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AMC, AMCOR LIMITED
blacksheep
post Posted: Mar 5 2019, 08:53 PM
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According to Michael West article - https://www.michaelwest.com.au/companies/ta...r-limited-2019/
QUOTE
Amcor switched head office from Australia to Switzerland three years ago, a move which is emblematic of the group’s approach to paying tax.

The packaging giant recorded $11.7 billion in total income over the four years of available Tax Office transparency data. It managed to eliminate most of that in costs, which left just $35 million in taxable income on which no tax was paid – a tax rate of zero


If true, that's a shame considering their "Australian Heritage"
QUOTE
1860s Australian Heritage
Amcor's history dates back to the 1860s when Samuel Ramsden, a young stone mason from Yorkshire, arrived in Australia with his bride to seek his fortune in a new land. He established Victoria's first paper mill on the banks of the Yarra River in Melbourne.

For most of its life the company was known as APM - Australian Paper Manufacturers and its products even then touched the daily lives of all Australians.

The pictures above are, from left to right:

Samuel Ramsden, Founder of the company.
Botany Paper Mill, Circa 1900.
Amcor was the first company to collect paper for recycling with a horse and cart.
The former Australian Paper Manufacturer's logo and letterhead.
In the 1970s and 1980s the company added a range of diverse packaging interests to its traditional papermaking activities. This was achieved through creating new business partnerships and making strategic acquisitions in order to expand and diversify the company’s activities. With the focus gradually changing and as the company moved towards the future, the company name did not quite fit with the new focus of this young, energetic Australian company. It was decided that the company name should be changed.

On May 1, 1986 APM became Amcor Limited, a name that has become increasingly well known throughout the world for its packaging innovation and its global reach.

Amcor - a Global Leader in Packaging
Today, Amcor deploys its global packaging expertise and knowledge of customer packing and supply chains to produce packaging that is more functional, appealing, and cost effective for customers and their consumers, and more sustainable for the environment. Amcor continues to focus on value - creating acquisitions that expand our presence in emerging markets, improve the industry structure (primarily in developed markets), and add new technologies so that we can capture further value.


https://www.shortman.com.au/stock?q=amc
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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 8 2018, 12:09 PM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Nov 3 2017, 02:07 PM

Market not impressed with the "strategic combination" of AMC and Bemis announcement on Monday

SP prior to ann $15.28 - SP currently $14.10

Shorts have also piled in - notable short alert yesterday

QUOTE
Tue 7th Aug, 2018 11,281,249 1,158,141,276 0.97% 16,889,037 66.80%

https://www.shortman.com.au/stock?q=AMC

Amcor breaks Buffett's golden rule
QUOTE
A $175 million break fee is in place to stop anyone gatecrashing the Amcor-Bemis $9 billion tie-up as analysts worry about Amcor breaking one of Warren Buffett's cardinal investment rules.

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--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 3 2017, 02:07 PM
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Massive sell off after the MD's address at recent AGM, wherein he made these comments (below) on difficult 1st Q trading
Seems one insitution seller sold down 1.3% of their holding @ $14.80/share through UBS.

Might bounce back after hitting that $14.80 mark

QUOTE
First, parts of our business have had a good start to the year but overall it has been a difficult
first quarter. In our outlook statements in August, we made some cautionary comments related
to market conditions, customer performance and raw materials costs, and these issues have
continued or worsened through the September quarter, especially in emerging markets.

These industry challenges are not Amcor specific, however we are advantaged in addressing
them given our global footprint, industry leadership positions and execution capabilities. So the
second key message is that we have taken the appropriate actions and moved quickly and
decisively in response. As a result, we have already implemented actions to flex capacity,
increase prices and reduce costs. Our management teams are focused on what needs to be
done to minimise the adverse impacts from the current market conditions and they are
executing well.

And the third message, and most importantly, as a result of the actions we are taking,
notwithstanding a more cautious outlook, we continue to expect ‘Profit after Tax’ (PAT) growth
in constant currency terms for the 2017/18 financial year will be within the range of outcomes
we expected in August. The magnitude of overall earnings growth will depend on trading
conditions across the balance of the year and assumes some improvement relative to the
September quarter.


Shorters were active on/after
Wed 1st Nov, 2017 2,028,566 1,158,141,276 0.17% 8,884,390 22.83%
Tue 31st Oct, 2017 322,065 1,158,141,276 0.02% 2,514,533 12.81%
https://www.shortman.com.au/stock?q=amc
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--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jul 25 2017, 05:40 PM
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Everyone involved is suing everyone - lawyers, no doubt, are the only happy chappies lmaosmiley.gif

Alphington must wait for ‘Tesla town’ as dispute over asbestos clean-up escalates
JULY 25 2017 - 1:58PM

QUOTE
It's billed as a "Tesla town" – a $2 billion eco-development set to grace the banks of the Yarra in Alphington.

But the building of this new, solar-powered suburb could be delayed by what's shaping up to be a protracted Supreme Court legal dispute over an asbestos clean-up that could cost more than $40 million.


QUOTE
When it agreed to buy the land from Amcor, Glenvill knew there was asbestos at the site.

But the developer claims Amcor didn't reveal the extent of it, and is now suing the company.

Amcor, though, is pointing the finger at its environmental engineer and is counter-suing them for not detecting all the asbestos.




http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/alphingt...724-gxhlp9.html



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 25 2016, 10:15 PM
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Amcor Limited (AMC) reported underlying NPAT of US$671.1m for FY16, up 7.5% on a constant currency basis.

Management said growth was solid in both developed and emerging markets, there was a mix of growth from organic sources and from acquisitions and both the flexibles and rigid plastics segments achieved higher results than the same period last year.

EPS increased 11.3% (constant currency), benefiting from profit growth and the US$500m share buy-back completed during the period.



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 15 2016, 02:35 PM
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Orora (ORA) shares have almost tripled since the December 2013 separation from Amcor ... in this case, the demerger resulted in one plus one equalling more than two. Management is freed up to specialise on core competencies, rather than being reated as the annoying little other bit.. ..

Headline profit of $168million was 28% higher than last year and comfortably exceeded analyst expectations of around $159m.

CEO Nigel Garrard cites increased box demand from the agri sector, especially NZ kiwifruit and apple growers.

Underpinned by its biggest client Treasury Wine Estates, the Gawler bottle plant can't keep up with demand and is to undergo a $42m expansion to lift annual output capacity to 60 million bottles.

Orora is also overcoming mounting input cost pressures, notably electricity costs in SA where its bottle plant is located. Across the board, electricity and gas costs are growing in the double digits, with power costs "north of 20 per cent".

While expiring power contracts have had to be rewritten at unfavourable prices, low inflation means there has been reduced scope to pass on the burden to customers. Clients are on notice that this will change, although there's some relief with lower aluminium and resin costs.

ORA acquired Texan retail display house IntegraColor for $100m in March; expect some more bolt-ons in the US.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


nipper
post Posted: Feb 18 2013, 08:49 AM
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QUOTE
Citi rates AMC as Buy - The broker notes the company is set to buy AGI-Shorewood's tobacco packaging operations for US$115m. Citi likes the look of the price paid and the emerging market exposure, especially to South Korea, Mexico and China.

Making the deal look even sweeter is the broker's assessment that there are around $13m in synergies to be extracted, which has Citi thinking the deal is both returns and earnings accretive.

estimated dividend yield is 4.50%; estimated Price to Earnings Ratio (PER) is 15.80.

Target price is $9.15.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
early birds
post Posted: Oct 5 2012, 12:27 PM
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atop of $8, and i am not on with it. sadsmiley02.gif one for the chartist to chase it now!!

lower AUD really helps!



 
nipper
post Posted: Aug 23 2012, 09:02 AM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Jul 17 2012, 02:13 PM

QUOTE
Amcor reported a FY12 underlying NPAT of A$635 mn (vs GS A$621mn). After adjusting for significant items of -A$222mn (after tax), the statutory result was A$413mn. Final dividend was 19.0¢ (vs GS est A18.0¢).

Key takeouts from the result
FY12 result slightly better than we expected: NPAT Adj of A$635m was 2% ahead of our estimate, driven by slightly stronger EBIT (largely due to a better Flexibles result), as well as lower interest and tax expense.

No group FY13 guidance: However, AMC noted that it expects a solid increase in Flexibles earnings in local currency terms, Rigid Plastics earnings to be moderately higher in local currency terms, and Australasia & Distribution earnings to be ''in line'' with FY12.

Strong FCF generation: In future periods, AMC expects to generate upwards of A$400mn in FCF pa which it may look to leverage and deploy via: 1) acquisitions, 2) internal investment opportunities, and/or 3) return to shareholders.

Implications
Retain Neutral. While today's result highlights AMC's defensive qualities, based on our revised target price, its valuation upside is limited relative to a number of its industrial peers (prospective return 14%).

Our EPS revisions are -3% in FY13, -5% in FY14, and -5% in FY15. Changes largely reflect weaker margin assumptions (particularly for the Rigid Plastics business), and the latest GS currency estimates.

Valuation
Our 12-month target price has increased to A$8.32 (from A$8.09). We have rolled forward our P/E based target multiple to FY14, and maintained the target multiple at 14x (AMC's long run average).

Key risks - Upside/downside: Lower/higher AUD, stronger/weaker margins.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
early birds
post Posted: Jul 17 2012, 02:13 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Jul 10 2012, 03:02 PM

$7.50 again, woun't surprise me to see $7.70 running into earning call for this one,
really thought it should make all time high this year, but so much doubt after lacklust move last few months.
still chance though! tongue.gif

 
 


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