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Seeking shares with good dividend yield, and offering dividend reinves
alonso
post Posted: Jun 19 2019, 08:19 AM
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BFG is a good one atm but don't know about DRP because I never touch them anymore.



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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jun 18 2019, 11:08 PM
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In Reply To: early birds's post @ Jun 18 2019, 11:05 PM

I reckon JPM only picked those stocks cos they got a whole bunch at cheap prices and want to offload them.
Wouldn't trust the bastards as far as I could kick em.
Mick



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early birds
post Posted: Jun 18 2019, 11:05 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jun 18 2019, 06:34 PM

i thought NAB'S yield is higher than ANZ's ----am i right??? unsure.gif

why the heck JPM didn't point out that?? because they've been shorting it ??? devilsmiley.gif




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nipper
post Posted: Jun 18 2019, 06:34 PM
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Australia's equity market is a tiny slice of the global equity pie: just 2.5 per cent of the developed world's total market capitalisation.

But if you restrict that total universe to include only stocks with dividend yields of at least 6 per cent, the ASX suddenly jumps to 12 per cent of the pie, according to JPMorgan.
QUOTE
the JPMorgan strategist highlights 10 stocks that should provide yields above 5.5 per cent over the next three years. To pass the screen, the dividend per share must be projected to grow over this period, based on the brokers' forecasts, with some share price gains also expected.

The companies (ranked from highest expected average yield) are: Fortescue Metals, Whitehaven Coal, Pendal Group, Westpac, Stockland, BHP, Vicinity Centres, Woodside Petroleum, GUD Holdings and ANZ.




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
alonso
post Posted: Jun 24 2017, 02:28 PM
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In Reply To: bam_bamm's post @ Jun 23 2017, 02:33 PM

I find this site a handy reference for upcoming divs:

http://www.marketindex.com.au/



--------------------
"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith

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bam_bamm
post Posted: Jun 23 2017, 02:33 PM
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Time to resurrect this thread. Capital returns are hard to come by in this market.

9% currently on offer in a junior gold producer. DRP also available to those who see ST, MT and LT value - ASX:SAU (Southern Gold Limited)






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nipper
post Posted: Oct 26 2016, 07:01 PM
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In Reply To: arty's post @ Oct 26 2016, 05:50 PM

very nice, arty; always amazed at how assiduous your approach is.

I've got access to similar, though am very wary of making decisions on trailing info. (apart from rule #126; If a company cuts its dividends, sell down; if it cuts its dividends twice, sell out) (and watch for underwritten dividends)

And, in a related matter, I am also amazed (in a different way) as to buying a label:
QUOTE
One of the most popular niche exchange traded funds in the market, the Vanguard Australian Shares High Yield ETF, had large exposure to the mining giants only for the stocks to slash dividends...

..Yields, which rise when share prices fall, can sometimes send false signals. And high yields, in the order of 7 per cent or more, send a different kind of signal altogether: it can mean the market has lost confidence in the company's ability to pay its dividend.

As with most ETFs similar in structure, Vanguard does not choose the underlying stocks. It replicates a specific index, in this case, the FTSE ASFA Australia High Dividend Yield Index, which oversees the companies that are rotated in and out with an emphasis on stocks commanding above-average forecast dividends. This Vanguard "master" fund has $1.56 billion of assets, of which is $686 million is accessed via ETF and the remainder as a conventional managed fund.

The fund is rebalanced twice a year, which means fees stay low because the manager is not trading with a high frequency. When BHP and Rio's share prices fell, they became eligible for the mix in June 2015. Their combined weighting went from 2 per cent to more than 20 per cent of the fund, according to Morningstar research. When their dividends were cut they fell out of consideration in the June 2016 rebalance and were reduced to a 4 per cent weighting. The ETF underperformed.

Almost 10 per cent of the ETF is in Wesfarmers and 7 per cent is in Commonwealth Bank of Australia. No single stock can exceed 10 per cent of the portfolio and no single sector can exceed 40 per cent.
- bet you most holders didn't look under the bonnet & read THAT small print. Low fees, yes. Underperformance, double yes



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
arty
post Posted: Oct 26 2016, 05:50 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Oct 26 2016, 03:41 PM

I've always been more of a Do-It-Yourselfer.
So, for ASX companies, I have written an Excel program (runs best and fastest under the old Office97) that lists all companies with their latest known dividend, then calculates the yield vs the latest Closing price.

I can run it over any watchlist, or the entire range. The rresult looks like below:

Attached File  YieldASX.png ( 228.15K ) Number of downloads: 41


(Scrolling to the right, there are more columns, displaying GICS Group and location as Australian Postcode or "O/seas")
I do charge a small license fee (discounted to $50 for ShareScene members) to protect my IP.



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I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)

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nipper
post Posted: Oct 26 2016, 03:41 PM
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In Reply To: anglingdarma's post @ Jan 8 2010, 10:42 AM

QUOTE
Over the past year, a number of bellwether stocks have reduced their dividends, particularly those companies directly exposed to falling commodity and oil prices in the Mining and Energy sectors, such as BHP Billiton, Origin, Rio Tinto and Santos. In addition, companies indirectly exposed as providers of services to these industries, such as WorleyParsons, have also cut dividends.

In the recent corporate reporting season, this trend became more widespread, with dividend cuts from ANZ Banking Group, IAG, Wesfarmers and Woolworths.

We have looked back at the top 20 ASX listed companies by market capitalisation from three years ago and the recent cuts to some of their dividends are clearly evident. While some of these companies are no longer in the top 20 companies, 9 of the 20 have cut their dividends in the past 12 months. We expect further challenges to dividends from a number of companies and we are particularly cautious about those that may have unsustainable dividend payout ratios or policies. The banks have been large contributors to the market's dividend growth over a number of years. However we are not expecting to see much, if any, dividend growth from them in the short term.

Outside of this group, Argo has investments in a number of mid-sized companies that have been growing their dividends strongly over the past three years, such as Harvey Norman, Challenger, Macquarie Group, Boral and Perpetual, with only Macquarie Group and QBE currently in the S&P/ASX 20.

As we look forward over the next few years for the increasingly elusive combination of quality companies which are providing earnings and dividend growth at reasonable value, we are encouraged by the outlook for a number of the companies in our portfolio. Although some of them are relatively small or the dividend growth is from a low base, they should be able to sustainably deliver double digit earnings and dividend growth over the coming 12 months.

- Argo Investments




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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
anglingdarma
post Posted: Jan 8 2010, 10:42 AM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Jan 8 2010, 09:28 AM

I agree with you Alonso for ASL. good dividend record for a small cap. If you can tolerate higher volatility, can provide capital gain too.



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Always be thankful every day for what you have around you
 
 


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