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NEWS PAPER OR MEDIA ARTICLES, ANYTHING INTERESTING
mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 11 2019, 07:58 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Apr 4 2019, 07:22 AM

Well, the end result is a bit underwhelming.





Looks like a fuzzy donut.
However, if we are being truly technically truthfull, it may not exist this morning, or could be extremely different from the photograph.
Given that the object is some 55 million light years away, the radiation used to create the image is some 55 million years old.

Mick




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Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  nipper  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Apr 4 2019, 07:22 AM
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I wonder if the MSM will see much importance in this announcement.

QUOTE
This could be the biggest announcement ever in the history of astronomy. Announcement and video follows.


Artist conception of what a photograph of the event horizon around a black hole may look like.
Of all the weird stuff that exists in the universe, such as quasars, pulsars, magnetars, neutron stars, red giants and white dwarfs, one of the most bizarre, and the “holy grail” for scientists to image, is the black hole. Black holes were first identified in Einstein’s theory of general relativity. These gravitational monsters create a gravity well so deep and so steep that they consume everything near them. The gravity is so intense that even light can’t escape. While science already knows quite a bit about black holes, and have posited that one exists at the center of our galaxy since the mid 1970s, there have never been any photographs of black holes. After all, how can you photograph something that sucks in all the light around it?

The answer? Look for the event horizon.

That lack of photography may be about to change on April 10th, 2019. From the EHT webpage:

The European Commission, European Research Council, and the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project will hold a press conference to present a groundbreaking result from the EHT.

EHT Webpage


While idly reading up on Event Horizons and black holes, I found the interesting tidbit that if the earth were to be compressed sufficiently so as to be about 9 centimetres in diameter, it would become a black hole.
Very useful info for our next trivial pursuit night.

Mick






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Said 'Thanks' for this post: triage  nipper  Pendragon  
 
nipper
post Posted: Mar 9 2019, 08:16 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Mar 8 2019, 09:49 PM

QUOTE
Depending on which side of the debate you listen to, franking credit refunds are either welfare for the wealthy or an antidote to double taxation.

But the most compelling argument against Labor's proposal is that it produces different outcomes for retirees in the same financial position, depending on how they choose to invest.
- indeed (or how they have chosen to arrive at the retirement position.)

Triage - the Keating reference reveals a lot. Super has been in place for decades now.... and with time, differing outcomes occur, depending on investment decisions that then compound over the years. Some are better off than others.

Personally, I found the generosity in the legislation hard to resist. After all Economics 101 states:" People respond to incentives". But against that, why is the desire to be off the govt tit to be slapped down? And how hard will it be in pension phase to replace evaporated cashflow.

Besides, intergenerational wealth transfer is only partial. Minimum drawdowns increase with age, and taxable components are taxed at 15% plus Medicare



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Mar 8 2019, 09:49 PM
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In Reply To: triage's post @ Mar 8 2019, 07:47 PM

I might have agreed with you if they got rid of all the refunds, but it is targeted at selffunded retirees.
The inustry and retail super funds will not lose out.
A purely political ploy.
Mick



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triage
post Posted: Mar 8 2019, 07:47 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Mar 8 2019, 06:48 PM

Because it is costing currrent taxpayers about $5b a year for starters. Because it is allowing lots of baby boomers to sit on their accumulated capital and live off "refunds" financed by current taxpayers rather than to gradually liquidate that accumulated capital. I actually spent time in the part of government that helped formulate superannunation policy in the Keating years and I don't recall that the purpose of superannuation was to allow people to retire, to live off the income from superannuation and hang on to the capital, and then pass it all on to the kids.



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early birds
post Posted: Mar 8 2019, 06:48 PM
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https://www.afr.com/personal-finance/tax/th...y_Sent=08032019

Is it a "retiree tax" grab or an end to "welfare for the wealthy"? Labor's pledge to make franking credits non-refundable has become one of the most hotly contested issues in Australia.

Depending on which side of politics you speak to, the proposal is either a massive tax grab (the Coalition) or the end of a loophole that benefits multimillionaires (Labor)
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i don't like to showing my political views, but to aim at franking credit .......poooooo, it is bit too low. thumbdown.gif

people working hard when they ware young and safe bit more to fund little better retired life ,,,,how on earth Labor will target this part........




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henrietta
post Posted: Mar 2 2019, 08:23 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Mar 1 2019, 02:33 PM

You have to be a bit careful with these venomous bites ........ bees, snakes ....... as the effect is usually cumulative, and the reaction gets worse each time you are bitten.
I remember Ram Chandra, venom collector, gradually deteriorating and eventually dying from numerous taipan ( and others ) bites.

Cheers
J

 
alonso
post Posted: Mar 1 2019, 02:35 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Mar 1 2019, 01:16 PM

My bro-in-law has twice been bitten by brown snakes (Cowra NSW). He almost didn't make it the second time.

And yet here I am, on a wooded acreage, and in 30 odd years I've only seen one small black snake.

(But maybe they've seen me)






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mullokintyre
post Posted: Mar 1 2019, 02:33 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Mar 1 2019, 01:34 PM

Its ok EB, it wasn't at the same time.
Up here in the GV, we have lots of snakes
I generally ignore them, but I ignored one too many when I stepped on it.
Gave me a nip through my socks. I saw the puncture marks and lgot my wife to mandage me up and headed for the hospital.
Spent a night in hospital feeling ordinary. But the doctors only give you anti venene if your breathing gets bad or lose consciousness.
They reckon the treatment can sometimes be worse than the bite.
I never got that bad that I needed anti venene, but geez I felt crook for a few days. Took me at least a week to get over it.
The redbacks are everywhere. The first time I got bitten, I dint even know about it till about an hour later.
I was shifting stuff to get an old pump out of the shed and must have left my fingers to close to one.
Fingers swelled up and was pretty sore, but nowhere near as bad as the snake bite.
Got other bites in subsequent years, but apart from swelling and redness, I got over them pretty quickly.
Mick



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early birds
post Posted: Mar 1 2019, 01:34 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Mar 1 2019, 01:16 PM

Having been bitten by both a brown snake and a red back
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wholly crap Mick! ohmy.gif you just made my whole body hair stand up.................zhzzzzzzz!!

hi draughtsman, your sound you are really know that place well..... lucky you!! tongue.gif

nipper
i've seen red back in my front and back yard{{kill them with spry}----it is little in size. i'm amazed how can it take a relatively large snake down........ {something like "dog bites man"]



 
 


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