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AVR, AVATAR INDUSTRIES LIMITED
alcro1
post Posted: Jul 28 2008, 09:30 PM
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In reply to: tas on Thursday 24/07/08 11:50am

I got hold of a phone number for Lednium from Computershare and rang them today. Interestingly the receptionist answered the phone stating "hullo, Avatar industries". She put me on to a guy who's name I did not catch. When asked what was happening with Lednium, he basically indicated it was going nowhere as they were in a patent dispute with a multinational, but had no resources to fight it with. I said "so we wait and hope then?" His reply was "hope is about all there is". I think the share certificate we got is pretty much worthless. At least we got paid out for Avatar, but it is interesting it is still in existence in some form. Hope this helps in some way.

 
tas
post Posted: Jul 24 2008, 11:50 AM
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In reply to: scoot on Wednesday 23/07/08 08:28pm

They have not sent me any information other than the share certificate. I don't have any contact details for the company to ring and ask what they are up to.

There was article in press at the weekend about an Australian company (not Lednium) that has developed a new way of producing leds that reduces the cost by 50%.

 
scoot
post Posted: Jul 23 2008, 08:28 PM
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In reply to: carneius on Wednesday 02/05/07 01:37pm

anyone know what becoome of the float of lednium?

 
carneius
post Posted: May 2 2007, 11:37 AM
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In reply to: dee27 on Thursday 28/12/06 10:42am

Hi dee

Lednium may end up being worth something!!

http://www.lednium.com/pdf/blue%202007%20presentation.pdf

Not sure what the Yarra valley and wine has to do with any of this but what the hell

ATB

C

 
dee27
post Posted: Dec 28 2006, 12:42 PM
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In reply to: boba on Thursday 28/12/06 01:26pm

Hi boba,

seem to be in a holding pattern till the board tell us how they're going to return the money from the Drillcorp sale. Given that they're getting about $1.70 per share and most of that can be written off for tax purposes against previous losses, the market seems to be giving no value to the remaining businesses (Lednium and Arlec).

I've sold half of what I had, but am holding the rest to see what happens next as I think Lednium especially has a bright future (please excuse the pun). I'd be interested to hear what you and Carneius think ???

Cheers D.



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From little things big things grow.
 
boba
post Posted: Dec 28 2006, 12:26 PM
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In reply to: carneius on Thursday 05/10/06 09:08am

To Carneius, Dee or any other interested posters,

1st post, held avr for some time , no readily available info about, any insights out there re future prospects etc ? would be greatly apptreciated,
boba

 

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carneius
post Posted: Oct 5 2006, 09:08 AM
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QUOTE (dee27 @ Monday 11/09/06 06:27am)

Hi Dee

Sorry about delay in reply,I`ve been away as you probably know.Lednium could be a good business for AVR.Good article.
Have a look at the lednium website to get an idea as to how it is developing.Products developed and in development is impressive.

http://www.lednium.com/applications4.htm


ATB

C

 
dee27
post Posted: Sep 11 2006, 08:27 AM
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Hi Carneius,
Copied from the future inventions thread. Looks like LEDS will be huge in the future.

"It is estimated that it is possible to alleviate the need for 133 nuclear power stations in the US by the year 2025 if white solid-state lighting is implemented"

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/5328586.stm

Last Updated: Friday, 8 September 2006, 23:47 GMT 00:47 UK
Shedding light on the world
By Jane Qui
Helsinki

The 2006 Millennium Technology Prize has been awarded to Professor Shuji Nakamura, the inventor who is said to have kicked started the "blue laser revolution".

Professor Nakamura stunned the world more than 10 years ago with his inventions of light-emitting semiconductors: blue, green and white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and the blue laser diode.

Blue light has since opened up many opportunities. For example, blue LEDs are used in full-colour flat-screen displays, while blue lasers will change the face of information technology, some say.

The 1m Euro (£680,000) prize, presented by the Finnish President Tarja Halonen, recognised these developments.

As the world's largest technology award, the Millennium Technology Prize awards outstanding achievement aimed at promoting the quality of life and sustainable development.

"Professor Nakamura's technological innovations in the field of semiconductor materials and devices are groundbreaking," said Jaakko Ihamuotila, chairman of the Millennium Prize Foundation.

Blue beams

Increasingly, computers and communications are relying on light to send, store and process information. Devices that work with light are much faster and can store more data.

Lasers are key components of many of these devices. CD, DVD players, and storage systems all utilise these intense focused beams of light.

But all lasers are not equals.

The shorter the wavelength of the laser's light, the smaller the width of the focused beam. As the beam is responsible for reading and writing data onto a disc, for example; the smaller it is, the more densely packed the data can be.

Professor Nakamura's breakthrough was in developing a blue laser source.

This has a shorter wavelength than its infrared and red equivalent (the common light sources used in today's standard DVD and CD players, for example), and so it represents a big step forward in storage capacity.

Going from infrared to blue quadruples the amount of data that can be stored in a given area.

Currently, companies such as Sony, Toshiba and Samsung are exploiting Professor Nakamura's invention in the next generation of DVD players, which promise better sound and high-definition pictures.

Light advance

Professor Nakamura's inventions are also starting to have an impact on another industry.

His white LEDs combine blue, green and red LEDs, and could one day revolutionise the lighting industry.

Some already compare the developments made possible by Professor Nakamura with those of Thomas Edison, the inventor of the tungsten lightbulb.

A light using the LEDs, known as a solid-state light, consumes just four watts of electricity to produce as much light as a 60-watt incandescent lightbulb.

"It is estimated that it is possible to alleviate the need for 133 nuclear power stations in the US by the year 2025 if white solid-state lighting is implemented," said Professor Nakamura.

Bulbs using Nakamura's semiconductor materials are now widely used in traffic lights around the world. They are expected to last over 10 years, whereas conventional bulbs last just 6 months.

World illumination

The power savings could be huge. Currently, keeping the UK's traffic lights running with conventional bulbs requires the equivalent energy of two medium-sized power stations.

The new light sources are also ideally suited to run off solar power and are therefore ideal for use in remote areas of developing countries.

Professor Nakamura hopes that as a result of his work there will be light in parts of the world where today there is not even electricity.

"The University of California has a motto: let there be light," said Professor Nakamura. "It could also serve as a motto for my own research."

He plans to donate part of the prize to organisations that help to implement solid-state lighting in developing countries, such as the Light Up The World Foundation or Engineering Without Borders.

But the benefits of his LEDs are not just restricted to high-tech gadgets and bringing light to the world.

The blue LED's ultraviolet properties could also provide a cheap and efficient way to clean water or counter pollution.

"Professor Nakamura's work is making important contributions toward improving the quality of life and the health of our planet," said Henry T Yang, the chancellor of the University of California at Santa Barbara.



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From little things big things grow.
 
RADIO
post Posted: Sep 5 2006, 01:54 PM
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user posted image

Recent ShareScene.com Radio Broadcast (Thu, 24 Aug 2006 12:30PM):

Sale of Mineral Drilling Business Mr Paul Favretto, Managing Director

N.B. ShareScene.com Radio can normally be accessed by the 'RADIO' link, top of every page.

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ShareScene.com Radio delivers investor presentations from ASX listed companies. Keep up to date with the latest corporate dealings of the shares you follow. Hear news direct from the source. Listen to directors and investor relations mangers discuss their company, give investor updates and brief on current results. ShareScene.com Radio keeps you informed about company announcements and events, and provides you daily market wraps and industry discussions.
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carneius
post Posted: Aug 21 2006, 08:02 PM
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In reply to: dee27 on Monday 21/08/06 05:20pm

Hi Dee

The lednium spinoff crossed my mind,emerging technology,strong partnership,etc etc,if you can make iron ore sexy shouldn`t be too hard to make the next generation in lighting sexy!!!(excuse my loose use of the vernacular)

ATB

C


 
 


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