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Renewable Energy, Alternative energy, New energy, Solar, Geothermal, Wind
henrietta
post Posted: Apr 30 2020, 06:35 PM
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Got my new 9.9 kW system turned on today. 27 panels, 2 inverters, 2 phase power . Hopefully it will pay for itself in a few years.

Cheers
J



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"Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits." Satchel Paige

"No road is long with good company." Traditional
 
nipper
post Posted: Apr 30 2020, 01:52 PM
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Australia's grid could handle a huge leap in renewable power by 2025

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Australia's main electricity grid will be able to accommodate up to 75 per cent renewable energy as soon as 2025, a higher share delivered sooner than the most optimistic previous assessments. Such a leap in renewable power on the grid could be managed by changes in market rules and regulations, the Australian Energy Market Operator, which manages the nation's energy system, has said in a new study.

“Australia has the technical capability to operate a power system where three-quarters of our energy at times comes from renewable energy resources," Audrey Zibelman, AEMO's chief executive, said. The tumbling cost and speed of building new solar and wind farms has already helped expand clean energy's share to about a quarter of the National Electricity Market. As recently as February, the Energy Security Board was predicting clean energy's share of supply would be 40 per cent by 2030.

On Easter Saturday, renewables' share of the NEM - which provides power to about 80 per cent of the population - topped 50 per cent. There have been concerns that Australia's grid, which was designed to connect to a handful of large scale generators, would not cope with the array of solar panels and wind turbines.

But in the new report, AEMO says it believes careful regulation of power generation can overcome these concerns. Achieving the three-quarter share will need changes in markets and regulation otherwise AEMO will have to impose curbs on renewable energy to ensure grid stability, Ms Zibelman said. If such adjustments don't happen, "AEMO will be required to curtail the contribution of these wind and solar resources to 50 or 60 per cent of their potential even though they are the lowest cost way of providing electricity", she said.

Energy and Emissions Reduction Minister Angus Taylor said Australia was installing renewable energy at 10 times the global rate on a per capita basis but AEMO's report highlighted challenges of maintaining that pace. Mr Taylor said renewables had to be complemented by instantly dispatchable energy "such as a gas-fired power station [that] will be crucial to maintaining the security of any large power system".

AEMO earlier this week revealed more about its view of the future grid in a note to stakeholders about the role technologies such as pumped hydro and batteries will play. The cost of building new transmission lines has risen about 30 per cent compared with initial estimates in its Integrated System Plan (ISP). For new gas-fired plants, the cost blowout is in the order of 30-60 per cent, AEMO said.

Pumped hydro, which is seen as an important back-up for renewable energy, could turn out to be 50 per cent more expensive than estimates in its draft ISP.

"[I]t was recognised that there are higher risks and barriers to investment in pumped hydro compared to other forms of storage, as evidenced by the higher number of utility-scale battery projects currently being planned across the NEM," AEMO said. Big battery costs may be 30 to 40 per cent cheaper than earlier forecast.

Despite those revisions, an AEMO spokesman said they did "not apply to the Snowy 2.0 project", the $5 billion-plus plan announced by the Turnbull government to expand Snowy Hydro's existing capacity.

"[T]he pumped hydro cost increases referred to in the ‘progress update on 2020 ISP’ only apply to future, and as yet uncommitted, pumped hydro projects in mainland Australia," he said. "The [AEMO] changes suggest a scenario or sensitivity without Snowy 2.0 is even more worthwhile to investigate than it already was," said Dylan McConnell, an energy expert at Melbourne University. "The 2018 ISP essentially showed Snowy 2.0 crowded out other storage options," he said. "Assuming this is the case - and the cost updates are accurate - then Snowy 2.0 is more unlikely to be the least-cost solution."

Mr Taylor, though, defended his government's support for the giant project: "Snowy 2.0 is the cheapest option to deliver both the necessary firm capacity and large scale storage within a single project."


http://www.smh.com.au/national/australia-s...54obe.html?btis



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 28 2020, 02:05 PM
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Ask for a market, and what do you get?
.
.
...A market that works both ways.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-28/sola...stment/11903706



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: mullokintyre  
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 13 2019, 08:33 PM
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QUOTE
"This is a trend we've seen for some time. The cost reduction of [rooftop] solar has surpassed forecasts, but no one predicted it would be this deep, this fast”.

Audrey Zibelman, CEO, Australian Energy Market Operator [manager of the National & Wholesale Electricity Markets]



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 7 2019, 02:56 PM
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Australian mining tycoon Andrew Forrest invests in giant solar farm
Cecilia Jamasmie | December 6, 2019 |

QUOTE
Australian mining billionaire and philanthropist Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest is said to have come to the rescue of a massive and troubled solar farm in Western Australia’s Wheatbelt, by agreeing to invest in the A$130 million ($88m) project.

Sydney-based Sun Brilliance has been working on a 100-megawatt solar farm at Cunderdin, about two hours east of Perth, since 2016. The company, however, has struggled to secure financing and faced snags connecting to the grid since it first proposed the project in 2016, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) reports.

Sun Brilliance confirmed through a tweet on Friday that it had held “very positive discussions” with a “high-calibre investor” to back its project, but didn’t mention Forrester or any of its companies.

Just two weeks ago, the founder of iron ore miner Fortescue Metals Group (ASX: FMG) grabbed headlines for backing another solar farm in Australia’s Northern Territory, which is expected to supply electricity to Singapore.

The company behind that project, Sun Cable, said Forrest’s Squadron Energy and Grok Ventures had become co-lead investors in the A$20 billion-plus development. If successful, the so called Australia-Singapore Power Link development would include a 10-gigawatt-capacity array of panels spread across 15,000 hectares near Tennant Creek, backed by about 22 gigawatt-hours in battery storage.

The Northern Territory plan is being developed alongside a similarly ambitious proposal for the Pilbara, the Asian Renewable Energy Hub. The proposed 15-gigawatt wind and solar hybrid plant is expected to power local industry and develop a green hydrogen manufacturing hub.

Forrester is also investing in 60 megawatt (MW) solar farm being built by Alinta Energy at Christmas Creek, which would help replace diesel generation at mines owned by Fortescue Metals.

https://www.mining.com/australias-mining-ty...ant-solar-farm/



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 1 2019, 03:58 PM
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Smart Solar; still pretty dumb?

https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-01/r...y-grid/11731452



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 

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mullokintyre
post Posted: Nov 17 2019, 09:55 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Nov 14 2019, 03:51 PM

The big unanswered question is how much money is going to come srom the public in terms of tax breaks, grants etc.
Been reading about the debacle that was carnegie wave technology.
Governments are the absolute worst at picking winners.
Townsville being in Queensland, I worry a bit.
It was the state government that put money into an app top allow people on cruise ships to share their photos.
Just what we needed.
Mick



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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Nov 16 2019, 09:08 PM
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US QUARTZ SAND FACTORY PLANNED FOR TOWNSVILLE
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High purity quartz sand and graphene used in the production of solar panels and electronics could be produced in a factory at Townsville port if the plans of a US company are realised.
Graphene & Solar Technologies Ltd wants to develop a $300 million advanced technology manufacturing hub, called Global Advanced ..

https://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au/

Graphene & Solar Technologies Limited (formerly known as Solar Quartz Technologies Corporation)

Solar Quartz Technologies Announces a Joint Venture Agreement with NanoGraphene, Inc., a high-level manufacturer of Graphene, as well as a change of the SQTX Company name to Graphene & Solar Technologies Ltd

QUOTE
About Solar Quartz Technologies Corporation.

High Purity Silica Quartz (HPQ) assets are rare globally, and are essential as primary feedstock for the production of High Purity Quartz Sand, an essential primary material necessary in the first stage production of high-tech Photo-Voltaic (PV) solar panels, semi-conductors, fiber optical cables, halogen lamps, HD and LCD television screens, and Epoxy Molding Compounds (EMC). Due to its sole ownership of the solar assets SQTX has significant cost advantages compared to traditional HPQ manufacturers in Norway, Russia and North Carolina.

SQTX is the sole owner of the two High Purity Quartz Silica deposits known as White Springs and Quartz Hill, located in Far North Queensland, Australia, which together, contain in excess of 15 million tons of 99.5%+ pure HPQ deposits, that is in high demand in the global marketplace as feedstock in the production of High Purity Quartz Sand (HPQS), and also in much demand in the high-end electronics manufacturing industry. The company is also seeking funds to build a new commercial scale HPQ pre-processing factory to generate early sales revenues from un-processed HPQ sales to China. Concurrently, it intends to proceed with the development of the second stage factory for processing this feedstock into High Purity Quartz Sand to supply manufacturers of PV solar panels and other high-end technology applications.

"The SQTX management team will initially focus on re-establishing previous $150 million orders from China, and orders for unprocessed HPQ raw quartz, to be delivered from the pre-processing factory in the major port in Townsville, North Queensland, Australia,” said the Houston TX-based Company CEO, Warren Dillard.




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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 14 2019, 03:51 PM
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Posts: 6,959
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QUOTE
Owners of solar farms say a draft ruling from the Australian Energy Market Commission rejecting proposed changes in the allocation of transmission losses on the grid will be devastating for the renewable energy industry and threaten reliable supply.

A group of 20 investors, including Macquarie, BlackRock and AGL Energy's PARF venture with QIC, said renewable energy developers are slowing or stopping investment in response to the losses resulting from grid bottlenecks. That practice is putting "upward pressure" on consumer prices, the Clean Energy Investor Group said on Thursday.

The Clean Energy Council said that without changes, the downturn in investment that has hit the industry this year will continue to worsen.

"This will not only be devastating for the clean energy industry, but also places Australia’s future energy reliability at risk as new investment in wind and solar is needed to replace our ageing coal generators," Clean Energy Council chief Kane Thornton said....

https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/solar-...20191114-p53ah4



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 18 2019, 04:05 PM
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Canberrans asked to do 'heavy lifting' in battling climate change including give up cooking with gas

QUOTE
Under targets set by the new strategy [to go carbon neutral], the ACT would be the first Australian jurisdiction to go natural gas-free from 2045.

Regulations will be changed to remove the requirement for developers to include gas connections in new suburbs. But the policy is a moderately awkward one for the ACT Government, which is a shareholder in ActewAGL, a retail provider of natural gas to Canberra households.

Mr Barr said he expected the transition away from gas within households would be fairly natural. He said as gas appliances died, households would replace them with electric goods, simply because they were most cost-effective. Mr Barr said it was basic consumer maths, as all-electric new home will save an ordinary household around $450 per year.

"I would certainly say to people, look at the relative pricing as well and I think people will reach that conclusion themselves, in terms of the cost of those appliances and how much they cost to run," he said. "The market will drive a lot of that change over the coming two decades."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-16/act-...ifting/11517484



--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
 


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