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COVID-19, Pandemic
plastic
post Posted: Apr 15 2020, 06:28 AM
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Looks like I am not the only one. Just look at VLA and what they were doing. They were so good at it, the Americans bought them out.

https://www.zerohedge.com/health/pew-poll-3...mber-about-grow

QUOTE
Pew Poll: 30% Of Americans Say Coronavirus Was Made In A Lab - That Number Is About To Grow




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What did Uncle Mel do to us?
 
jacsar
post Posted: Apr 14 2020, 08:03 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Apr 14 2020, 02:13 PM

This could be posted on various links but seems to be the best place here with questioning minds .... here is an article that will hurt the sensitivities of many and mostly offend the rest.......... https://www.clivemaund.com/article.php?id=5342


Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  trisail  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 14 2020, 07:27 PM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Apr 14 2020, 03:55 PM

Yeah, if it wasn't a dinner party, there must have been some fairly serious departure from isolation protocols to produce such a big and concentrated cluster.
Not sure if we will ever find the truth, too many reputations at stake for that to happen.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
henrietta
post Posted: Apr 14 2020, 03:55 PM
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Mmmmmmmmmmm

QUOTE
Coronavirus: Brendan Murphy retracts ‘dinner party’ link to Tasmanian cluster as Peter Gutwein calls for police probe


Something a bit fishy here, methinks.

Cheers
J



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"Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits." Satchel Paige

"No road is long with good company." Traditional
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 14 2020, 02:13 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Apr 14 2020, 01:54 PM

So mathematically correct.
QUOTE
Decimation is only 10%; I'm hoping for 90% evisceration.

Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 14 2020, 01:54 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Apr 14 2020, 11:46 AM

um, tricky. The wonderful wacky world of retirement post Covid-19 (whenever that may be) is probably due for a shake-up. There has been a fair bit of wealth destruction and I'd reckon caution will reemerge with respect to asset protection. Less money to spend, less frivolity.

There's likely to be far fewer participants, so charmingly referred to as 'wealthy geriatrics', heading off anywhere,and they'll be sht-scared to go on a cruise (let alone, will there be some/ any form of insurance for OS travel?).

In fact, there may be far fewer participants, full stop. It depends on any success in current/ future efforts to halt the spread. Life expectancy tables may show a plateauing or even a dip in years to come.https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/3302.0.55.001

The bucket list will probably be reconfigured. Travel will probably take longer to recover than many are thinking. I can see easing of measures that are now in place being wound back only incrementally. First, intra-state, to revive some of the regional economies. Then interstate, when state governments (that control the Health Departments) think its OK. International flights ... even longer, and those deemed essential in nature, only. Quarantine may last longer than we think.

And of course the cheap airfare structure that allowed this may be in for a shake-up. Inflexible arrangements a year out - who's going to go along with such structures. And, again, the mickey mouse 'insurance' offering needs revisiting. All of this is going to man more expensive tix, IMO.

So, what will we have? It may all get back to normal, but probably only after 5-10 years. Until then, "short stays" up and down the coast? The other observable sub-group, the almost ubiquitous 'grey nomads', could roar back with a vengeance .

Am happy to see the cruise industry rust away. Decimation is only 10%; I'm hoping for 90% evisceration.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 14 2020, 11:46 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Apr 13 2020, 04:39 PM

If the cruise business gets decimated ( hopefully they do), what are all the wealthy geriatrics going to do to pass their time??
Mick




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nipper
post Posted: Apr 13 2020, 04:39 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Apr 13 2020, 10:17 AM

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.. parasitic law firms are lining up in droves to start the COVID-19 based class action suits....
and we all know how they operate.


Now, with the (otherwise delightful) consequence that cruise liners may not be around for much longer
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Flags of convenience make the cruise ship industry one of the world's least regulated, with owners and operators able to skirt more stringent workplace, health, safety and environmental rules........

Carnival Corporation is headquartered in Miami, as are the second and third biggest cruise corporations, Royal Caribbean and Norwegian. But Carnival is incorporated in Panama, Norwegian in Bermuda, and Royal Caribbean in Liberia. Now these "incorporations of convenience" threaten their survival. Their revenue has been cut to zero. The US Government is offering no assistance because they're foreign companies and their employees are spread across the world. Other governments are unlikely to do more.

Industry analysts say the big cruise operators have enough reserves to last six months. After that, if they don't secure funding, they face going out of business.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-13/coro...-ships/12141140

and if the operators have no money, then the ghouls will come after the health, immigration, port authorities; anyone with deep pockets (US as taxpayers). Going to be a bunfight.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 13 2020, 03:43 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Apr 13 2020, 03:07 PM

from Jo Nova

It seems that those hoping for the herd immunity solution may be barking up the wrong tree.



QUOTE
Herd Immunity is not realistic
For the first time we have true randomized testing –and it shows that Austria was officially picking up about a quarter of the real number of infections in the population. So when Austria was officially saying 7,000 were infected, the true number was 28,500. Finally, this puts a solid limit on the chance that asymptomatic rate of infection was high. There is no iceberg.

About 75% of cases were mild or truly asymptomatic (and thus not getting officially tested), but it was still only a small slice of the population — just one third of one percent.

Less than 1% of Austrians infected with coronavirus, study shows

The co-founder of Sora, Christoph Hofinger, told a news conference: “Based on this study, we believe that 0.33% of the population in Austria was acutely infected in early April.” Given the margin of error, the figure was 95% likely to be between 0.12% and 0.76%.

99% of the population is still vulnerable
The Austrian chancellor estimates only 1% of the population had had the infection (presumably he is including an estimate of people who had already had the virus, cleared it, and tested negative).

The Austrian chancellor, Sebastian Kurz, who saw initial findings a few days ago, said on Monday that the rate of infection was around 1%. This disproved the idea of herd immunity, which requires widespread infection, as a viable policy option, he said.

Austria has sampled 1,554 people with help from a polling company from April 1 – 6. The nose and throat swabs they used will have found active infections, not past ones. But the peak of infections was March 26, so this will still have included some, perhaps many, of those people who were infected the week before. It depends on how long people shed virus for, and like everything with this virus, that’s not simple. Some people shed for a long time even weeks, but others don’t.

Ten times worse than the flu
Austria has officially recorded 6,941 cases in total of which 337 have died. So the mortality rate for diagnosed cases is 5% and likely to rise due to the lag of one to two weeks (and even longer) before deaths occur. So the mortality rate of all infections (including asymptomatic) is more like 1.2%, making this at least ten times deadlier than the flu. (It may be worse if Austria was able to protect the 80+ and other vulnerable groups).

Hopefully new treatments will improve that.

We can see that testing around 1 – 6th April should give a realistic estimate of the scale of infections. Nose and throat swabs are probably a PCR test looking for two RNA segments unique to the virus. PCR means Polymerase Chain Reaction, where small amounts of DNA or RNA get amplified up so they can be tested.

Austria was among the early movers in Europe to try to contain the outbreak, clamping down on public life and enforcing social distancing when cases were still in the hundreds and few had died. The country will start to relax some of the measures next week, when small shops and hardware and gardening stores can reopen, but it will keep schools and other stores closed until May.

The only way to figure out the true rate of asymptomatic infections is with an antibody test (also known as a serum test), but that’s not possible yet, though many labs are reportedly close. These tests require a blood sample, but will hopefully show how many people were exposed to the virus, at least for a few months after the infection.


Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  Pendragon  
 
early birds
post Posted: Apr 13 2020, 03:07 PM
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https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/coronavirus/...&ocid=wispr


NSW's total number of COVID-19 cases reached 2854 on Sunday, after just seven new cases were diagnosed over 24 hours while testing dropped significantly over Easter.

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only 7 cases----because of less testing!!!!!!! i just hope if it is the case of normal testing and get just under 10 cases then to zero in few days

it isn't a wishful thinking at current rate isn't it??!!!



 
 


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