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Climate, Earth's Climate
henrietta
post Posted: Today, 06:43 AM
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In Reply To: sprotty's post @ Today, 06:09 AM

Mate, feel free to call me petty names if that floats your boat. My beef with BOM is that they changed from using raw data to "homogenised" data, which then gives them the power to pick and choose which numbers they want to use. As far as I'm concerned that is not a proper scientific approach.
The world may well be warming, as it has done many times before. I'm not convinced that our human actions are the major cause. I really don't want the world to waste trillions doing unnecessary and fruitless actions.

Cheers
J

 
sprotty
post Posted: Today, 06:09 AM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Yesterday, 08:27 PM

Just what do you think is their agenda? It's pretty clear what the "deniers" agenda is but not so clear what the agenda is of those who are reporting the effects of climate change other than to make change before its too late.

 
henrietta
post Posted: Yesterday, 08:27 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Yesterday, 07:27 PM

I haven't trusted BOM climate statistics for some time ........ ever since I found out that they started "homogenising", and ignoring carefully collected data by hundreds of volunteers over a century or more.

The BOM has an agenda, which is a shame, because it used to be universally trusted, even if it wasn't always correct. The BOM executives should hang their heads in shame.

Cheers
J

 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Yesterday, 07:27 PM
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Here is a perfectly good example why I have some measure of distrust in relation to the "the world is hotta than evahhh" meme.

From Jo Nova
QUOTE
If the Bureau of Meteorology’s Australian Climate Observation Reference Network (ACORN) accurately corrects historic temperature observations, it means that Marble Bar in the north of WA can no longer boast it had a world record heatwave in 1923/24.

Marble Bar has been world famous for decades because of the 160 consecutive days in which it recorded maxima at or above 37.8C (100F or a “century” in the Fahrenheit days).

The Marble Bar thermometer in a Stevenson screen topped 100F every day from 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924, and nowhere else on earth is known to have recorded 160 century days in a row without a break.

Marble Bar is now a runner-up
The BoM website used to have a Climate Education page explaining Marble Bar’s heatwave record. The National Library of Australia considered it to be of national significance and has archived it for posterity.

In 2020, the BoM website still has a page that explains: Marble Bar, in the Pilbara, holds the Australian record for the longest sequence of days over the old century mark (100°F or 37.8°C). This occurred during the period from 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924 when the maximum temperature equalled or exceeded 100°F for 160 days in a row.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics acknowledges the world record and Australians have heard about the Marble Bar heatwave record for many decades :



QUOTE
Temperature dataset downloads from the BoM website show that ACORN has cooled 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924 so much that the Pilbara town can no longer boast that it had a world record 160 consecutive days above 37.8C.

ACORN 2, which is described as a world-class homogenisation network, has reduced the 160 days to just 128 – from 1 November 1923 to 7 March 1924.

From 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924, the dates during which the 160 days of 100 or more were recorded, there’s now 153 days at or above 100F.

And the winner is … America
Wikipedia’s Death Valley page states that “The greatest number of consecutive days with a maximum temperature of 100 °F (38 °C) or above was 154 days in the summer of 2001.” This data is confirmed by the American Meteorological Society, which also references 134 consecutive days at Furnace Creek in Death Valley that were above above 37.8C during the summer of 1974.

154 days is less than 160 days but a lot more than 128 days, so it seems that America now holds the world record heatwave of consecutive 37.8C+ days at Death Valley – thanks to ACORN.

On its archived Climate Education page, the BoM states that “The highest temperature recorded during the record spell was 47.5°C on 18 January 1924.”

This is correct in the original RAW temperature dataset (see below), but ACORN 2 cools 18 January 1924 to 47.3C.

An Excel spreadsheet (499kb) with columns of daily maximum temperatures at Marble Bar from October 1923 to April 1924 in ACORN 1, ACORN 2 and RAW can be downloaded here.

Daily cooling adjustments
BoM temperature adjustments to ACORN weather stations have cooled Australia’s history of very hot days (see No more extreme hot days in Australia than 100 years ago and The Australian Bureau of Met hides 50 years of very hot days).

Politicians and climate change skeptics are often scorned for suggesting that the BoM adjusts temperature data to fit a global warming agenda or to cool the past (e.g. Media Watch), and in late 2019 SBS News reported that the bureau denied it has rewritten Australia’s climate record.



No explanation, no press release.
How many other temperatures have been surreptitiously changed?

Mick



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Said 'Thanks' for this post: henrietta  
 
rlane
post Posted: Feb 25 2020, 05:49 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Feb 23 2020, 10:23 PM

New book ( I thought the title a bit extreme)

Interview with the author

https://www.vox.com/2020/2/24/21145687/clim...-book-interview

and a review

http://www.librarything.com/work/22608713/reviews/172560865

 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Feb 25 2020, 08:32 AM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Feb 24 2020, 11:56 PM

The problems still exist.
The salts are highly corrosive, regardless of the use.
The containment issues still apply.
There are still issues with the high freezing point of salts.
Mick



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sentifi.com

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joules mm1
post Posted: Feb 24 2020, 11:56 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Feb 24 2020, 06:18 PM

it had me scratching my head until it got to this :

" All these problems are potentially solvable, apart possibly from the materials one,
but these are very difficult engineering challenges. There are potentially other designs which are more promising for space flight. "

this is vastly different to landbased facility designed to provide cabled electricity to a neighbourhood

https://www.engineering.com/DesignerEdge/De...-Roadblock.aspx









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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Feb 24 2020, 06:18 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Feb 23 2020, 08:02 PM

I don't know how accurate the following is, as i am not a Physicist, merely an engineer.
Some of it makes sense to me.
QUOTE
Molten salts are corrosive, and there is not much data on nuclear suitable materials (low neutron absorption, low activation, low neutron induced damage/embrittlement) for the long life times which would be needed for such a reactor.

Maintenance is difficult because the salts will freeze at room temperatures, therefore all maintenance has to be performed with the system at operating temperature.

High freezing point of the salt makes mitigation of certain accidents difficult - e.g. a main steam line break will lead to rapid cooling of the salt in the steam generator, potentially freezing up the steam generator and preventing proper cooling of the core.

If you want to go for the even more radical idea of having a fuel dissolved in the molten salt, then you have even more major problems.

The fuel salt is exceedingly radioactive, which makes any kind of maintenance on the primary circuit near impossible. In a solid fuel reactor a ruptured fuel rod isn't a major problem - the coolant can be filtered to remove the contaminants, which are present at a low level, and the failed rod removed. In a fuel salt reactor, just one drop of fuel salt leaking from a valve or pump seal, will be so radioactive, that you won't be able to send workers within 50 feet of the valve, even if you drain and flush the whole reactor first.

The fuel salt contains a soup of dozens of fission product elements. This is a nightmare for corrosion reasons, because you can't control the fuel composition. Different products can plate out on surfaces (mainly metals like platinum, rhodium, gold, etc.) and this can mess up clearances on valves and pumps. Some products like indium attack structural metals by alloying with them (similar to gallium or mercury).

The epithermal neutron spectrum in this type of reactor is much more damaging to moderator and core materials than the thermal spectrum of LWRs - there are even fewer validated materials available which can be used in this environment.

Radiation in the salt causes fluorine to be produced by radiolysis, and this can volatilize uranium and plutonium, and these distilled enriched isotopes, can precipitate outside of the reactor within the plant, and are a risk of criticality accident (in fact, there was nearly a catastrophic criticality accident during the decomissioning of the oak ridge MSRE where near-weapons grade uranium had distilled off and condensed in a filter bank).

All these problems are potentially solvable, apart possibly from the materials one, but these are very difficult engineering challenges. There are potentially other designs which are more promising for space flight.

One example is a combined solid-fuel, solid moderator, highly reflected kilowatt scale reactor. In this design the core is a solid matrix of uranium metal and zirconium hydride moderator, surrounded by a beryllium or zirconium hydride reflector. This design will operate at low power densities, which can be passively cooled using simple heatpipes similar to RTGs. It has an exceptionally strong negative temperature coefficient, so is self controlling in the event of a change in heat demand (e.g. failure of a heatpipe), without the need to use control rods for power control, only for shutdown. As a the fuel is a solid matrix, there are no corrosion concerns and no leak concerns. The low power density and high thermal conductivity of the fuel matrix mean that partial meltdown is precluded. Passive radiators can protect against decay heat and possibly also incomplete shutdown.


Full discussion HERE

Mick




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lgrif
post Posted: Feb 24 2020, 04:59 PM
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In Reply To: joules mm1's post @ Feb 23 2020, 08:02 PM

IF Ozzie Company HB11 can successfully develop it's Boron-hydrogen fusion project Bill Gates nuclear energy plant ( & most others) will be obsolete.
Currently that's still a big "if".
I missed Scomo's Friday speech, did he specify Gov grants to this project ?


 
joules mm1
post Posted: Feb 23 2020, 10:23 PM
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anti-science Trump says climate change is a hoax

The United States is blocking the G20 from mentioning climate change as a risk to economic growth in its draft communiqué, diplomats said

https://twitter.com/i/status/1231441050662658051



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
 


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