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TESLA, The Ambitions of Musk
beancount
post Posted: Oct 16 2019, 12:19 AM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Oct 12 2019, 06:19 PM

Makes sense. There's a lot around the battery that is Tesla's responsibility.

 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 12 2019, 06:30 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Oct 11 2019, 07:03 AM

As the article pointed out - the lawyers petition has lead to the NHTSA reviewing whether or not to open a defect investigation. So a small win for the lawyers and their clients. It's now up to the NHTSA to determine whether to open a defect investigation. This is where it could get messy for Tesla, particularly if they find that Tesla was using over the air software updated to mask and cover up a potentially dangerous issue in their vehicles - as alleged in the petition Time will what the NHTSA will do.

QUOTE
The law firm claimed that Tesla should have notified NHTSA of the potential defect and conducted a recall of an estimated 2,000 Model S and Model X vehicles, NHTSA said in its notice.

NHTSA hasn’t opened a defect investigation but is reviewing whether to do so. Tesla shares fell as much as 2.1% before paring losses to trade at $231.36 at 3:04 p.m. in New York on Friday.

Tesla representatives didn’t respond to an email seeking comment.

NHTSA said it would evaluate the allegations and decide whether to grant or deny the petition. If NHTSA grants it, the agency would launch a preliminary defect investigation.




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 12 2019, 06:19 PM
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In Reply To: beancount's post @ Oct 11 2019, 05:22 AM

My understanding is It's not the battery cell (which is produced by Panasonic - which includes various components manufactured by others) itself that appears to be the issue covered in this article rather, as noted in the article, it's the battery management software "update" Tesla issued. I maybe wrong, but I think Tesla designed/developed the system - the system includes sensors and software that manages the charging and discharging of the batteries to make sure they do not overheat.

QUOTE
The petition, filed by a law firm representing Tesla drivers, alleges that Tesla updated battery management software in response to a potential defect that could lead to battery fires, according to the notice.


QUOTE
Tesla released the software after a Model S caught fire in a Hong Kong parking lot in May, saying at the time that the update was a precautionary measure to protect vehicle battery packs.

The August lawsuit claims those software updates limited the battery’s capacity, decreasing the amount of energy it could store and how quickly it could be charged.




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington

Said 'Thanks' for this post: beancount  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Oct 11 2019, 07:03 AM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Oct 5 2019, 03:35 PM

Hmm, not sure if I would put a lot of credence on lawyers pontifications.

Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
beancount
post Posted: Oct 11 2019, 05:22 AM
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Panasonic makes the batteries for Tesla. It'd be tricky to figure out where the fault lies, between the battery itself or the configuration of the battery within the car. It is hard to imagine Tesla's configuration could cause a battery to catch on fire, especially if they worked closely with Panasonic engineers.

 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 5 2019, 03:35 PM
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Tesla battery flaw cover-up claim to be evaluated by NHTSA
Bloomberg News | October 4, 2019
extract
QUOTE
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says it’s received a petition calling for an investigation of certain Tesla Inc. electric cars and is evaluating the complaint, according to a notice posted on regulator’s website.

The petition, filed by a law firm representing Tesla drivers, alleges that Tesla updated battery management software in response to a potential defect that could lead to battery fires, according to the notice.

The law firm claimed that Tesla should have notified NHTSA of the potential defect and conducted a recall of an estimated 2,000 Model S and Model X vehicles, NHTSA said in its notice.

NHTSA hasn’t opened a defect investigation but is reviewing whether to do so. Tesla shares fell as much as 2.1% before paring losses to trade at $231.36 at 3:04 p.m. in New York on Friday.

Tesla representatives didn’t respond to an email seeking comment.

NHTSA said it would evaluate the allegations and decide whether to grant or deny the petition. If NHTSA grants it, the agency would launch a preliminary defect investigation.

read more - https://www.mining.com/web/tesla-battery-fl...uated-by-nhtsa/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 


early birds
post Posted: Sep 5 2019, 12:58 PM
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https://www.afr.com/life-and-luxury/cars-bi...20190905-p52o4i

The 2020 Porsche Taycan represents the biggest investment Porsche has ever made in a new model, Zellmer said, incorporating funds from $US6.6 billion the company has devoted to making electric vehicles at a new factory in Stuttgart. It benefits from the additional $US2 billion that parent group Volkswagen spent to erect the Electrify American program, a VW subsidiary that owns and maintains a national network to charge electric vehicles. Roughly $US800 million of that sum will be used to build an electric network in California alone.

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as i point out long before ------------------ev tech wasn't a big issues for other car maker. the real issue is how Govt. to support ---how to charge the ev cars..............



 
blacksheep
post Posted: Aug 14 2019, 07:39 PM
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Betting against Tesla a $4.1b windfall for these Wall Street investors
QUOTE
Tesla short-sellers have taken a decisive lead in the perennial tug-of-war between bulls and bears on Wall Street.

As the electric carmaker's shares plunged 30 per cent this year, the stock has become the most profitable short bet in the US, according to August 9 data from S3 Partners. Short selling is betting against a share price by borrowing stock and selling it on the open market with the aim of buying it back at a lower price for a profit.

Bears have seen a whopping $US2.75 billion ($4.1 billion) of mark-to-market gains in 2019, according to the firm's head of research Ihor Dusaniwsky.

read more - https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/bet...814-p52gv7.html
Attached File(s)
Attached File  tsla.png ( 126.6K ) Number of downloads: 1

 




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jul 24 2019, 12:20 PM
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QUOTE
A recent report from one of Indonesia’s oldest news agencies has stated that American electric car maker Tesla is looking to build a lithium battery raw material factory in the Morowali Industrial Park (IMIP) area, located in the Central Sulawesi province, Indonesia.

The update comes amidst the recent comments of Maritime Affairs Coordinating Minister Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, who named Tesla as one of the companies that are reportedly looking to build battery facilities in the region. Speaking at the Presidential Palace in Jakarta on Tuesday, Pandjaitan mentioned that Contemporary Amperex Technology (CATL) and LG would also be operating their own facilities in the Morowali area.

Provided that the facility does break ground, Tesla’s lithium battery raw material factory in Indonesia will reportedly be aiming for completion in around three years.

While Tesla is yet to announce or confirm the reports from the Indonesian media outlet, the country’s government is already preparing to welcome the arrival of the massive battery companies, including the Silicon Valley-based electric car maker. Pandjaitan, for his part, claimed that a Presidential Regulation (Perpres) for Electric Vehicles would soon be signed by Indonesian President Joko Widodo.

https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-to-build-li...donesia-report/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: May 26 2019, 05:13 PM
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QUOTE
Elon Musk risks running out of road as rivals wake up

By DANNY FORTSON - The Times

Remember the Palm Pilot? Way back in 1996, the handheld “personal digital assistant” was a revelation. It was the first electronic organiser, complete with a touchscreen and handwriting recognition. It showed Palm’s rivals that customers would pay - and pay handsomely - for a handheld computer, paving the way for BlackBerry and, later, the iPhone.

Yet Palm, the company, met an ignominious end. It was lapped by rivals that took the idea and ran with it. Palm, valued at dollars 50bn on the day it floated in 2000, was passed from one acquirer to another until TCL, a little-known Chinese manufacturer, bought it in 2014 for an undisclosed sum. A plan to revive the brand has gone nowhere.

It is a cautionary tale that Tesla chief executive Elon Musk would do well to heed. His company, which showed the world that drivers would pay - handsomely - for electric cars, is on the ropes. Again. Its stock is down nearly 40 per cent since the start of the year, closing on Friday at $US190.63, and it is burning through more than $SU200m in cash every month. Sales of the California company’s high-end models have plunged.

Perhaps most importantly, Musk’s rivals have woken up. More than 20 electric car models - from BMW, Nissan, Kia, Jaguar and others - have hit the market or will do so in the next year. Musk, who has ploughed a lonely furrow for years, suddenly finds himself facing an all-out assault from Detroit and Frankfurt. The 47-year-old billionaire created the category; now he is at risk of being crowded out. It begs the question: could Tesla become the Palm of electric cars?

More and more investors are asking just that. Dan Ives has long been a Musk believer. Just six months ago he set Tesla’s price target at $440 a share and called it “one of the most dynamic technology innovators over the past 30 years”.

Ives, an analyst at the investment firm Wedbush, last week slashed his price target to $230, saying: “It feels like the walls are caving in.” Meanwhile, in a call with clients, Morgan Stanley’s Adam Jonas said the company had swung rapidly “from a growth story to a distressed credit and restructuring story”.

What’s changed? In a word, credibility.

It was only three weeks ago that Musk raised $2.7bn with shares and convertible loans - money he had spent most of the past year saying he didn’t need. In a call with investors, he said the cash was a “contingency fund”. He added: “We don’t expect to spend this capital.”

It was no secret that the company was losing money, but all seemed under control. At an “autonomy day” just days earlier, Musk - ever the showman - had set out how Tesla would become a $500bn giant thanks to a plan to turn its global fleet into autonomous robo-taxis.

Then everything appeared to change - and with extraordinary speed. In a leaked email Musk sent to employees on May 16, he laid down the law on a “hardcore” cost-cutting plan, writing: “All expenses of any kind anywhere in the world, including parts, salary, travel expenses, rent, literally every payment that leaves our bank account, must be reviewed, confirmed as critical and the top of every page of outgoing payments signed by our chief financial officer. I will personally review and sign every 10th page.”

The extreme measures were for good reason, the chief executive explained. The $2.7bn “contingency fund” had morphed into a lifeline - and a short one at that. Musk wrote that, based on Tesla’s high burn rate, the cash “actually only gives us approximately 10 months”.

He has form for saying one thing, then doing another. Every year since its 2010 float, except for last year, Tesla has tapped investors or banks for more money. Often, the fundraisings have followed Musk’s fervent proclamations of Tesla’s financial strength.

Yet, until recently, investors seemed to be giving him the benefit of the doubt. He was trying to pull off something revolutionary - starting an all-electric car company from a blank sheet of paper. After this month’s fundraising, patience appears to be thinning, principally because the well-publicised “master plan” that Musk laid out is not working as expected.

The key to Tesla’s hopes of turning a profit and breaking the cycle of bailouts is the Model 3 “electric car for the masses”.

In 2017, Tesla made 2,900. Last year, it churned out 180,000. The goal for 2019? At least 250,000, based on production rates from the first few months.

The numbers are impressive - even if the company has been through what Musk has called “production hell” to get there - but the ramp-up is occurring just as Tesla is squeezed by two forces: its own debts and a deluge of new competition.

The company owes about dollars 10bn, with two big chunks falling due soon: a dollars 1.1bn payment by the end of the year, and a further $819m in 2020. After this month’s fundraising, its cash pile sat at $2.8bn.

Factoring in the upcoming debt repayments, and a $200m-plus monthly cash burn, it is clear why Musk is checking his coffee receipts. Breaking into the black, and doing so very soon, is vital. “The debt is a noose around Tesla’s neck,” Ives said. “The math doesn’t lie.”

Musk hopes the Model 3 will be the solution. The company has pledged to sell up to 400,000 cars this year - the majority the Model 3. Investors were spooked last month when Tesla revealed that deliveries for all models in the first three months of the year had come in at 63,000 - nearly a third lower than the preceding quarter. The drop, the company said, was due to the halving of a $7,500 tax credit given by the US government to electric-car buyers. The subsidy is due to be cut in half again in July.

The cuts are based on the total number of electric cars sold by a particular brand, so do not apply to new competitors.

Toni Sacconaghi, the Bernstein analyst famously lambasted by Musk for his “bonehead” questions, said that Tesla’s financial troubles were even worse than they appeared. That is because, in its most recent financial statement, Tesla revealed it had received a $200m infusion in the form of pollution credits, probably from a one-off deal it struck with Fiat Chrysler. The latter paid to pool its fleet with Tesla’s to avoid a multibillion-dollar fine from the EU.

Stripping out the windfall, which equated to about $3,000 for every car sold, Tesla suffered “the largest [margin] decline in [its] history,” Sacconaghi said.

Against that backdrop, Tesla’s rivals are revving up. Mercedes and Audi are joining Jaguar with new electric SUVs while Nissan, Chevrolet, Hyundai and Kia are going head to head with the Model 3.

As the fight for the future of the car industry takes hold, Musk’s unpredictable nature and shifting focus are also worrying investors. He has grabbed headlines with the barely credible plan for an army of robo-taxis - not to mention new insurance products and other “sci-fi projects”, in the words of Ives. Last week, Musk was exulting on Twitter about the successful launch of a fleet of broadband satellites.

“There’s a lack of focus,” Ives said. “Tesla are concentrating on other issues when they should be focused on the hearts and lungs. I can’t look an investor in the eye and recommend a company whose management is disconnected from what is really happening. The bloom has come off the rose.”

When it comes to innovation, being first doesn’t mean you win. Just ask Palm.
Sunday Times



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"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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