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Winston001

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ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ Blue Sky Water Fund (unlisted fund)

The Alternatives Fund's investment in the Blue Sky Water Fund increased 1.35% in January, with Water Entitlement values strengthening across most of the portfolio during the month. NSW general security Water Entitlements were the best performers with some prices rising 6% over the month.

 

ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ Duxton Water Limited (ASX: D2O)

Current inflows remain above average which is assisting to build momentum towards higher water availability for next season. Deliveries of Goulburn Inter Valley Transfers commenced in January. These IVT deliveries reopened the opportunities for temporary allocation trade out of the Goulburn valleys into the Murray system. This has been the catalyst for the temporary price decline (-2.23% for one month; -0.11% for 3 months). However, if dry conditions persist and current maturation of crops and/or carryover demand improves, a new price floor may emerge.

 

huh?

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At the high-tech end of the water sector, Israeli firm and ASX listed Emefcy Group (EMC) has developed a Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) product that enables wastewater to be reused for specific purposes such as crop irrigation. Emefcy has designed its technology for remote areas, invariably in poor parts of the world that suffer from severe water shortages.

 

The company announced it has three new commercial agreements in China and investors lifted the SP 27 per cent so far since the beginning of May.

 

"Anything that looks to contribute solutions to China's extremely serious water issues is likely to receive investor interest," Tom King, chief investment officer of Nanuk Asset Management, said. "But a lot of these smaller companies have a lot of value ascribed to the future."

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Australian farmers are using about 23 per cent less water for their food and fibre production than they were just three years ago with government water buybacks, structural changes, and seasonal conditions all playing a key part in the overall reduction.

 

In the year to June 2016, about 85,000 farming enterprises used 9.2 million megalitres of water ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ or about 3.7 million Olympic size pools ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ for their crops, horticulture and animals. That figure is down from the 11.9 million megalitres used in the year to June 2013, according to the newly released data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

 

The majority of water used on farms is for irrigation and that figure has also reduced to 8.38 million megalitres from 8.95 million megalitres in June 2015 and 11.1 million megalitres in the year to June 2013.

 

The water use is likely to continue to reduce as farmers make changes to the way they farm and the government continues to take water out of the system.

 

http://www.afr.com/content/dam/images/g/x/7/r/n/z/image.imgtype.afrArticleInline.620x0.png/1499587103137.png

Last month the Commonwealth government purchased all 21,901 megalitres of Tandou's Lower Darling irrigation water entitlements south of Menindee, NSW for $78 million from listed group Webster as part of the government's plan to decommission the Lake Tandou irrigation system which had been used for irrigated farming.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/real-estate/australian-...f#ixzz4mOGjTT9J

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The number of farms across Australia that irrigate has dropped to 22,700 in the year to June 2016 from 36,200 in the year to June 2014 http://www.afr.com/content/dam/images/g/x/7/r/o/2/image.imgtype.afrArticleInline.620x0.png/1499587112844.png

 

Colliers International's Rural & Agribusiness director of valuation Shaun Hendy said he had noticed certain changes to what farmers were doing with water. "There are structural changes going on which would account for the changes in usage and that includes an increase in high-valued permanent tree plantings and the transition from traditional irrigated rice production to irrigated cotton ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâ€Â¦ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã¢â‚¬Å“ which uses less water per hectare basis," Mr Hendy said.

 

"We have observed that as part of the structural change in rice growing to cotton growing, irrigators are using less water and selling surplus water into the temporary water markets." "There may also be a decrease in farms that irrigate because they may have sold the water to the government or the farms might have amalgamated."

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Financial Review - afr.com

...

Blue Sky Alternative Investments has defended the strategy behind its water fund, saying there is no impropriety involved and that it could not move the market for water rights in its trading activities.

 

Acting Blue Sky boss Kim Morison told The Australian Financial Review's Chanticleer column on June 27 that Blue Sky accounts for only 10 or 20 per cent of transactions in the entire Australian water market. In the same interview, he acknowledged "there is a rumour around that this is a Ponzi scheme", which he forcefully rebutted and Blue Sky backed up in a separate update on Tuesday.

 

"Blue Sky actively limits its deployment of committed capital to prevent artificial inflation of market prices over time," the company said in an ASX statement. On the basis of its "relatively low level of monthly turnover", Blue Sky "rarely outbids irrigators in the various regional water markets". Irrigators are the end users of water.

 

"Blue Sky categorically rejects any suggestion that its activities in Australia's water markets" are "illegitimate, lack due process and governance, or are inconsistent with principles of the National Water Initiative to promote markets to allow water to trade to its highest and best use."....

 

..Water market experts supported the view that investor participants could not corner the market, which is dominated by irrigators and government owners.

 

Alister Walsh, director of water at Duxton Capital and manager of the ASX-listed Duxton Water, estimated that state and Commonwealth governments held around 30 per cent of the rights in the Southern connected system which covers the Murray Darling.

 

"Of the roughly 70 per cent of rights that are left, the majority are held by irrigators themselves; using the data available to us we estimate only 3 to 5 per cent are held by investor groups, like Duxton Water," he said.

 

"Groups like ourselves which are coming into the market, not looking to use the water for production, are able to provide alternative water supply solutions (like long-term leases) that are supporting the development of further agri-production in these regions. For irrigators, their decision on what to pay for water comes down to the economic return per megalitre that they can generate in their respective industries."

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An interest read - The day they turned off the taps - http://aheadoftheherd.com/Newsletter/2018/...ff-the-taps.pdf

 

Conclusion

Our worldÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s most precious resource, water, is in danger from rising temperatures

due to human-caused or natural global warming. The changes are so gradual that

most of us donÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t even notice theyÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢re happening. What does it matter if the sea

rises a few centimeters a year, or if the aquifers are losing groundwater? It

matters because we interfere with nature at our peril.

 

As we stated at the top, of all the water on Earth, less than 1% is fresh - found in

underground aquifers, lakes and rivers. ItÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s actually very little, and it doesnÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t take

much to throw the entire system into chaos. We rely on aquifers not only for

drinking water, but to irrigate land and grow crops. Saudi Arabia is a good

example of a country that over-pumped its water supplies so much that it can no

longer produce its own food. Droughts caused by a warming planet are getting

more frequent and lasting longer. Combine depleting aquifers and saltwater

intrusion with desertification, and you have a recipe for crop failure, leading to

food insecurity, higher food prices, starvation, mass dislocations of populations

and possibly even wars. The next time you fill a glass of water from your tap at

home, think of where it came from, and how much is left.

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Harvard Quietly Amasses California VineyardsÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚¬Ãƒâ€¦Ã‚¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂand the Water Underneath

Making a bet on climate change, the universityÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s $39 billion endowment has been snapping up farmland and the related water rights

 

HarvardÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s bet has proven prescient. The $39 billion fund, among AmericaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s biggest endowments, now values its vineyards at $305 million, up nearly threefold from in 2013, while its overall natural-resources investments have done poorly.

 

In a warming planet, few resources will be more affected than water, as more-frequent droughts, storms and changes in evaporation alter a flow critical for drinking, farming and industry.

 

Even though there arenÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢t many ways to make financial investments in water, investors are starting to place bets. Buying arable land with access to it is one way. In CaliforniaÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¾Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢s Central Coast, ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“the best property with the best water will sell for record-breaking prices,ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ says JoAnn Wall, a real-estate appraiser who specializes in vineyards, ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“and properties without adequate water will suffer in value.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ÂÂ

 

Investors who see agriculture as a proxy for betting on water include Michael Burry, a hedge-fund investor whose wager against the U.S. housing market was chronicled in the book and movie ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“The Big Short.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ In a 2015 New York Magazine interview, Mr. Burry was quoted as saying: ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Â¦ÃƒƒÂ¢Ãƒ¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…âہ“What became clear to me is that food is the way to invest in water. That is, grow food in water-rich areas and transport it for sale in water-poor areas.ÃÆâ€â„¢ÃƒÆ’ƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¢ÃƒÆ’¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢Ã¢â€š¬Ã…¡Ãƒâ€šÃ‚¬ÃƒÆ’…¡Ãƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚¬ÃƒÆ’â€Å¡Ãƒƒâہ¡ÃƒÆ’‚ Mr. Burry declined to comment.

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/harvard-quietl...=trending_now_1

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