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CGS, COGSTATE LTD
nipper
post Posted: Jun 8 2021, 01:52 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jul 17 2017, 06:21 PM

I followed CGS for a while, but its success always seemed dependent on that of others... Well, that day has arrived
QUOTE
Eisai Co., Ltd (Japan) and their development partner, Biogen Inc, have announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Accelerated Approval for aducanumab (to be marketed as ADUHELMTM) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease..

The accelerated approval has been granted based on data from clinical trials demonstrating the effect of ADUHELM on reducing amyloid beta plaques, a biomarker that is reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit, in this case a reduction in clinical decline. Under the accelerated approval conditions, which provide patients suffering from the disease earlier access to treatment, Biogen will conduct a controlled trial to verify the clinical benefit of ADUHELM in patients with Alzheimer's disease. If the trial fails to verify clinical benefit, the FDA may initiate proceedings to withdraw approval of the drug.

The approval by the FDA of ADUHELM is the first new treatment approved for Alzheimer's disease since 2003 and is the first approved therapy that targets the fundamental pathophysiology of the disease.

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, causing memory loss and other cognitive impairment that interfere with daily life. Measurement of cognition is a critical component of a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. ...

and how does Cogstate fit in with this?
QUOTE
On 26 October 2020, Cogstate announced that it had entered into an agreement with Eisai Co., Ltd to grant Eisai rights to exclusively develop and distribute Cogstate digital cognitive assessment technologies in healthcare and other markets worldwide. The agreement specifically excluded the Clinical Trials market, where Cogstate continues to market its offering independently.

Under the 10-year agreement between Eisai and Cogstate executed on 26 October 2020, Eisai had a right to terminate the agreement after year five under certain conditions. Following the approval of ADUHELM by the FDA, Eisai no longer have that right to accelerated termination of the Cogstate / Eisai agreement. Therefore, in addition to the minimum contractual royalty payments over commercial years 1 to 5 of US$10 million, Eisai are now also contractually obliged to make the minimum royalty payments to Cogstate over commercial years 6 to 10, being an additional aggregate payment of US$20 million over that period.

up 50%




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jul 17 2017, 06:21 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 30 2017, 08:58 AM

QUOTE
Getting divorced, losing a parent or being fired can age the brain by four years, a study suggests. One stressful event .. could increase the risk of dementia, according to data suggesting that life's serious misfortunes could have knock-on effects decades later.
Efforts to cushion the blow of bereavement, abuse or other traumatic events could help to protect the brain, experts speculated.

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin looked at 1,320 adults with an average age of 58 to study how stressful life events, ranging from serious illness to imprisonment, affected the brain. Those who had more such problems scored worse on cognitive tests, scientists told the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London this July.

Megan Zuelsdorrff, who led the research, said the effect was particularly pronounced in the black people she studied, who tended to have suffered more, calculating that, for them, "adverse events across the lifespan predict cognitive function more strongly than established risk factors including age, education and the APOE-e4 Alzheimer's risk gene".

Maria Carrillo, chief scientific officer at the Alzheimer's Association, a Chicago-based not-for-profit organisation, said that "each stressful situation amounts to about four years of cognitive ageing", pointing out these could happen at any time in life. "Things like death of a parent, abuse, loss of a job, loss of a home, so it's a variety of different things that you imagine would be stressful. A change of school for some children could even be quite stressful," she said. "Brain health should be thought of as a life course issue, not just in later or midlife. We have to start thinking about brain health at birth, if not before."

Exactly how stress damages the brain is not clear, but the tissue inflammation it is known to cause is thought to be the most likely explanation. Chronic inflammation can cause damage over time, while also perhaps making the brain more vulnerable to later illness. Depression brought on by serious life problems could also contribute, as it is known to be linked to dementia.

Carol Routledge, director of research at the charity Alzheimer's Research UK, said: "Our brains are incredibly intricate organs that show enormous resilience to keep us ticking every day. Stressful life events can turn our lives upside down for a time and though most people can eventually return to an even keel, we can't be sure how psychological stress could impact the workings of the brain over time ... There is a growing realisation that events and experiences throughout life can impact the brain decades later and researchers must take a whole lifespan approach to understanding brain health in later life."

Doug Brown, of the Alzheimer's Society research charity, said: "We know that prolonged stress can have an impact on our health, so it's no surprise that this study indicates stressful life events may also affect our memory and thinking abilities later in life. However, it remains to be established whether these stressful life events can lead to an increased risk of dementia."

- The Times



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 30 2017, 08:58 AM
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INVESTMENT HIGHLIGHTS
QUOTE
 Cogstate is at a major inflection point as it accelerates the commercialisation of 15+ years of world-class research and development
 Record revenue growth translating into positive EBIT and strong cash flow generation
 Growing US$800m market opportunity for Clinical Trials division – new commercial leadership and team driving step-change in revenue and earnings growth
 Opportunity to establish market leadership in Healthcare, potentially an even larger market than Clinical Trials – clear milestones in place to rapidly exploit this potential
 Strong contracted revenue pipeline and positive outlook de-risks investment proposition and leads to high confidence in medium to long term growth trajectory

bottom drawer



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 24 2016, 09:47 AM
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QUOTE
The pursuit of a treatment for Alzheimer's disease has long focused on clearing clumps of a protein called beta amyloid that build up in the brain of those with the mind-robbing condition.

But the failure of Eli Lilly & Co.'s experimental amyloid buster is the latest indication that targeting amyloid is far from straightforward. Other treatments that target these so-called plaques have proven disappointing. Lilly said on Wednesday that it wouldn't seek regulatory approval to market its experimental medication, known as solanezumab, for mild dementia, because it didn't significantly slow down cognitive decline in patients with early disease.

University of Texas Medical Branch neuroscientist Rakez Kayed said going after plaques alone probably isn't the best strategy generally. Combination therapies targeting several Alzheimer's-related proteins, including another called tau, might be more fruitful. Tau can form tangles that are toxic to brain cells.

Companies, including Johnson & Johnson, Roche Holding AG, Bristol-Meyers Squib Co. and AbbVie Inc., are developing drugs that target tau. In July, an experimental drug developed by TauRX Pharmaceuticals Ltd. failed to provide cognitive benefits. It was the first tau-related therapy to make it to late-stage testing in humans.

Scientists also think treating the disease earlier before the start of symptoms — like memory loss and cognitive impairment — will be key. That was the basis of the most recent Lilly trial.
Cogstate CGS is down and of some 15% in last few days. As a multi-faceted cognitive assessment and training company focused on the development and commercialisation of rapid, computerised tests of cognition (brain function), I guess some correlation would exist ... if no end use, then why do the early assessment.

All very challenging for what is emerging as a major issue, as the view is: "Scientists also think treating the disease earlier before the start of symptoms — like memory loss and cognitive impairment — will be key"



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Oct 24 2016, 09:14 AM
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QUOTE
The singular transformation of the 20th century was the near-doubling of life spans in the West. Longer life spans are a good thing, of course, but there is a snake in the garden.

Diseases like smallpox and tuberculosis that once were common and life-threatening nearly vanished in the 20th century West. Antibiotics turned once-fatal diseases into treatable maladies. Even the old killers, heart disease and cancer, started declining, thanks to new therapeutics. People began to live much longer lives. As a result, the incidence of Alzheimer's increased, as did the level of horror it inflicts.

Not only does a formerly healthy individual lose memory and self when hit by AD, the lives of entire families are consumed by the slow devastation of a loved one.

Alzheimer's patients first lose the ability to remember little things. Eventually they become delusional and forget those who love them and whom they once loved. Next, they lose motor function, moving very much like zombies, and, finally, they die, having drained the people who cared for them.

Unless your family has suffered this directly, you may not know that most AD victims reach a stage marked by hostility and anger. Nearly half of all Alzheimer's patients assault the people around them with hitting, scratching, grappling, and biting. Sufferers of Alzheimer's disease literally turn into the aggressive zombies of George Romero.

Though AD is only the sixth-leading cause of mortality, it is the [USA's] most expensive disease, due to the many years of disabled survival it allows the patient. Despite medical progress in most other areas, Alzheimer's and its costs continue to grow as the population ages. The zombie plague is spreading.

The numbers point to a disaster that will be the real zombie apocalypse. Western societies simply won't be able to bear the costs of Alzheimer's as the incidence continues to rise. Faced with impossible financial, emotional, and psychological costs, we would have to funnel so much of our resources into the care of Alzheimer's patients that the quality of life for everyone would plummet.

Escape from the zombie apocalypse, on the other hand, is entirely simple: cure aging itself. To be more precise, the solution to Alzheimer's is to stop accelerated aging. We need to slow the degeneration that leads to Alzheimer's and other age-related disease.

from a book called The Methuselah Effect.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Oct 17 2016, 11:38 AM
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BUSINESS OUTLOOK

• Positive EBIT expected for H1 FY17, based on strong Q1 performance
– September quarter sales results reinforces the exciting growth profile
– Strong backlog of contracted future revenue provides visibility into revenue growth for FY17

• Guidance in respect of the full year will be provided following the release of the half year financial statements

• To further pursue of the growing market opportunity for Cogstate’s products and services, the company will invest in the expansion of the senior management team

SP over $1.00 on today's update. One for the longer term ..... as long as I remember it's in the bottom drawer



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


nipper
post Posted: Mar 5 2016, 01:53 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jun 13 2015, 04:03 PM

Cogstate CGS gets a mention in the weekend paper

Biotech player CogState has plenty of credibility behind it
  • Tim Boreham; The Australian
QUOTE
A specialist in cognitive assessment, CogState wins plenty of free headlines during the AFL and NRL footy season as the concussion tester of choice for most clubs.

But testing groggy footballers is only a peripheral part of the business of CogState, which derives most of its revenue from the testing component of pharmaceutical company clinical trials.

Not surprisingly, Alzheimer's disease research accounts for 45 per cent of CogState's contracted trial revenue.

While the biotech sector is notoriously fickle, CogState has provided a memorable experience for its heavyweight blue-blood backers, including Myer family scion Martyn Myer and serial director Charles Goode. Last year, neurosciences boffin Alan Finkel took a $2 million placement before becoming the country's chief scientist.

If all of that doesn't imbue the register with enough cred, David Dolby (of sound system fame) has built a 19.5 per cent stake. The link here is that Dolby (or, for Spinal Tap fans, Dobly) founder Ray Dolby died from Alzheimer's in 2013.

CogState last week reported $13m of revenue for the first half, up 91 per cent, with net earnings of $2.6m compared with a $2.7m loss previously.

CogState's pharma clients include Johnson & Johnson, Eli Lily, Novartis and Pfizer, with the global "cognitive assessment and training" sector estimated at $US2.4 billion ($3.3bn).

Alzheimer's aside, O'Connor says there is a growing line of work for cancer drug developers that want to verify that, at the very least, their curative does not cause cognitive problems as a side effect (often known as chemo-fog). CogState also focuses on the side effect of drugs for paediatric use.

The company reports $23m of contracted revenue for the current year, with a $50m tender pipeline. "We won't win them all,'' says the pragmatic O'Connor.

In effect, CogState is an exposure to the booming business of Alzheimer's research without the huge risks of drug development. "We are linked to the conduct of the studies and not necessarily the success,'' O'Connor says.

While it's squarely on the radar of the monied men, CogState attracts no broker research coverage. Given this reflects CogState's lack of interest in raising further capital and thus lining brokers' pockets, it's not such a bad thing. Long-term buy.






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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jun 13 2015, 04:03 PM
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In Reply To: oracle's post @ Nov 12 2008, 12:34 PM

been a while since anyone visited Cogstate

Biotech analyst at Canaccord Genuity, Matthijs Smith, writes about the approvals process for Alzheimer's (and has a view CGS may have a better chance of pulling things off.)
QUOTE
For Alzheimer's Disease, Australia alone has 320,000 sufferers and that is expected to rise to 1 million by 2050. The medical costs of the disease are rising each year, and that does not include the cost of millions of hours of unpaid care provided by family members and friends. The human tragedy that is AD usually manifests first with evidence of cognitive impairment including memory loss, language difficulties and loss of abstract reasoning. It is usually diagnosed in patients in their 60s. A quarter of 85 year olds and half of 95 year olds develop the disease.

Not a single new drug for Alzheimer's has been approved in the past 10 years in USA, A MIT report - "Why Declining Investment in Basic Research Threatens a US Innovation Deficit" - states "basic questions remain unanswered: very little is known about what causes AD, how and when it begins, how it progresses and whether it can be slowed, arrested, or reversed".

Sadly, the world is littered with failed AD drug trials including several failed attempts by Eli Lilly. It is believed there have been more than a 100 clinical trial AD failures. However, Smith says the continuing boom in clinical trials provides growth opportunities for companies that can streamline the testing process.

A problem with AD is that once the patient is suffering from the disease it is too late for the drug treatment to assist. The earlier the cognitive impairment can be identified the better.

That leads Smith into recommending investors seriously consider an Australian listed company called Cogstate, which "optimises the measurement of cognition to guide decision making", in other words to help identification of suitable candidates in the prescreening.

CGS has just raised $2 million through a placement of shares to an entity controlled by Dr Alan Finkel, who has also being appointed a non-executive director of the company. Finkel is a long time investor in the company with extensive experience running a neuroscience-based technology company in the U.S. The funds were raised through a placement of 8 million shares priced at $0.25 each.

Cogstate expects to record positive EBITDA for the second half of financial year 2015, based on existing contracted revenue. At the end of April, the updated total value of clinical trials contracts signed FYTD was US$21.9 million. The company has forecast revenues of A$15.58 million from existing sales contracts for FY2015, a 46% growth on the previous year.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
oracle
post Posted: Nov 12 2008, 12:34 PM
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Fundamentals in place and now starting to break-up out of a good base around 15.

Management have confirmed profitability in current half and increasing demand for their services.

Looks to be past the tipping point and on its way.

Cheers



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oracle
 
oracle
post Posted: Sep 3 2008, 04:15 PM
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The Coggies have shown pretty good relative strength of late which makes me wonder whether it has finished going down. Not the same as ready to go up of course but the fundamentals are in place. Capital raising to shore up the balance sheet out of the way and an improving cashflow situation.
Cheap IF they can keep the recent sales momentum going. I think they can this time.

Cheers



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oracle
 
 


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