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NEWS PAPER OR MEDIA ARTICLES, ANYTHING INTERESTING
blacksheep
post Posted: Sep 2 2019, 10:15 AM
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Australia launches A$12.5m mining research centre

QUOTE
The Australian government announced that it will provide A$3.7 million in funding for a new national mining research and training centre called the ‘Australian Research Council Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Integrated Operations for Complex Resources.’

The centre had already received another A$2 million from different foundations plus A$6.8 million in-kind support from research and industry organizations.

What a bloody long winded name - even the abbreviated acronym is a mouth full - ARCITTCIOCR - good luck people getting their tongue around biggrin.gif

https://www.mining.com/australia-launches-a...esearch-centre/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 31 2019, 10:27 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Aug 31 2019, 09:25 AM

Which was in 1992!

QUOTE
... summitry is fast becoming a substitute for decision-making
- ain't that the truth



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Aug 31 2019, 09:25 AM
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The UK and Europe are locked in a battle over the Brexit details.
Whatever people think of Margaret Thatchers policies, in some areas she was remarkably prescient.
From a speech she gave to CNN World Development Conference
QUOTE
If the divergence between different European economies is so great that even the ERM cannot contain them, how would those economies react to a single European currency? The answer is that there would be chaos of the sort which would make the difficulties of recent days pale by comparison.

Hugh sums would have to be transferred from richer to poorer countries and regions to allow them to take the strain. Even then unemployment and mass migration across now open frontiers would follow. And a full-fledged Single currency would allow no escape hatch.

The political consequences can already be glimpsed: the growth of extremist parties, battening on fears about mass immigration and unemployment, offering a real — if thoroughly unwelcome — alternative to the Euro-centrist political establishment.

If in addition you were to create a supra-national European federation, and the people could no longer hold their national parliaments to account, extremism could only grow further.

It is time for the European politicians to sit up and take note. Time to stop their endless rounds of summits — summitry is fast becoming a substitute for decision-making — and observe the reality around them.

There is a growing sense of remoteness, an alienation of people from their institutions of government and their political leaders. There is a fear that the European train will thunder forward, laden with its customary cargo of gravy, towards a destination neither wished nor understood by electorates. But the train can be stopped.

Tomorrow, the French people will vote on the future of Europe. It is not for me to instruct them on French interest.

But I must stress that the referendum is not a vote on whether we should have a European Community — but on what kind of European Community it should be.

Whatever the result, France will continue to build Europe because Europe cannot be built without France. But is it to be a Europe des Bureaux? Or a Europe des Patries? The Europe of Delors? Or the Europe of De Gaulle? If I were a Frenchwoman, I would rally to the General's standard and cry: “Vive L'Europe Libre!” .



If ever there was an apt description of what is happening in the UK and Europe, there it is. She predicted the rise of alienated exremist parties, and "Europe des Delors".

Hindsight is easy, foresight is brilliant.

Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  nipper  
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 29 2019, 11:49 AM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Aug 29 2019, 11:16 AM

i'd reckon a lot of people are Trysexual



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 29 2019, 11:16 AM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Aug 29 2019, 07:57 AM

LGBTIQ+ Terminology

Glossary: Physical Sex, Sexuality, Gender Identity and Gender Expression
Several terms and definitions are provided below. They are starting points to understanding physical sex, sexuality, gender identity and gender expression. This glossary is constantly growing and evolving and we acknowledge that there are limitations to any definition or terminology.

QUOTE
LGBTIQ: Acronym for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex and Queer. Often Asexual is added, LGBTIQA


See full list - https://www.uts.edu.au/partners-and-communi...der-sexuality-5

Quite an eye opener - never heard of half of these "genders" I must lead a sheltered life biggrin.gif



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 29 2019, 09:07 AM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Aug 29 2019, 07:57 AM

Doesn't matter... It's a community, that's all



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


henrietta
post Posted: Aug 29 2019, 07:57 AM
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I see in today’s “Australian” a reference to LGBTIQ+. ............ what is “+” ? Is that a catch all inclusion? I also note that the letters IQ are there ....... I wonder about that.

Cheers
J

 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Aug 26 2019, 10:26 AM
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I wasn't sure whether I should put this in the news section or the gold section, but as I have already fluffed a lot about gold, I decided on the former.

QUOTE
As the Federal Government moves to ban cash transactions above $10,000, there's a theory gaining traction that the real motive for the cash ban isn't the so-called "black economy", but rather, to give authorities greater control over your behaviour during recessions.

$10,000 cash ban on the cards

Paying more than $10,000 in cash could make you a criminal under proposed law
This theory, put forward by economists such as John Adams — and picked up by some federal politicians — has not been plucked out of thin air.

It is based on repeated public papers and statements by the international body in charge of financial stability — the Washington-based International Monetary Fund (IMF).

A recent IMF blog entitled "Cashing In: How to Make Negative Interest Rates Work", explains its motive in wanting negative interest rates — a situation where instead of receiving money on deposits, depositors must pay regularly to keep their money with the bank.

As the blog notes, during the global financial crisis central banks reduced interest rates.

Ten years later, interest rates remain low in most countries, and "while the global economy has been recovering, future downturns are inevitable".

"Severe recessions have historically required 3 to 6 percentage points cut in policy rates," the IMF blog observed.

"If another crisis happens, few countries would have that kind of room for monetary policy to respond."

The article then goes on to explain that to "get around this problem", a recent IMF staff study looked at how it could bring in a system that would make deeply negative interest rates "a feasible option".

The answer, it said, is to phase out cash.

Cash acts as an 'interest rate floor'
When cash is available, cutting interest rates into negative territory becomes impossible.

We are being pushed into a cashless world

The RBA says cash will become a niche payment sooner than we think, as the Government considers imposing tougher penalties on cash economy activity.
Cash acts as "an interest rate floor" as people hold cash when bank deposit interest rates are at zero.

The thought of paying the major banks to hold your money isn't one that most consumers would jump at.

The alternative — as risky as it may be — is hoarding cash, or making investments in tangible commodities like gold.

So, the end game, the article explains, is the IMF's ideal world — one without cash.

"Without cash, depositors would have to pay the negative interest rate to keep their money with the bank, making consumption and investment more attractive," it said.

This, would "jolt lending, boost demand, and stimulate the economy".

In other words, the central banks get greater control to influence your behaviour and economic outcomes.

For those who have faith in monetary policy and central banks, this is no problem.

But one year on from the banking royal commission, faith in our financial institutions — and the regulators who failed to police the banks' bad behaviour — isn't exactly at an all-time high.

Negative interest rates could affect Australia
This weird world where savers are penalised — and borrowers get paid — is no longer just a problem for central banks in Europe and Japan.

Australia joins low rate club

With the cash rate down to a fresh low of 1 per cent, Australia has entered what's been dubbed the "era of irrationality, impotence and inequality".
The Reserve Bank's consecutive interest rate cuts in June and July have taken the cash rate to an historical low at just 1 per cent.

Put this together with Governor Philip Lowe's comment on August 9 at a parliamentary hearing.

He was asked by Labor's Andrew Leigh what work the Reserve Bank has done on what "unconventional monetary policy" might look like as Australia heads towards the zero lower bound of interest rates.

Dr Lowe answered: "I think it's unlikely, but it is possible. We are prepared to do unconventional things if the circumstances warranted it."

In answering some other questions Dr Leigh threw his way, Dr Lowe also noted that "monetary policy is less effective than it used to be".

"Once upon a time, when we lowered interest rates people were very quick to run off to the bank to borrow more to spend," he said.

"In today's environment people don't run off to the bank to borrow more when interest rates fall; they are more likely to pay back their mortgage more quickly."

Dr Lowe also noted international political tensions are weakening the global outlook, "and it's very hard for central banks to completely offset that".

Phasing out cash to target Aussie 'national sport'
Now let's return to the problem of the 'black economy'.

Why we love cash so much

If cash is good enough for central banks and it's still popular with the public, will the Government's crackdown on large transactions work?
Australia is not standing alone in moving towards a cash limit.

A number of other countries have already imposed limits — France has banned cash transactions above 1,000 euros; Spain above 2,500 euros; Italy above 3,000 euros.

Also, in 2016 the European Central Bank (ECB) announced it would end the production and issuance of its 500 euro note at the end of 2018.

As the ECB was implementing this change, the man who headed the Federal Government's Black Economy Taskforce — the late Michael Andrew (he died in June) — was undertaking the enormous task of pulling together an array of information about the scale of the illegal cash economy.

Mr Andrews has previously said that the biggest hurdle to tackling the black economy is cultural.

Australians, he said, viewed taking cash-only payments and not declaring it as "almost a national sport".

The taskforce went on to estimate the cost of the illegal cash economy could now be about 3 per cent of GDP — roughly $50 billion.

But, this figure, it said, was a qualitative estimate, based on a wide definition of what activities make up the black economy.

The $50 billion estimate included a host of activities including underpaying wages or paying for work cash-in-hand, under-reporting income, sham contracting, phoenixing, identity fraud, ABN and GST fraud, evasion of illicit tobacco, money laundering, unregulated gambling, criminal acts, counterfeit goods and illegal drugs.

More changes flagged under 'black economy' banner
The taskforce in its final report suggested that the ABS do proper modelling on the economic and social costs.

Proposal to fight black economy under fire

Experts have slammed a Treasury proposal to reverse the onus of proof for black economy crimes.
This work has not yet been done.

Yet the Government is moving ahead with proposed laws that could make people criminals — with the threat of two years in jail — for spending more than $10,000 in cash.

The politics will dictate whether and how quickly the Government can push its cash limit bill through, with One Nation already indicating it will not support the proposed law, but Labor saying it likely will.

Opposition assistant treasury spokesman Stephen Jones has also indicated that he wants to see the ban apply to Bitcoin — a move that would send the Bitcoin industry into disarray given its repeated public campaigns to invest in the digital currency to avoid the proposed cash ban.

But that's not all that is in store under the Government's 'fighting the black economy' banner.

Treasury is asking the public whether the Government should also change the law to reverse the onus of proof for "serious black economy offences" and give the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) even more powers to hunt down whomever it deems to be a 'black economy' criminal.

This proposal has already faced much criticism from tax experts and business lobbies that say such measures could adversely impact the rights of individuals and their liberties.


I see the removal of cash as inevitable for a variety of reasons.

1. Reduces the ability of criminals to hide transactions.
2.Reduces the ability of people to avoid transaction taxes and GST/VAT.
3. Makes bank branches redundant.
4. The Reserve actually loses money printing notes, minting coins etc., so would be a saving for them.
5. people can be tracked by their EFT transactons. Always good for authorities to be able to track their citizens.
6. No messy handling of germ filled cash by customers/employees.
7. Makes even more money for the banks.

Elderly folk who have always used cash will be up in arms.
Civil libertarians will be up in arms.
Bob Katter will be up in arms.

But as usual, they will be overidden.

The biggest problem I can see is how am I going to pay for fuel or a meal at the store in Camerons Corner. No phone reception out there to do your EFT.

Mick





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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  henrietta  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Aug 8 2019, 09:32 AM
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Ahh, the hippocracy of politicians.
After spending years complaining about the Russians interfering in the US political system (meaning Trump), US congresspersons have threatened to block US/UK trade deals if the UK brexit closes the Irish border.
The irony of it all.

QUOTE
Any future US-UK trade deal would almost certainly be blocked by the US Congress if Brexit affects the Irish border and jeopardises peace in Northern Ireland, congressional leaders and diplomats have warned.

Boris Johnson has presented a trade deal with the US as a way of offsetting the economic costs of leaving the EU, and Donald Trump promised the two countries could strike “a very substantial trade agreement” that would increase trade “four or five times”.

Trump, however, would not be able to push an agreement through a hostile Congress, where there would be strong bipartisan opposition to any UK trade deal in the event of a threat to the 1998 Good Friday agreement, and to the open border between Northern Ireland and the Republic.

The comments came as Johnson was in Northern Ireland in an effort to revive power-sharing talks between his allies in the Democratic Unionist party and Sinn Féin, as well as discuss Brexit preparations.

The Guardian

However, their ABC sees this in an entirely different light.
Here is the headline frrom ABC News

QUOTE
OPINION
Ireland's border, Brexit and white supremacy manifesting in a way Trump didn't expect


and here is some of the report.
QUOTE
QUOTE

Last week, the United States Congress made an extraordinary intervention in British politics.

The "Friends of Ireland" Caucus, which includes both Republicans and Democrats, made it clear they would not support any US-UK trade deal if Britain's exit from the European Union in any way jeopardised the Good Friday Agreement.

It's not surprising the co-chair of the caucus, Democrat Richard Neal, would say such a thing. But Mr Neal was supported in his statements by his Republican colleagues.

In the current political environment, such a bipartisan consensus over potentially defying the will of President Donald Trump is noteworthy, to say the very least.

Given just how much political stock both Mr Trump and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson have put into the potential for a US-UK trade deal, this congressional threat has serious implications.

But it also gives us an unusual insight into how white supremacy works in the US.

Setting aside O'Reilly's egregious use of the term "legally", his tweet revealed a great deal. For many Americans, connection to Ireland is not just about family history and a shared resentment of British repression — it's also about shared whiteness.

This understanding of whiteness is based on the insistence that racism does not exist because, as O'Reilly claimed, white people are oppressed too.

In some of the darkest corners of the internet, this idea even goes so far as to include the belief that Irish people were actually enslaved, and suffered as much as, if not more than, African-Americans and people of colour.

Just like the other ideas that inform white supremacist ideology, this is a persistent and dangerous myth. As the events of last weekend prove once again, that danger is far from hypothetical.



I won't make any further comment, seeing as a good percentage my own whiteness originates from Ireland.

Mick





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Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
frootloops
post Posted: Jul 31 2019, 04:23 PM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Jul 31 2019, 03:16 PM


Socialist Bill was the most surprised.

The WHOLE country dodged a bullet election night.


Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  mullokintyre  
 
 


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