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Nickel, Discussion
early birds
post Posted: Jun 7 2021, 12:18 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jun 7 2021, 09:38 AM

thanks nipper tongue.gif

PAN now i see what i'm use to puy my hands on and been stopped out few years back [bought at 0.30's and stopped out at 0.25]
thought PAN was good growth stock at the time [ they ramped me into it] lmaosmiley.gif

now it is 16cps as i looked at just now,


anything else you think is better bet for nickel ?? unsure.gif


 
nipper
post Posted: Jun 7 2021, 09:38 AM
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there is a list here on Small Caps site (or should that be small caps?). It ranges from the established producers to those soon to be, right down to the hopeful minnows. There seem to be quite a few projects that have been shelved, waiting for the Ni price to be more attractive. in other words, supply is not an issue.

Very few are solely focused on Nickel, mainly because of the complex metallurgy .


https://smallcaps.com.au/nickel-stocks-asx-ultimate-guide/




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
early birds
post Posted: Jun 5 2021, 07:16 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jun 5 2021, 01:02 PM

any nickel stocks, kinda remember a small one but forgot the code and name!!

please feed us few names nipper!! tongue.gif



 
nipper
post Posted: Jun 5 2021, 01:02 PM
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There is guarded optimism about future strength in the nickel price from a just released study from Fitch ratings.

Fitch Solutions (which last month released am upbeat report on iron ore) said this week it expects nickel prices to continue rising slowly as the world market continues to see a deficit in supply.

As a result, Fitch Solutions has lifted its long term nickel price outlook from $US15,750 a tonne to $US16,500 per tonne for 2021.

Three month nickel on the LME ended above $US18,100 a tonne (= $8 a pound) on Wednesday before easing Friday to $US17,972 a tonne.

Fitch says nickel prices are expected to continue to ease from present spot levels in the coming months, as demand from the steel sector stabilises and new nickel production ramps up....


https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2021/06/04/jus...e-stuff-really/



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 26 2021, 05:55 PM
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Nickel is over US$8/lb. ... Was under $5 last March



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Oct 24 2020, 02:26 PM
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In 2016 nickel stocks were friendless, brutalised by years of falling prices.

Multi commodity miner BHP had attempted to offload its WA based nickel division a number of times. Western Areas WSA was slashing costs left and right, while Mincor MCR and Poseidon Nickel POS were forced to shut down their operations entirely.

Exploration essentially stopped dead.

Around 2017, the we need a crapload more nickel for batteries thematic emerged from the tail end of company presentations.

These EV demand projections subsequently moved to the front and repeated ad nauseum by nickel companies who were (are still are) largely supplying the stainless steel industry.

But mines take many years to develop. It is the demand outlook which is important, especially for explorers. Recent high profile comments by Tesla's Elon Musk have made this demand story extra palpable to investors. The electric vehicle trailblazer alone could need up to 1.15 million tonnes of nickel a year, almost 50 per cent of current global supply, by 2030 to meet ambitious production targets. It's a seemingly impossible goal, but the intent is there.

WA players are stepping up to the plate. In 2019, a revitalised Nickel West, once the red-headed stepchild of BHP's portfolio, was given 'core' status and the cash to expand operations. About 70 per cent of Nickel West's ~80,000tpa production now goes to battery manufacturers.

A cashed up Mincor has just started project development and will shortly be a nickel miner once again. Poseidon Nickel is considering a restart of its Black Swan operation.

But most importantly; a reinvigorated exploration sector has generated an extraordinary number of high profile WA nickel discoveries over the past 12 months. These company making finds include Julimar for Chalice, Mawson for Legend Mining, Poseidons Golden Swan, Estrella Resources and its Carr Boyd, and Azure with Andover.

https://stockhead.com.au/resources/high-vol...overies-galore/



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


mullokintyre
post Posted: Aug 27 2020, 12:34 PM
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A novel approach to Nickel production, via plants, that is floras type plants rather than industrial plants.
From BBC

QUOTE
Rare and valuable plants that naturally “mine” large quantities of nickel are thought to be hiding in Indonesia’s forests – but it is a race to discover them before they are wiped out.Most plants draw up tiny amounts of heavy metals to activate some important enzymes, and nickel is needed to activate one crucial to plants’ flowering process. But even slightly too much nickel can poison and kill most plants. Nickel hyper-accumulators, however, have evolved the ability to withstand this excess by binding the metal inside their cell walls or storing it in their vacuoles – a storage organelle inside the cell, says Tjoa. They mainly store the nickel in their shoots, leaves, roots or sap.
Some nickel-loving species like Alyssum murale, native to Italy, can take up to 30,000 micrograms of nickel per 1g dried leaf. Some, like Phyllantus balgoyii, found in Malaysia, have such a high nickel content that their sap is a remarkable bright blue-green colour. So far, around 450 species of nickel-loving plants have been documented worldwide. Most of these plants grow in countries with less plant diversity and lower nickel deposits than Indonesia, such as Cuba (130 species), southern Europe (45), New Caledonia (65) and Malaysia (24).
After four years of exploration, Tjoa at last spotted two species of indigenous nickel hyper-accumulators in 2008: Sarcotheca celebica and Knema matanensis. In the lab, she found that both of these native plants could store between 1,000 and 5,000 micrograms of nickel per gram of dried leaf.

It was a start, but Tjoa was still hoping for something more. Compared with nickel-loving plants found elsewhere, these two showed fairly modest powers of hyperaccumulation. “We’re looking for plants that could accumulate at least 10,000 micrograms [per gram],” she says. At that threshold, it becomes economically viable to cultivate the plant for mineral extraction – or “phytomining”.

Tjoa’s research on these plants drew the attention of Satria Bijaksana, a professor of rock magnetism from Bandung Institute of Technology. Bijaksana was looking for relevant research on the relationship between Sulawesi’s geology and ecology, when he became fascinated by the phytomining studies conducted by Tjoa and by van der Ent. He wondered if his own expertise in magnetism could help speed up the search.
As hyper-accumulators have very high quantities of metals, so do their ashes once they have been burned – and some of these metals are magnetic. A number of studies have shown that nickel uptake in hyper-accumulator plants happens at the same time with the uptake of iron – a highly magnetic metal. Together with Tjoa, Bijaksana designed an experiment to see if magnetic susceptibility increases when the plants accumulate more nickel. By comparing the ashes from two species of well-known hyper-accumulators (Alyssum murale and Alyssum corsicum) with 10 indigenous plants in Sulawesi and Halmahera, they found another positive result – one of the native plants was high in both iron and nickel.

No other country has a greater potential for phytomining than Indonesia – van der Ent
“We think using magnetism could speed up the process because it only detects high concentrations of nickel,” says Bijaksana, leading to fewer false positives as a result. Their study, which was published in May 2020, identified two further species of nickel-loving plants from Sulawesi: Casearia halmaherensis and another that was a type of pepper. Both could accumulate 2,600-2,900 micrograms in 1g of dried leaf. While the research is still preliminary, Bijaksana hopes it could convince people to take phytomining seriously in Indonesia.The beauty of nickel hyper-accumulators is that they collect something that is both a toxic pollutant if left in the soil, and a valuable material – nickel is used in making products from kitchen taps to electric car batteries. Collecting the nickel from plants is a relatively easy process.

The University of Queensland’s van der Ent has calculated that a hyper-accumulator like Phyllantus balgoyii can produce an estimated 120kg of nickel per hectare every year. That translates to a market value of around $1,754 (£1,300) per hectare. Extracting the nickel involves pruning the shoots – which hold the highest concentrations of the metal – and burning them, after which the nickel can be separated from the ash. This involves releasing carbon dioxide through burning, but the continuous cultivation of nickel hyper-accumulators can be considered carbon neutral, says van der Ent. “All carbon released from the burning will be ‘captured’ again by the newly growing crop in a few months,” he says.


Might be way for small communities in poor regions to make a few bucks.

Mick



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nipper
post Posted: Dec 9 2019, 10:02 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 7 2019, 10:48 AM

"As Talk Of Legend’s WA Nickel Find Gains Pace, Orion Looks To Be Sitting Pretty Right Next Door"

- funny thing, markets. With LEG announcing, its share price more than doubles, while ORN is flat but the other 2 mentioned in dispatches, BOA and GAL, both slipping 20+%



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 7 2019, 10:48 AM
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As Talk Of Legend’s WA Nickel Find Gains Pace, Orion Looks To Be Sitting Pretty Right Next Door
QUOTE
Excitement is building around the expected release on Monday of the eagerly awaited assay results from the third hole drilled at Legend Mining’s (LEG) Area D prospect at its Rockford project in WA’s Fraser Range. Legend Mining was 4.2c a share ahead of going into a trading halt last week and a trading suspension this week, pending the release of the assay results.

Industry chatter is that Legend has made a significant nickel-copper discovery, with lots of talk about a 16m intersection of massive to semi massive sulphides having been encountered, with 20m of disseminated sulphides on either side.

If the whispers about the intersection being particularly rich - the chatter is for more than 4% nickel - then there will be some fun to be had for the juniors with a presence in the northern reaches of the Fraser. It was of course the 2012 discovery hole drilled by junior explorer Sirius Resources down south which went on to become the Nova nickel-copper deposit/mine, with Sirius taken over by Independence (IGO) in 2015 for $1.8 billion.

Independence has long believed the Fraser has more than one Nova to give up and has almost blanket coverage of the region’s prospective rocks, including an exposure to Legend’s Area D discovery through its 14.2% Legend shareholding.

Private “prospector” Mark Creasy is the other big player in the Fraser, thanks to his early pegging in the district after being impressed by what he saw from some rock kicking during an expedition for space junk from Skylab’s crash to earth in 1979. Creasy has the Silver Knight discovery to his name in the Fraser but because it is privately held, no one is sure if it is going to be another Nova or not. And for good measure, Creasy owns 26.8% of Legend.

Like the rest of us, Legend, Independence and Creasy will have to wait for the assays confirming Area D as something special before celebrating.... In anticipation of the results from Area D confirming a discovery, juniors with Fraser Range exposure have already been enjoying something of a share price celebration.

Galileo Mining (GAL), where Creasy is a 31% shareholder, has shot up from 11c since Legend went into a trading halt on November 28 to 21c, while Boadicea (BOA) has come up from 22c to 26c.

Today’s interest though is in Orion Minerals (ORN) which was trading yesterday at 2.8c to be pretty much were it was before Legend alerted the market to its Area D discovery hole, assays pending.
https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2019/12/06/as-...ight-next-door/

- Lots of nearology happening here. one for you, Blackie, to look into/ tear apart?



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 5 2019, 09:58 AM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Nov 19 2019, 12:45 PM

Vale aims to boost nickel production by 70%
Cecilia Jamasmie | December 4, 2019 |
QUOTE
Brazilian mining giant Vale (NYSE:VALE) said on Wednesday it would hike nickel production by about 70% in coming years to 360,000 tonnes a year, mainly by expanding in Indonesia.

The Brazilian mining giant plans to exit its troubled New Caledonia assets but still aims to ramp up nickel output ahead of rising demand for electric batteries, executives said.


QUOTE
The plan for now is to shut the nickel refinery and stop cobalt production, which will result in a yet to be specified number of job losses, according to RNZ.

Vale said in November that it would write down its New Caledonia mine and incur a non-cash impairment charge of about $1.6 billion in the fourth quarter.

Nickel is the only base metal to have recorded gains this year, but prices for the key ingredient in stainless steel and electric vehicle batteries have begun to fall on concerns that an expanded trade war between the US and several countries including China, Brazil, Argentina and France, may dent demand.

Last week, the metal hit its lowest in more than four months and posted its steepest monthly loss (18%) in eight years on faltering steel output from top producer China and waning impact from an Indonesian ore export ban.

https://www.mining.com/vale-puts-new-caledo...on-up-for-sale/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
 


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