Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome To The ShareCafe Community - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Smart Investors - New Here? Click To Register >

987 Pages (Click to Jump) V  « < 978 979 980 981 982 983 984 > »    
 
  
Reply to this topic

BLT, BENITEC BIOPHARMA LIMITED
jarm
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 06:10 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 552
Thanks: 7


Dabbler, here is a release today showing the extension of their patent coverage - it is inexorable and the added licensing deals will put pressure on the sp once the market understands the technology's applications. As with all such stock I am slightly reticent to buy unless there is some upward trend but the current prices look ridiculously cheap. I'm not adding at present because of lack of available funds spent on other good prospects such as PTD. Maybe next month!

jarm



BENITEC SETTLES INFRINGEMENT LITIGATION AGAINST GENSCRIPT
WITH NON-EXCLUSIVE WORLDWIDE LICENSE TO MAKE AND SELL
ddRNAi PRODUCTS
BENITEC ANNOUNCES GRANT OF SECOND UK PATENT
24 August 2004
Benitec Ltd (ASX:BLT) today announced that it has settled its pending patent infringement case
against Genscript and as part of the settlement, Genscript has taken from Benitec a world-wide
non-exclusive license to make and sell DNA-directed RNAi (ddRNAi) based products. This
settlement completely resolves all claims asserted in the pending patent infringement dispute
between Benitec and Genscript that began when Benitec filed suit on March 22, 2004 in the U.S.
District Court for the District of Delaware, in the action styled Benitec Australia, Ltd. v.
Nucleonics, Inc., Ambion, Inc. and Genscript Corp., Civil Action No. 04-174-JJF. Financial
details of the settlement are confidential.

Benitec also announces the grant of its second UK patent related to DNA-directed RNAi
(ddRNAi) technology. Patent Ser. No. GB2377221, granted August 18, 2004, claims
compositions and methods for using ddRNAi expressed as hairpins in vertebrate animal cells.
Benitec's first UK patent, GB2353282, granted in June 2003, claims compositions and methods
using ddRNAi in vertebrate cells, tissues and organs generally. This brings the number of issued
patents in Benitec's patent estate to eight.
John McKinley, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Benitec Limited said, "I am pleased
that we have again been able to settle an infringement dispute by the granting of a non-exclusive
license to Genscript. Based upon our expanding issued ddRNAi patent estate, we are committed
through our licensing strategy to enable the widest use of ddRNAi in both products and research
licenses and to protect both Benitec and our ddRNAi licensees."



 
theadder
post Posted: Aug 24 2004, 03:37 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,264
Thanks: 1136


Brain Disease Blocker

08.24.04

Huntington's Disease is a devastating inherited disorder in which brain cells are genetically programmed to degenerate. The disease, which can cause dementia, memory loss, loss of movement control, and ultimately death, can strike people as young as 30; there is currently no cure. But now, genetics researchers at the University of Iowa have shown they can rescue mice from a disease similar to Huntington's using gene therapy.

Humans have two copies of most genes. Huntington's disease is one of several neurodegenerative diseases in which an error in the DNA code of just one copy of a gene causes the disease. While the normal gene tells brain cells how to build a needed protein, and the bad copy results in a toxic protein that kills brain cells.

Beverly Davidson, professor of internal medicine, physiology and biophysics, and neurology at the University of Iowa, and her group treated young mice with another dominant genetic neurodegenerative disease called spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). They reported in the journal Nature Medicine that they treated the mice with a technique called RNA interference, or RNAi, which uses small sequences of the genetic material RNA designed to block the cell's machinery from making a protein encoded by a specific gene—in this case, halting the production of the toxic protein. The researchers used a harmless virus to carry the RNA into brain cells.


"This is the first time that RNA interference has been accomplished in living tissues within animals that have a degenerative brain disease," says Davidson. And the results were promising—the mice with the SCA1 gene that received the gene therapy had normal coordination and movement. "The mice are much better," she says. "The mice appear almost as if they've had no disease. We've been able to essentially halt the disease from progressing from the initiation of the therapy." In contrast, in the mice with the SCA1 gene that were not treated, the disease progressed, causing lost brain cells and movement problems.

"The first reaction I had when I saw that we could improve the behavior in these mice was, 'Wow!'" says Davidson. "It was almost unbelievable—how could the simple methods that we were using lead to such a profound impact on the disease in these mice?"

Davidson also found that the RNA interference itself doesn't seem to be toxic to normal brain cells. She is optimistic about RNAi's potential to treat neurological diseases like SCA1 and Huntington's in humans. According to the researchers, the same technique could also apply to other neurodegenerative disorders that could be halted by inhibiting production of a mutated (or "toxic") protein, such as Alzheimer's Disease.

"A year ago the challenge was how do we move from accomplishing this in cells in a dish to accomplishing this in cells in the brain, and it's delightful that we're there, we've done it," says Davidson. "The question now is how do we move it from a little bitty brain the size of the mouse brain, into human therapies. And that's the next challenge."




 
thedabbler
post Posted: Aug 23 2004, 02:21 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 90


Thanks jarm!

Interesting, what are your thoughts on buying more at this time?



 
jarm
post Posted: Aug 23 2004, 02:11 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 552
Thanks: 7


Dabbler, perhaps this article from Stuart Roberts at SCE helps explain the current doldrum.

jarm

The Sydney-based artist Ken Done has been a recent buyer of shares in the gene silencing technology developer BLT. Done bought around 38,000 shares in late July at an average 83 cents a share. Unfortunately for Done, Benitec stock has performed poorly since these purchases were made, in no small measure because some stock came out of escrow earlier this month and that stock now seems to be coming on to the market. Which takes the shine off what continues to be a good story from a technology development angle. We last covered Benitec on 21 May when we looked at the recent acquisition of the California-based Avocel, which significantly boosted the Brisbane company's pipeline of gene silencing-based therapeutics and markedly added to the its talent pool. We remain optimistic that Benitec will deliver quite handsomely on its commercial promise in the medium term, and for that reason Benitec remains a Speculative Buy for Knowledgeable Professional Investors.

 
thedabbler
post Posted: Aug 20 2004, 11:24 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 90


Dont know why this company keeps going down wacko.gif

 
theadder
post Posted: Aug 20 2004, 11:31 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,264
Thanks: 1136


Collaboration eyes systemic RNAi delivery

http://www.inpharma.com/news/news-NG.asp?id=54241


19/08/2004 - The potential to use a phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi) to selectively switch off genes associated with disease has captured the attention of drug developers, but as with antisense before it, delivering the agents is the main obstacle.

And just like antisense, the first drug to enter trials based on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sequences – from Acuity Pharmaceuticals - is for an eye disease. This simplifies dosing because the candidate can be delivered by a relatively simple injection into the eyeball.
Delivering nucleic acid-based drugs successfully to internal tissues is a tougher challenge, and one which a collaboration between US company Nucleonics and German drug delivery specialist Novosom hopes to overcome.

RNAi relies on the use of short nucleic acid sequences that bind to and inactivate the machinery in the cell that leads to protein transcription – a process known as post-transcriptional gene silencing.

Nucleonics focuses on the development of expressed RNA interference-based (eiRNA) therapeutics, a variation on the technology whereby plasmid DNA coding for relevant dsRNA is inserted into targeted cells, letting the cells produce and deliver the sequences themselves. Cellular mechanisms then cleave the dsRNA into specifically encoded siRNAs (short interfering RNA), which silence the targeted genes.

Meanwhile, Novosom has developed a formulation technology under the Smarticles banner that has been shown to deliver nucleic acid sequences into cells effectively. The two companies hope to combine their resources to develop new treatments for the liver diseases hepatitis B and C.

"Delivering DNA to cells presents a considerable challenge, and Novosom has demonstrated that they can deliver DNA and other nucleic acids to liver cells with great efficiency," said Dr C Satishchandran, Nucleonics' co-founder and senior vice president, research and development.

Novosom’s technology is based on lipid particles (liposomes), a vehicle used to deliver drugs with poor bioavailability – such as the antifungal amphotericin B and cancer drug doxorubicin - for many years.

Like conventional liposomes, Novosom’s Smarticles are stable in blood and distribute in the same manner, but they have one fundamental difference. They become positively charged when they cross cell membranes, leading to effective delivery of their cargo within cells. The liver and spleen, along with sites of inflammation and tumours, are primary targets for the charged liposomes.

For Nucleonics, Novosom’s technology will be used in a second-generation product, as it already has a lead drug candidate for hep B in the build-up to clinical trials that is based on an in-house delivery system. But Dr Satishchandran believes Novosom’s approach is potentially more efficient.

Nucleonics has taken an option to exclusively license and commercialise Novosom's delivery technology for Nucleonics' eiRNA therapeutics for hep B and C, but financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.



 


jarm
post Posted: Aug 18 2004, 04:25 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 552
Thanks: 7


Further RNAi applications of interest to BLT in the field of neurodegenerative diseases

jarm



Sirna Therapeutics' Collaborator Publishes a Study on RNAi Technology Targeting Neurodegenerative Diseases 08/16/04

Sirna Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq: RNAI) today announced the publication of preclinical studies evaluating RNA interference-based therapies for a class of inherited neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) in the current issue of Nature Medicine. In a study led by Dr. Beverly Davidson, Roy J. Carver Chair in Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa, expression of a gene responsible for a disease mimicking the human neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1) was efficiently inhibited by RNA interference technology in a mouse model of the disease. SCA1, like Huntington's Disease, is a member of a family of devastating neurological diseases known as polyglutamine diseases that strike most often in midlife, causing progressive and unrelenting physical and mental deterioration.

Mice with the SCA1 disease gene treated with RNAi-based compounds had normal movement and coordination. The RNAi treatment also protected brain cells from the destruction normally caused by the disease and prevented the build-up of protein clumps within the cells. In contrast, untreated mice developed movement problems and lost brain cells in a manner similar to humans with this condition. The study, conducted by scientists at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and colleagues at the University of Minnesota and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), appeared in the August issue of Nature Medicine (Volume 10, pp 816, August 2004). This seminal work of Dr. Davidson and her colleagues will be important for the future development of RNAi-based therapeutics against this and other related neurological conditions such as Huntington's, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's Diseases.

Sirna Therapeutics has exclusively licensed key patents from the University of Iowa Research Foundation for the use of RNAi technology in the field of neurological diseases, including those relating to SCA1, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases. These patents complement Sirna's broad RNAi portfolio covering the basic RNAi technology, chemical modifications, therapeutic targets, delivery and manufacturing of RNA. Dr. Davidson has also joined Sirna's Scientific Advisory Board, comprised of leading researchers and clinicians in ophthalmic, oncology, neurodegenerative and infectious diseases.

Howard Robin, Sirna's President and Chief Executive Officer, commented, "Dr. Davidson's groundbreaking work demonstrates the promise of RNAi-based therapies for degenerative CNS diseases. Sirna is actively supporting Dr. Davidson's research in the field and is evaluating several RNAi-based compounds in our preclinical research program."

About RNA Interference

Sirna Therapeutics is using its proprietary technology and expertise in nucleic acids to develop a new class of nucleic acid-based therapeutics involving RNA interference. RNAi is a mechanism used by cells to regulate the expression of genes and replication of viruses. The RNA interference mechanism uses short interfering RNA (siRNA) to induce the destruction of target RNA using naturally occurring cellular protein machinery. Harnessing the natural phenomenon of RNAi holds potential for the development of a new class of drugs with specificity towards a wide range of diseases that result from undesirable protein production or viral replication.



 
jarm
post Posted: Aug 17 2004, 02:41 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 552
Thanks: 7


Now with banker/underwriters appointed in the US the move to list on the NASDAQ is imminent. SP should respond favourably as they clearly appear to be on track.

jarm

 
jarm
post Posted: Aug 12 2004, 08:12 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 552
Thanks: 7


You are right again Coop. The escrow shares will tell the story. A few doubters were shaken out with the news but not many. I met these people several times and they certainly infuse confidence and appear well and truly entrenched for the long haul - true believers all. Have a look at www.promega.com/ddrnai as an example of the growing coverage of the licensed technology turning up in increasingly routine offerings. All this will flow back in royalties. Science is not a strong point in Australian financial circles so there are several opportunities open for those prepared to do the leg work. AGT was another nice little performer earlier this year. A handsome return for minimal effort. Don't ignore the looming increase in PTD either.

jarm

 
AgentCooper
post Posted: Aug 11 2004, 09:40 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,475
Thanks: 34


I concur with your sentiments.

My view is that should things develop as you envisage, that we won't see a slow up tick in the share price rather, it will just go into a quiet trading halt one day and come out of it 100% higher ala Catuity in 1999, Securenet last year etc etc.

The true believers in BLT are set, the broader public's attention is elsewhere and (hopefully) the BLT management simply get on with the business of running a business.

Although, the release of shares from escrow (announced today) will test my theory! smile.gif


Coop

 
 


987 Pages (Click to Jump) V  « < 978 979 980 981 982 983 984 > » 

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING