demand of 100,000 electric cars per year. With a neodymium demand of 1.46 kg per car, the result is a total demand of 146 tonnes per year. In other words, the Dutch demand for neodymium – only related to the energy transition – would amount to 4% of the global annual production.

Just focusing on electric vehicles, Metabolic expects total lithium and cobalt demand to increase by a factor of 25 towards 2050.

Keeping these forecasts in mind, the consultancy proposes the idea of developing a European mining industry, given that the continent is almost completely dependent on foreign supply of critical metals, despite the fact that it hosts some reserves.

The report also suggests enabling the production of renewable electricity with a smaller demand for critical metals and increasing circular design and recycling efforts by embedding circular design principles into the production of wind turbines and PV panels, to enable future reuse of components and materials at end-of-life.

http://www.mining.com/importance-rare-eart...ng-makes-cop24/

The full research report - https://www.metabolic.nl/publications/metal...on-netherlands/
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Demand_768x678.png ( 256.35K ) Number of downloads: 4

 




--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
 


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